Country / Region profile of: Iceland

After the global financial crisis in 2008, Icelandic women were at the forefront in the recovery of the economy. Despite its lack of armed forces, Iceland is a member of NATO and thus involved in NATO operations, including the international conflict in Afghanistan. In 1985, Iceland ratified the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). Iceland voted for the adoption of the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), signed on 3rd June 2013, and ratified on 2nd July 2013. No information is available as to Iceland's military spending in 2017. Iceland is ranked 1 out of 144 listed countries in the 2017 Global Gender Gap Index (GGI). Despite Iceland's success in certain areas, gender issues - including gender stereotyping in the labour market and economic inequality - continue to exist in Iceland and further progress toward gender equality and women's empowerment is necessary. 

"Iceland was the first in the world into the [financial] crisis, but we could be the first out, and women have a big role to play in that. It goes back to our Viking women. While the men were out there raping and pillaging, the women were running the show at home." -Halla Tómasdóttir

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR!

$ 0
Military expenditure
The country spends an unknown amount of money on the military
Investing in peace and gender equality
Iceland could invest in ongoing funding of its National Action Plan for the Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325.
NAP 1325
The Iceland NAP does not include an allocated or estimated budget and there are no other financial resource consideration references within the NAP.
WPS commitments
Iceland made no specific financial commitments on Women, Peace and Security in 2017.

Country / Region profile of: Hungary

Hungarian women have low rates of employment and public participation due to society's traditional beliefs that women belong in the household. In 2012, the conservative legislature enacted a new constitution that earned international criticism because it weakened legal checks on the governing party's authority and violated international and European human rights standards, including interfering with women's reproductive rights. Hungary is not in the state of conflict todayit is a member of the North-Atlantic Treaty Ogranisation (NATO) since 1999. Hungary ratified the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) in 1980, and is ranked 103 out of 144 listed countries in the 2017 Global Gender Gap Index (GGI). Hungary ratified the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) on 2 April 2014. During the 2017 October Open Debate, Hungary gave a statement affirming support for WPS but made no specific commitments towards the implementation of UNSCR 1325 and the WPS Agenda holistically. In 2017, $1414.7 million were spent by Hungary on its military; subsequently, Hungary has yet to develop a National Action Plan on the Implementation of Resolution 1325 (2000). Greater public participation by Hungarian women is essential to the protection of women's interests and the promotion of gender equality.

"Hungary is far away from this especially because the ideology of “familiarism” has prevailed from 1990 onwards, focusing on families and not on women" - Andrea Peto

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR!

$ 1,414,700,000
Military expenditure
Hungary spends USD$1,414,700,000 on the military, including armed forces and peacekeeping forces, defence ministries, paramilitary forces, and military space activities.
Supporting equality at the UN
This amount could fund the systematic and sustained resourcing and deployment of gender and WPS experts in country missions and at UN Headquarters.
NAP 1325
Hungary does not have a National Action Plan for the Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325.
WPS commitments
Hungary made no specific financial commitments on Women, Peace and Security in 2017.

Country / Region profile of: Congo (Kinshasa)

The 2016 Political Agreement of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) committed to holding “free, fair, credible, inclusive, transparent, peaceful” election, consistent with the Constitution, which affirms the “achievement of parity between men and women” in national, provincial and local institutions (Article 14). DRC’s National Action Plan on UN Security Council Resolution 1325 also commits to strengthening women's political participation, preventing and addressing violence against women and institutionalising action on gender equality. However, continued postponement of elections and marginalisation of women’s issues, as well as reprisals against peaceful protests, including against women human rights defenders and peace activists, have provided obstacles to democratic reform, promotion of human rights, including women’s human rights and peace in the DRC. Civil society space is also increasingly shrinking, and human rights defenders face numerous risks. Deteriorating violence in the country has included growing levels of extrajudicial executions and reprisals against human rights defenders, including women human rights defenders. The DRC is not currently ranked on the Global Gender Gap Index (GGI). The DRC ratified the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) in 1986. It voted for the adoption of the Arms Trade Treaty, but has not yet signed or ratified it. In the October 2015 Open Debate on WPS, the DRC did not participate and thus, did not make any commitments on the WPS Agenda. There is no allocated budget for the National Action Plan adopted in 2010, but the military spending in the country in 2017 was of $295.2 million.

