National Action Plan: Kyrgyzstan

Flag of Kyrgyz Republic

Kyrgyzstan has adopted two National Action Plans (NAP) to date, in 2013 and 2018 to be implemented for the period of 2013-2014 and 2018-2020, respectively. The following is a brief summary and analysis of the country’s second NAP.

Similar to Kyrgyzstan's first NAP, the country’s second action plan consists solely of an implementation matrix and does not provide an overview of the NAP development process or how UNSCR 1325 implementation fits into the country's historical and political context.

Kyrgyzstan gained independence from the Soviet Union in 1991. Since then, the country has experienced political instability and ethnic tension as well as two major instances of civil unrest—the Tulip Revolution of 2005 and the Kyrgyz Revolution of 2010, which led to the ousting of the then presidents Askar Akayev and Kurmanbek Bakiyev, respectively. In 2010, the growing unrest resulted in an interethnic conflict between the majority Kyrgyz and minority Uzbeks, leaving over 400 casualties and hundreds of wounded. The conflict has had distinct gendered impacts, with women subjected to sexual violence, humiliation, and extortion as well as experiencing social stigma as survivors of sexual violence. 

In 2018, Kyrgyzstan’s military spending was $121.2 million (a slight decrease from $121.5 million in 2017). Kyrgyzstan joined the UN in 1992 and is a contributor to UN Peacekeeping Operations, with a total of 11 personnel serving as of September 2019. Kyrgyzstan is also a member of NATO’s Partnership for Peace Program. Kyrgyzstan has neither signed nor ratified the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), which regulates the flow of weapons across international borders. 

Document PDF: 

Kyrgyzstan 1st NAP (2013-2014)

Kyrgyzstan NAP Analysis: Miller, Pournik, Swaine

Kyrgyzstan 2nd NAP (2018-2020)

WILPF

WILPF does not have a country section in Kyrgyzstan and therefore was not involved in the development process of Kyrgyzstan’s NAP.

Civil Society Actors

NAP Development:

The NAP does not provide information about the development process of the NAP. 

NAP Implementation:

The NAP indicates that ministries, state committees, administrative departments, local state administrations, and local governments are to “take measures to implement the action plan with participation of representatives of civil society, international and non-profit organizations.” However, the NAP does not further specify details about civil society inclusion in the implementation of the action plan. 

NAP Monitoring & Evaluation:

The NAP does not indicate civil society inclusion in the monitoring and evaluation of the NAP. 

Government Actors

NAP Development:

The NAP does not provide information about the development process of the NAP. 

NAP Implementation:

The NAP tasks several ministries and state commissions with the implementation of the plan. These government actors include Ministries of Health; Interior; Emergency Situations; and Education as well as the State Committee of National Security, among others. The NAP also lists local governments and an inter-agency working group among the actors responsible for implementing select objectives of the NAP. 

NAP Monitoring & Evaluation:

The NAP does not specify a specific government actor responsible for the monitoring and evaluation of the NAP. Instead, it states that “control over the implementation of this decree shall be entrusted to the Department of Defense, Law Enforcement and Emergency Situations of the Office of Prime Minister of the Kyrgyz Republic.” (p.2)

Objectives

The NAP identifies three main objectives: 

  1. Strengthening the role and participation of women, including at decision-making level, in activities aimed at preserving peace and security;

  2. Strengthening the interaction of government, local governments and civil society in order to prevent conflicts and the risks of violence against women and girls, as well as measures to address the effects of crisis situations;

  3. Improving the system of protection and taking into account the special needs and requirements of women and girls in emergency situations.

Action/Activities

The NAP has an implementation matrix that breaks down each objective with corresponding tasks, measures/actions, indicators, responsible agency, terms of implementation, and form of implementation. For example, objective #1, “Strengthening the role and participation of women, including at decision-making level, in activities aimed at preserving peace and security,” identifies “increasing women's representation in local council and local government bodies” as one of the tasks listed for this objective. The task is then broken down to a measure/action, which is “conducting training for producing trainers among women leaders for the further cascade training of women in villages.” 

Timeframe
The NAP does not specify a timeframe for the implementation of the action plan; however, the implementation matrix sets the timeframe for identified activities as 2018-2020.
Budget
The NAP does not contain an allocated or estimated budget. However, the preface to the implementation matrix states that ministries, state committees, administrative departments, local state administrations, and local governments are to “finance the activities of the action plan at the expense of funds provided for by the government bodies and local authorities involved in its implementation, according to the laws of the Kyrgyz Republic ‘On the state budget of the Kyrgyz Republic for 2018 and the forecast for 2019-2020,’ as well as other sources not prohibited by law of Kyrgyz Republic.”
Indicators
The NAP identifies an indicator for each objective as well as the objective’s corresponding tasks and measures/actions. For example, objective #1, “Strengthening the role and participation of women, including at decision-making level, in activities aimed at preserving peace and security,” lists “number of special measures inserted in government bodies” as an indicator. This objective’s first task, “increasing women's representation in local council and local government bodies” lists “number of trained women” as an indicator.
Monitoring & Evaluation
The NAP does not include a monitoring and evaluation plan. However, the preface to the implementation matrix identifies two benchmarks for tracking progress: 1) Based on the results of the first half year, ministries, state committees, administrative departments, local state administrations, and local governments will provide a progress report to the Ministry of Internal Affairs and 2) Following the results of each half year, the Ministry of Internal Affairs will submit a final report to the Office of Government.
Disarmament
The NAP does not address disarmament or demilitarization.