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National Action Plan: Switzerland

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The Swiss Government has launched its fourth National Action Plan for a period of five years (2018-2022). It builds on Switzerland’s first NAP (for the period 2007-2009), its second NAP (for the period 2010-2012) and its third NAP (for the period 2013-2016).  The fourth NAP includes a focus for greater participation by women in the prevention of violent extremism, since the passing of UNSCR 2242 (2015) as well as the incorporation of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 5.   The development of the fourth NAP was led by  the Interdepartmental Working Group (IDWG 1325) in consultation with Swiss representations abroad, Swiss civil society and partner organisations. Swiss civil society is involved, for the first time, in the implementation of the NAP. The NAP is based on recommendations from civil society’s ‘1325 Reloaded’ report. This NAP includes an additional focus on engaging  men in on women, peace and security work.  In regards to disarmament, the revised NAP includes, a call for greater consideration of gender aspects in arms control, disarmament and non-proliferation. The analysis below includes brief updates at the top of each relevant section.

Switzerland has no recent history of conflict, but plays an important role in international humanitarian and development operations, although it only joined the UN in 2002.

Civil society, for the first time will be included in the monitoring and evaluation as well as the implementation process of the fourth NAP. In addition, there was a direct link included on gender and disarmament. Overall, Swiss civil society was more involved in the the development, monitoring and evaluation and implementation stages of the NAP. 

From a recent academic analysis: The second Swiss NAP is not much more specific than the first version. It also shares a unique characteristic with the first NAP in only covering a three-year span, compared to four or five years, which most other NAPs tend to cover. The 2010 Swiss NAP also shares the same three priority areas as the first Swiss NAP. A major difference is that civil society was consulted during the development of this version yet civil society is still not included in monitoring and evaluation. (Miller, Pournik, & Swaine, 2014)

Document PDF: 

Switzerland analysis: Miller, Pournik, Swaine

Switzerland Revised NAP (2013-2016)

Switzerland's 4th NAP (2018-2021)

1325 Reloaded Report on Women, Peace and Security

WILPF

WILPF-Switzerland was not involved in the development of the National Action Plan (NAP).

Civil Society Actors

UPDATE-2018:

Swiss civil society is for the first time involved in the implementation of NAP 1325.

NAP Development

Civil society formed part of the development of the NAP through consultations. 

NAP Implementation

Civil society is involved in the implementation of NAP 1325 through a specific project which aims among other things to raise awareness among policymakers and the public.

NAP Monitoring & Evaluation

Civil society is mentioned to be part of the evaluation process through a participatory process.  

Government Actors

UPDATE-2018:

NAP Development

The NAP was developed by members of the IDWG 1325 such as the Department of Foreign Affairs (FDFA), the Federal Department of Defence, Civil Protection and Sport (DDPS), the Federal Department of Home Affairs (FDHA) and the Federal Department of Justice and Police (FDJP) as well as Civil Society (CS).

NAP Implementation

The Interdepartmental Working Group 1325 (IDWG 1325), headed by the FDFA’s Human Security Division, is responsible for implementing the measures during the 2018–22 period. 

NAP Monitoring & Evaluation

The IDWG meets at least twice a year to review implementation, exchange knowledge and if necessary adapt the NAP. 

Objectives

UPDATE-2018: The main goals of the 2018-2022 NAP are:

1. Effective involvement of women in conflict prevention 

2. Women’s participation in and influence on conflict resolution and peace processes 

3. Protection against sexual and gender-based violence in conflict, refugee and migration contexts

4. Women’s participation in peace missions and security policy 

5. Multi- and bilateral commitment by Switzerland to women, peace and security

 

UPDATE-2016: The third revised NAP supersedes the country's previous commitments in this area.  The second revised NAP contained three goals while this third revised NAP contains five.  They include:

1) Greater participation of women in peacebuilding

2) Protection of the rights of women and girls during and after violent conflicts, and prevention of gender-based violence

3) Greater inclusion of a gender perspective during and after armed conflicts in emergency aid, reconstruction and in dealing with the past

4) Greater inclusion of a gender perspective in conflict prevention

5) Mainstreaming “Women, Peace and Security” in the federal administration

Each goal is broken down by subordinate goals: 

  • Multilateral policy
  • Switzerland’s personnel policy
  • Bilateral activities and peace policy programmes as well as programmes for fragile states

Switzerland's second revised NAP has three main goals:

1) Greater participation of women in peacebuilding.

2) Prevention of gender-based violence and protection of the needs of and rights of women and girls.

3) A gender sensitive approach to all peacebuilding projects and programs.