“We need to break the silence, seek synergy and build alliances with other organizations, and to do this without fear.” - Chantal Bilulu Myanga

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR!

$ 295,200,000
Military expenditure
The country spends USD$ 295,200,000 on the military, including armed forces and peacekeeping forces, defence ministries, paramilitary forces, and military space activities.
Supporting women's human rights
This amount could be used to fund a justice initiative in South Kivu in DRC which would educate about 5,000,000 women on human rights... four times over
NAP 1325
The Democratic Republic of the Congo NAP does not include an allocated or estimated budget and there are no other financial resource consideration references within the NAP.
WPS commitments
Unknown

Country / Region profile of: Kiribati

Women activists in Kiribati are strengthening partnerships with international and national organisations to eliminate gender-based violence. Kiribati has not been involved in large-scale conflict or war recently. Kiribati acceded to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) in 2004. It is not ranked in the 2017 Global Gender Gap Index (GGI). Kiribati was absent from the vote on the adoption of the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), signed on 25th September 2013, but has not yet ratified it. During the 2017 October Security Council Open Debate, Kiribati made no relevant statements. There is no data on military spending. They have not developed a National Action Plan on the Implementation of Resolution 1325 (2000). Violence against women continues to persist in Kiribati and while the Family Peace Bill passed for enactment in 2014, making violence against women a crime, women's rights activists in Kiribati continue to work for the respect and promotion of women's rights.

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR!

$ 0
Military expenditure
The country spends an unknown amount of money on the military
Investing in peace and gender equality
Kiribati could invest in creation and ongoing funding of a National Action Plan for the Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325.
NAP 1325
Kiribati does not have a National Action Plan for the Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325.
WPS commitments
Kiribati made no specific financial commitments on Women, Peace and Security in 2017.

Country / Region profile of: Kenya

Although Kenya's new 2010 Constitution improved women's rights, Kenyan women continue to face challenges in accessing education, employment, and leadership positions. Kenya has had a long history of conflict with several countries, including Somalia, Sudan, Yemen, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Uganda. Furthermore, Kenya's ethnic diversity has resulted in repeated inter-ethnic violence, including the widespread conflict following the 2007 election. The continuous outburst of conflict in Kenya has disproportionately affected women with forced displacement, escalated sexual and gender-based violence, and widespread HIV/AIDS. Kenya acceded to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) on 9 March 1984 and is ranked 76 out of 144 listed countries in the 2017 Global Gender Gap Index (GGI). In regards to disarmament, Kenya voted for the adoption of the Arms Trade Treaty, but has not yet signed or ratified. In 2017, $964 million was spent by Kenya on its military. On 8 March 2016, International Women’s Day, the Government launched Kenya’s National Action Plan for the implementation of Security Council resolution 1325 (2000). At the 2017 October Security Council Open Debate, Kenya gave a statement affirming support for WPS and stated that they are working on establishing a strong monitoring system for Kenya’s National Action Plan for Women, Peace and Security and, it is setting up a central depository for peace and security data that can be accessed by everyone. Kenyan women activists continue to struggle against the lack of women's participation in the peace process in addition to the long-lasting impacts of conflict.

"We [women] are always in the business of peace, but we are also in the business of war. We are part of the communities that create war, we are part of the families that produce the warriors, we are part of those affected by war." - Atema Eclai

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR!

$ 964,000,000
Military expenditure
Kenya spends USD$964,000,000 on the military, including armed forces and peacekeeping forces, defence ministries, paramilitary forces, and military space activities.
Sending more girls to college
This amount could cover one year of college including room and board for more than 200,000 girls
NAP 1325
The Kenya NAP does not include an allocated or estimated budget and there are no other financial resource consideration references within the NAP.
WPS commitments
Kenya made no specific financial commitments on Women, Peace and Security in 2017.

