Security Council Open Debate on Women, Peace and Security, October 2011

Friday, October 28, 2011

Overview

On October 28 2011, the Security Council held its annual open debate on Women, Peace and Security (WPS). 64 statements were made during the open debate, including those made by the Secretary-General Ban-ki Moon ; Head of UN Women and Under-Secretary-General Michelle Bachelet; representative of ECOSOC; and Ms. Orzala Ashraf on behalf of the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security (NGOWG). In addition to these speakers and the 15 Council members, 43 other member states or regional bodies made statements.

The theme of the debate was “Women's Participation and Role in Conflict Prevention and Mediation". The annual Secretary-General Report on women and peace and security (S/2011/598) provided details on implementation of SCR 1325 over the last year and for the first time included information on a set of global indicators. The Report also contained good recommendations (see part V of Report), as well as an outline of the UN Strategic Framework on WPS to guide United Nations' implementation of the resolution up to 2020 and to strengthen UN system accountability (see annex of Report). The closed negotiation of the Council resulted in the adoption of the Presidential Statement S/PRST/2011/20.

Outcome Document: Presidential Statement

The closed negotiation of the Council resulted in the adoption of the Presidential Statement S/PRST/2011/20 (a non-binding political statement). Unfortunately, the Statement failed to add any substantial new elements and appears to represent a rather weak use of the presidential statement function, in simply calling for continued focus on increasing women's access to decision-making roles in efforts to prevent, mediate and resolve conflict without responding to many of the concrete recommendations of the Secretary-General's report (S/2011/598).

The Presidential Statement did welcome the Report of the Secretary-General in paragraph 4, however the Council Members could only agree to "take note of" the analysis and recommendation. This political disagreement was referenced by the United Kingdom in their statement, “I regret that because of the opposition of some, we were unable to unreservedly welcome the Secretary-General's report.”

The Debate

The civil society speaker, Ms. Orzala Ashraf Nemat from Afghanistan, speaking on behalf of the NGO Working Group, highlighted the role women can play in achieving sustainable peace and development and presented accordingly, three urgent actions that the United Nations and Member States must take to further women's inclusion in efforts to achieve this aim.

Lacking the historical significance of last year's debate for the 10th anniversary, this debate and parallel events were smaller in scale and scope. The focus of this year's debate was on consolidation and maintaining the momentum under the theme “Women's Participation and Role in Conflict Prevention and Mediation" (as per concept note for the Open Debate circulated by Nigeria, the Security Council President for October). However, rather than maintaining the momentum, most Member States statements seemed to return to more generalized language, away from the strong statements and commitments to action called for in 2010.

The majority of States, with the notable exception of Russia and China, welcomed the report of the Secretary-General. Moreover a majority made particular reference to the inclusion of indicators for better monitoring and reporting of progress on implementation. France for example highlighted the utility of indicators in both assessing results and “identifying shortcomings in women's participation in conflict prevention and resolution” and Austria suggested furthermore, that these indicators be used to not only monitor the UN strategic framework, but to track efforts at the national level. By contrast, India intimated that although they had acknowledged the current set of indicators, it was their belief that further discussion and “intergovernmental consultation” was needed on the final makeup of indicators before they could support their full adoption. The recommendations of the report of the Secretary-General were also generally acknowledged. Many countries emphasized the utility of the UN strategic framework.

The need to advance women's participation in mediation was a consistent matter addressed, with representatives mentioning the critical and essential impact that women can and do have in the resolution of peace. There were many strong reference on this important issue including Croatia stating that, “the inclusion of women and gender expertise in peacebuilding activities is essential to reconstituting political, legal, cultural and socio- economic and social structures. Gender equality brings new degrees of democratic inclusiveness to peacebuilding, faster and more durable economic growth, and human and social capital recovery”.

