PERU: Closing the Gender Land Gap: The Effects of Land-Titling for Women in Peru

Sunday, November 1, 2009
Author: 
Daniela Orge Fuentes and Henrik Wiig
Americas
South America
Peru

In most developing countries agricultural land is the property of men. Landownership is associated with status, power and wealth. Scholars also posit that those who own the property within the household often determine who has more bargaining power within the marriage and make the household and farm decisions (Agarwal, 1994a). Moreover, a growing empirical body of literature shows that women's landownership not only enhances their bargaining power, but also leads to improvements in households' incomes, as well as improving other measures of welfare, such as child health and school attendance (Deere and León, 2001b). This has spurred an interest in policies that promote women's access to land and other assets, and hence gender equity, among development practicioners and academia in general.

Document PDF: 

Fuentes & Wiig, Closing the Gender Land Gap: The Effects of Land-Titling for Women in Peru, 2009