Action/Activities

UPDATE-2018: Switzerland’s 2018-2022 NAP has various activities assigned to achieve its objectives. For example, for the first objective “effective involvement of women in conflict prevention ” includes subordinate goal 1.2:

The political and economic situation allows women to participate in political and peace processes.

 

UPDATE-2016: The third revised NAP supersedes the country's previous commitments in this area. This NAP contains five objectives and each has many actions.  For example, Goal 5, "Mainstreaming “Women, Peace and Security” in the federal administration" includes subordinate goal 2.2:

  • The administration‘s gender networks contain, wherever possible, an equal number of men and women.

Switzerland's second NAP contains an action matrix / lograme with specific activities under the primary goals, lead agents and indicators. The below example is taken from Goal 2, "Prevention of gender-based violence and protection of the needs and rights of women and girls."

Action / Activity

Prosecution of GBV as a war crime, crime against humanity or genocide, where the conditions for Swiss intervention are met. Lead Agent Office of the Armed Forces Attorney General, fedpol, BA

Indicator

i. Number of proceedings initiated.

ii. Number of prosecutions for GBV.

iii. Number of individuals convicted for GBV or acquitted.

Timeframe

The fourth NAP is to be implemented in a period of five years 2018-2022. 

Budget

UPDATE-2018: Each organisational unit is responsible for implementing the activities assigned to it, allocating a budget for the activities and submitting year-end reports, however, there is no specific budget outlined in the NAP

Indicators

UPDATE-2018: Switzerland’s 2018-2022 NAP has various activities assigned to achieve its objectives. For example, for the first objective “Effective involvement of women in conflict prevention ” includes subordinate goal 1.2, "the political and economic situation allows women to participate in political and peace processes" and its indicators are:

  • Recommendations on context-specific socioeconomic empowerment of women as a prerequisite for their participation in political processes.

 

UPDATE-2016: The third revised NAP supersedes the country's previous commitments in this area. The NAP contains many indicators for each goal and subordinate goals. For example, Goal 5, "Mainstreaming “Women, Peace and Security” in the federal administration"  includes subordinate goal 3.3 "Strengthening of cooperation with strategic partners in the area of gender mainstreaming" and the indicators include:

  • Programmes of strategic partners include the gender perspective.
  • Contracts with strategic partners contain gender-specific targets.

The indicators in Switzerland's second revised NAP correlate with specific activities in the action matrix / log-frame. Most of the indicators are measurable but do not specify a timeframe.

Action / Activity

Routine training of all members of the Swiss Expert Pool for Civilian Peacebuilding.

Lead Agent

PD IV

Indicator

i. Percentage of seconded personnel who has undergone training.

ii. Collection of qualitative feedback on training using course evaluation questionnaires.

Monitoring & Evaluation

UPDATE- 2018:

Under the joint leadership of the United Nations and International Organisations Division (UNIOD) and the Human Security Division (HSD), a brief annual report is drawn up setting out the most important successes and difficulties in implementing the NAP. This annual report provides input for the UN Secretary-General’s report and, where relevant, for the country report to the CEDAW. An external evaluation of the NAP is carried out as part of a peer-review process.

 

The Working Group on 1325 meets annually to ensure the constant follow-up of implementation measures. These meetings are attended by at least one representative of each government department in charge of implementation. The Coordination Committee for Peace Policy is informed at its own follow-up meeting about the results of the annual meeting and the current status of the implementation efforts.

At the Gender and Peacebuilding Roundtables organized by the Centre for Peacebuilding representatives of non-governmental organizations involved in peacebuilding efforts will be informed about the annual meeting and the current status of implementation work.

Disarmament

UPDATE-2018: The fourth revised NAP supersedes the country's previous commitments in this area. The fourth NAP makes reference to the gendered impact of the proliferation of small arms on women. Goal 4, on “women’s participation in peace missions and security policy ”, subordinate action 4 pushes for “increased proportion of women and greater consideration of gender aspects in arms control, disarmament and non-proliferation” and its indicators are:

  • References to gender aspects in arms control, disarmament and non-proliferation training.
  •  Information on women’s presence in the disarmament sector. 

 

UPDATE-2016:  The third revised NAP supersedes the country's previous commitments in this area. The third NAP makes reference to Switzerland's engagement in the Mine Action Service and acknowledges the gendered impact of the proliferation of small arms on women.  Goal 4, subordinate action 1.2 pushes for "Integration of gender aspects into small arms control and international arms control" with indicators including: 

  • Statements and sponsored instruments for tighter controls on small arms 
  • Commitment to the implementation of the Arms Trade Treaty

 


There is no language on disarmament in Switzerland's second revised NAP.