National Action Plan: Namibia

Namibia adopted its first National Action Plan (NAP) in 2019. The NAP was developed by a National Task Team, consisting of several ministries and UN technical advisors, to be implemented for the 2019-2024 period. 

Namibia’s NAP builds on the country’s National Gender Policy, developed for the 2010-2020 period. The NAP is also seen as complementary to the other mechanisms and frameworks developed to advance women’s rights in Namibia. The overarching goal of the NAP is to create “a safe and peaceful Namibia where all women, men, girls and boys have equal rights and live without fear or want and in dignity” (p. 16). 

Namibia gained independence from South Africa in 1990 and joined the UN that same year. The most recent conflict in the country’s history is the Caprivi Conflict, which lasted from 1994 until 1999 and took place between the Namibian government and the Caprivi Liberation Army. The conflict displaced thousands of people, who took refuge in the neighboring Botswana. 

In 2018, Namibia spent $452 million on military expenses. Namibia is a contributor to UN Peacekeeping Operations, with a total of 48 personnel serving in missions as of August 2019. Namibia signed, but did not ratify the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), which regulates the flow of weapons across international borders. 

Document PDF: 

Namibia National Gender Policy (2010-2020)

Namibia NAP (2019-2024)

WILPF

WILPF International does not have a country section in Namibia and therefore was not involved in the development process of Namibia’s NAP.

Civil Society Actors

NAP Development:

The NAP indicates that civil society organizations were included in the development process of the NAP through consultative meetings. 

NAP Implementation:

The NAP identifies civil society organizations as among the key actors of several strategic objectives. For example, strategic objective #1 (To mainstream a gender perspective in security sector legislation) lists “relevant civil society institutions” as among the key actors. However, the NAP does not further specify which organizations will be a part of the implementation. 

NAP Monitoring & Evaluation:

The NAP does not indicate civil society inclusion in the monitoring and evaluation of the NAP.

Government Actors

NAP Development:

The NAP was developed by a National Task Team, which consisted of the Ministry of Defense, Ministry of Gender Equality and Child Welfare, Ministry of International Relations and Cooperation, and UN technical advisors. The Ministry of Defense chaired the team while the Ministry of Gender Equality and Child Welfare, Ministry of International Relations and Cooperation acted as co-chairs. Additionally, the NAP development process also entailed consultative meetings with multiple stakeholders, including government ministries, security sector institutions, traditional authorities, the military, women’s organisations, faith-based organisations, civil society, and youth organisations. 

NAP Implementation:

Multiple ministries are tasked with implementing the NAP on the implementation matrix alongside other actors, such as civil society organizations and regional councils. 

NAP Monitoring & Evaluation:

The NAP indicates that the Ministry of Gender Equality and Child Welfare will be responsible for monitoring the implementation of the NAP. 

Objectives

The NAP identifies 10 objectives (referred to as “priority areas”), compiled under the four pillars of UNSCR 1325: participation, prevention, protection, and relief and recovery. On Namibia’s NAP, participation has three objectives, prevention has three objectives, protection has two objectives, and relief and recovery has two objectives listed. Each priority area has its own strategic objectives. For example, priority area #2 listed under participation is: “Participation of women in peace and security structures” (p. 19). Strategic objective #1 for this priority area is: “To mainstream a gender perspective in security sector legislation” (p.19, implementation matrix).

Action/Activities

The NAP has a detailed implementation matrix that breaks down each priority area with corresponding strategic objectives, activities, expected outcomes, indicators and means of verification, time frame, and key actors. For example, strategic objective #1 listed under priority area #2 for participation identifies “Review existing security sector legislation (acts, policies, regulations) to ensure gender sensitivity” and “Initiate security sector reviews and issue directives that are gender responsive and/or inclusive” as the corresponding activities of this objective (p. 19, implementation matrix). 

Timeframe

The implementation period of the NAP is five years (2019-2024).

Budget

The NAP includes an estimated budget of $3 million, broken down with separate estimates for five fiscal years, for the implementation of the action plan. 

Indicators

The NAP identifies several indicators, both qualitative and quantitative, for each objective, outlined in the implementation matrix. For example, strategic objective #1 listed under participation identifies, “Number of legislation reviewed and updated” and “Existence of gender inclusive reviews and directives” as indicators and means of verification (p. 19, implementation matrix). 

Monitoring & Evaluation

The NAP indicates that the Ministry of Gender Equality and Child Welfare will be responsible for monitoring the implementation of the NAP and that implementation will be monitored annually. Additionally, the document states that the NAP “will be accompanied by a monitoring and evaluation plan, to be used by different stakeholders” and that all actors responsible for implementing the NAP will need to report on their activities (p. 32). However, the NAP does not specify when or how the plan will be developed or made available. 

Disarmament

The NAP does not address disarmament in its objectives or scope of implementation.