National Action Plan: Luxembourg

Luxembourg adopted its first National Action Plan (NAP) in 2018. The NAP was developed by Luxembourg’s Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs, to be implemented for the 2018-2023 period. 

Luxembourg’s NAP is a continuation of and reflects the commitments of the country’s National Action Plan on Gender Equality, which was implemented during the 2015-2018 period. The NAP is organized around the four pillars of UNSCR 1325 (participation, prevention, protection, and resolution and recovery), and identifies gender equality as a “prerequisite” for peace and security as well as an “essential condition” for sustainable development. Additionally, the NAP indicates that Luxembourg’s action plan is directly linked to the 2030 Agenda, with particular emphasis on SDGs 5 and 16 on gender equality and peace and justice, respectively. The NAP approaches WPS implementation both at the national and international level. 

Luxembourg has no recent history of conflict, but was a founding member of NATO. The country is also a contributing member to Eurocorps, a multinational and intergovernmental military corps, which remains at the disposal of the EU and NATO. Luxembourg contributes troops to global peacekeeping missions as well. 

In 2018, Luxembourg spent $419 million on military expenses. Luxembourg was among the first countries to sign and ratify the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), which regulates the flow of weapons across international borders. Luxembourg is also among the few countries to have legislation banning public and private financial institutions from investing in cluster munitions. Nevertheless, a 2016 report demonstrated that Luxembourg has significant gaps in its banking regulations to prohibit banks from financing and investing in the production and transfer of internationally banned weapons or arms. 

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WILPF

WILPF does not have a country section in Luxembourg and therefore was not involved in the development process of its NAP.

Civil Society Actors

NAP Development:

The NAP indicates that civil society was involved in the development of the NAP, but does not specify which civil society organizations were a part of this process. 

NAP Implementation:

Civil society inclusion is mentioned under several action items for specific objectives (e.g., “Advocacy, analysis, and dialogue with civil society and other stakeholders” on page 28). However, the NAP does not provide further information on civil society inclusion in the implementation of the NAP. 

NAP Monitoring & Evaluation:

The NAP indicates that civil society will be involved in monitoring the implementation of the NAP. However, the document does not specify which civil society organizations will be represented or how they will contribute to the implementation of the NAP. 

Government Actors

NAP Development:

The NAP was developed by Luxembourg’s Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs. 

NAP Implementation:

The NAP will be implemented by the Ministries of State; Foreign and European Affairs; National Education; Children and Youth; Equal Opportunities; Family, Integration and the Greater Region; Justice; Health; and Internal Security. 

NAP Monitoring & Evaluation:

The Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs will be responsible for monitoring the implementation of the NAP, and will evaluate it on an annual basis. The Ministry will also send an interim implementation report to the Government Council in preparation for developing the next action plan.

Objectives

The NAP identifies four overarching objectives, compiled under the slightly modified four pillars of UNSCR 1325: participation; prevention; protection, relief, and recovery; and promotion. These objectives are listed below:

Participation: Promote the equal participation of women and men at all levels of peace and security processes, and support women's participation in decision-making.

Prevention: Strengthening peace and security in line with UNSCR 1325; preventing sexual and gender-based violence.

Protection, Relief, and Recovery: Strengthening gender-based violence training for Luxembourg staff; implement such training for local forces in peacekeeping operations; strengthening access to justice and redress.

Promotion: Promoting the women and peace and security agenda at the national and international levels.

Action/Activities

The NAP has an implementation matrix that breaks down each overarching objective with corresponding specific objectives, actions, indicators, and ministries and departments involved. For example, the overarching category of prevention has “Commit to eliminate cluster munitions and anti-personnel mines” as a specific objective. This objective lists, “Continue efforts within the framework of the convention on cluster munitions and the Convention on anti-personnel mines, emphasizing the effects of these weapons on women; mine clearance projects” as an action item (p. 29).  

Timeframe

The implementation period of the NAP is five years (2018-2023).

Budget

The NAP does not include an allocated or estimated budget. 

Indicators

The NAP identifies several indicators for each objective, outlined in the implementation matrix. For example, the objective, “Commit to eliminate cluster munitions and anti-personnel mines” lists “Interventions made; funds allocated” as an indicator (p. 29). 

Monitoring & Evaluation

The Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs will be responsible for monitoring the implementation of the NAP, and will evaluate it on an annual basis. The Ministry will also send an interim implementation report to the Government Council in preparation for developing the next action plan. The NAP does not include a monitoring and evaluation framework beyond this general overview. 

Disarmament

The NAP does not address directly disarmament. However, one of the specific objectives listed under the overarching category of prevention mentions eliminating cluster munitions and anti-personnel mines: “Commit to eliminate cluster munitions and anti-personnel mines and to highlight their effects on the women in their socio-economic activities in situations of conflict or post-conflict situations (farming, collecting water or firewood, etc)” (p. 25).