Country / Region profile of: Honduras

Women peace activists in Honduras played a significant part in the non-violent protest movement of the military coup d'etat in 2009; a movement that was met with brutal suppression by the military and policy. Following the coup, the incidence of abuse and sexual violence against women greatly increased, especially against women who were part of the protest movement and in the demonstrations or in detention. Ironically, even the new female Minister of Women appointed by the defacto government called in the military to beat feminists participating in peaceful rallies. Honduras ratified the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) in 1983 and is ranked 55 out of 144 listed countries in the Global Gender Gap Index (GGI) of 2017. In regards to disarmament, Honduras voted for the adoption of the Arms Trade Treaty, signed on 25 September 2013, but has not yet ratified it. In October 2017, Honduras participated in the Open Debate and gave a statement affirming support for WPS but made no specific commitments. Honduras did not make any financial commitment to the WPS Agenda and does not have a NAP; however, in 2017 Honduras spent $363.3 million on the military. In 2015 Honduran feminist activist, Gladys Lanza, was convicted for defending a woman who accused a Honduran government official of sexual harassment. Despite cases like hers, Honduran women continue to rally for justice and human rights and for a development approach with a gender focus.

“Women are playing a different role in society, breaking the traditional order.” - Daysi Flores

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR!

$ 363,600,000
Military expenditure
Honduras spends USD$363,600,000 on the military, including armed forces and peacekeeping forces, defence ministries, paramilitary forces, and military space activities.
Reforestation
This amount could meaningfully contribute to reforestation initiatives strengthening women's sustainable environments
NAP 1325
Honduras does not have a National Action Plan for the Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325.
WPS commitments
Unknown

Country / Region profile of: Vatican

Women activists would like to see the Holy See (also known as the Vatican) agree with them on the issues of gender equality and women's empowerment. The Holy See is not currently involved in a large-scale conflict or war. It is not a signatory of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) and is not ranked on the 2017 Global Gender Gap Index (GGI). However, this country was one of the first to ratify the Nuclear Ban Treaty. During the 2017 October Open Debate on Women, Peace and Security, the Holy See committed to engage women in their efforts aimed at conflict prevention and resolution, peacemaking and peacebuilding in many parts of the world. Support for women peace advocates from the Catholic Church would greatly influence the progress of the WPS Agenda worldwide.

“As women we have an important role to play for peace. One of the participants said to me: ‘It is so important that you are here. I know the rich contribution a woman can make!’ As we listened to those beautiful prayers and music I recalled the words of the Pope at the Angelus, just a few hours before: the Mother Church and the Mother Mary are ‘both mothers, both women’.” - Margaret Karram

Country / Region profile of: Kazakhstan

The principles of nondiscrimination and gender equality are clearly articulated and included in the country’s development plans, but the realisation of gender-equality goals remains a top-down process characterised by high-level declarative strategies. Kazakhstan, which has experienced significant economic growth in recent years, has been taking a leading role in promoting regional stability and cooperation in Central Asia and is seen as a positive example for the region. However, the country’s progress toward gender equality has not kept pace with its other accomplishments. Kazakhstan has not been involved in large-scale conflict or war recently. Kazakhstan acceded to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) in 1998 and is ranked 52 out of 144 listed countries in the 2017 Global Gender Gap Index (GGI). During the 2015 October Open Debate, Kazakhstan gave a statement affirming support for WPS and expressed the state's determination to develop the National Action Plan on the Implementation of Resolution 1325 (2000). During the 2017 debate, Kazakhstan stated its commitment to WPS, and is focusing on achieving the target of earmarking 15 per cent of its official development assistance for gender mainstreaming. In 2017, $ 1.3 billion was spent by Kazakhstan on its military. Kazakstan has not signed the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT). The growth of Kazakhstan's economy over the years has resulted in the discontinuation of much international aid for women's rights groups, which endures a lack of domestic support and challenges as a result of government restrictions. 

“Maybe it is connected somehow with our mentality and traditions, which influence the role of woman in society and create certain stereotypes. … Politics, however, was always a man’s business where they do not want additional rivals. On top of this, it’s men who decide whether to allow woman to go to politics or not" - Aigul Solovyova

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR!

$ 1,337,000,000
Military expenditure
Kazakhstan spends USD$1,337,000,000 on the military, including armed forces and peacekeeping forces, defence ministries, paramilitary forces, and military space activities.
Sending girls to college
This amount could provide scholarships to fund free college education for many millions of girls.
NAP 1325
Kazakhstan does not have a National Action Plan for the Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325.
WPS commitments
Kazakhstan pledged to give approximately USD$810,000,000 in assistance to refugees and internally displaced persons from Syria and Iraq. In 2017, they have also pledged to earmark 15 per cent of its official development assistance for gender mainstreaming.

Country / Region profile of: Jordan

Women in Jordan struggle against an authoritarian regime to increase political participation, affirmative action measures, and social gender equality. Since Jordan is situated between many countries in conflict it often acts as a "safe zone" for refugees fleeing violence, creating a difficult situation for Jordanian society and women in refugee camps. As of 2017, Jordan ranks 135 out of 144 countries listed in the Global Gender Gap Index. On 1 July 1992, Jordan ratified the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). Jordan has not signed nor ratified the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT). During the 2015 October Open Debate, Jordan gave a statement affirming support for WPS and expressed its committment  to harmonise it with the Sustainable Development Goals, keeping in mind the current regional context, including the constant flow of Syrian refugees, to continue to enhance and guarantee the protection of and respect for the rights of women and girls in its legislation and to promote women’s empowerment so that they may increasingly participate in decision-making. At the 2016 Open Debate, Representatives of Jordan followed up on these commitments, noting that a National Action Plan on the Implementation of UNSCR 1325 has been drafted and that gender-sensitive trainings, consultations, and women participants have all increased in Jordan's peacekeeping contributions. In 2017, Jordan spent $ 1.9 billion on its military. At the 2017 Open Debate, Jordan stated that its draft national plan has been submitted to the Cabinet and will be ratified soon. Jordan estimated the cost of the National Plan and stated that they have allocated a flexible and realistic budget to it. However, they did not mention the budget. Jordan created its first NAP for the period of four years (2018-2021) and has set aside a budget of $7,820,000 for the implementation of the NAP. Both government-sponsored and independent women groups in Jordan continue to lobby and advocate for an improvement of women's rights and general standards of living, and often receive foreign aid for their efforts.

"A woman caring for her children; a woman striving to excel in the private sector; a woman partnering with her neighbors to make their street safer; a woman running for office to improve her country - they all have something to offer, and the more our societies empower women, the more we receive in return." - Queen Rania of Jordan

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR!

$ 1,940,000,000
Military expenditure
Jordan spends USD$1,940,000,000 on the military, including armed forces and peacekeeping forces, defence ministries, paramilitary forces, and military space activities.
Keeping Syrian refugees in school
This amount could provide educational opportunities for 1 million Syrian girl refugees in Zaatari camp for a decade
NAP 1325
Jordan created its first NAP for the period of four years (2018-2021) and has set aside a budget of $7,820,000 for the implementation of the NAP.
WPS commitments
Unknown

Country / Region profile of: Haiti

Although almost half of the households in Haiti are headed by women, patriarchal traditions and social discrimination continue to severely restrict women in Haiti. Haiti has been plagued by violent conflicts, chronic political and economic instability, and multiple natural disasters. The United Nations (UN) Stabilisation Mission in Haiti (MINUTIA) was established pursuant to Security Council Resolution 1542 (2004) and its current authorisation is until 15 April 2019. More recently tensions have risen as the Dominican Republic began mass deportation of some 200,000 undocumented residents of Haitian descent. Haiti ratified the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) on 20 July 1981 and is currently not ranked in the 2017 Global Gender Gap Index (GGI). Haiti has not ratified the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) and currently does not have a NAP for the implementation of UNSCR 1325. In 2017, Haiti spent USD 100,000 on military and defense. Haiti did not participate in the UNSC Open Debate in October 2016, but participated in 2017, without making explicit commitments. Women's groups in Haiti, such as the Poto Mitan, remain dedicated to improve the rights of women and to eliminate all forms of violence and sexual/gender based violence.

“If you don’t specify the broader themes of girls and women, they will naturally be forgotten.” - Carmel Dorie Barbot

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR!

$ 100,000
Military expenditure
Haiti spends USD$100,000 on the military, including armed forces and peacekeeping forces, defence ministries, paramilitary forces, and military space activities.
Investing in peace and gender equality
Haiti could invest in creation and ongoing funding of a National Action Plan for the Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325.
NAP 1325
Haiti does not have a National Action Plan for the Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325.
WPS commitments
Unknown

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