Similarly emphasized was the essential role that women can and must play in efforts to prevent conflict, with most speakers including the Secretary-General calling on the UN to lead by example by creating more roles for women in preventative diplomacy and peacekeeping. Most statements recognized that progress had been particularly slow in this area. Senegal noted the relationship between proliferation of small arms and prevalence of gender based violence and expressed its desire for the achievement of a “robust arms trade treaty” at the diplomatic conference to be held in 2012. Certain States did come forward with positive initiatives in the area of prevention, for example, Liberia where women are able to convene in a safe place and also to monitor the early warning signs of conflict and lead peaceful demonstrations on issues that affect their well-being.

Please click here for Peacewomen's FULL commentary on the debate.

Please click here to view Part One; Part Two; Part Three of the live webcast.

Speakers

UN, NGO & Security Council

AM speakers

PM speakers

  • UN Secretary-General
  • UNWomen
  • ECOSOC
  • NGO Working Group
  • Brazil
  • UK
  • South Africa
  • India
  • Gabon
  • Colombia
  • BiH
  • Germany
  • US
  • Lebanon
  • Portugal
  • China
  • Russian Federation
  • France
  • Nigeria
 
  • Austria
  • Canada
  • Republic of Korea
  • Liechtenstein
  • Maldives
  • Australia
  • Israel
  • Japan
  • Tunisia
  • Italy
  • Luxembourg
  • Switzerland
  • Argentina
  • EU
  • Angola
  • Senegal
  • Ukraine
  • Netherlands
  • Solomon Islands
  • Estonia
  • Burundi
  • Ireland
  • Turkey
  • Nepal
  • Bangladesh
  • Kenya
  • Sudan
  • Kyrgyzstan
  • Chile
  • Peru
  • NATO
  • Spain
  • Indonesia
  • Croatia
  • Lithuania
  • Vanuatu
  • Armenia
  • Angola
  • Timor-Leste
  • Liberia
  • Kazakhstan
  • Mexico
  • Afghanistan
  • Fiji
 
 
Resources: 

Concept Note: Open Debate on WPS Oct 2011

What's In Blue Preview of WPS Debate

Security Council Report Overview of Debate on WPS

SG Briefing to Open Debate on Women, Peace and Security

NGO Working Group Statement, Open Debate WPS, 2011

Report of the Secretary-General on WPS, Oct 2011

Open Debate on Women, Peace and Security; Presidential Statement

Press Release: Open Debate on WPS

Please choose

General Women, Peace and Security
  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    The Council has consistently recognized the significance of women in preventing, managing and resolving conflict, including as recently as through two important recent resolutions, resolution 2014 (2011) on Yemen and resolution 2009 (2011) on Libya.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    Women's participation in conflict prevention and preventive diplomacy is crucial to achieving peace, as the Security Council highlights in its decision to mark the 11th anniversary of Resolution 1325 on “Women and Peace and Security”.

  • Country

    Sudan
  • Extracts

    I should like to reiterate my congratulations to you, Madam, as you crown your presidency of the Security Council by devoting this open debate to the issue of women and peace and security 11 years after the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), on the basis of which the United Nations has adopted a strategic framework and standard indicators to assess the implementation of the resolution and its time frame at the regional and international levels, as reflected in the report of the Secretary-General (S/2011/598*) before us. On this occasion, we evoke the need to push forward in implementing resolution 1325 (2000) in the coming decade by adopting comprehensive and cohesive regional action plans. In that respect, we note the importance of strengthening the capacities of countries emerging from conflict, especially given the fact that the issue of women and peace and security has become one of the most prominent items on the Council's agenda over the past decade.

  • Country

    Sudan
  • Extracts

    The situation of women in armed conflict is closely linked to the integrated efforts to deal with the root causes of conflicts. We therefore agree with what is stated in the report as regards the plan of action, which is based on the principle of dealing with the root causes of conflict, including poverty, lack of development, climate change, and given the fact that in the end, war is war. Wherever war occurs, its negative consequences affect vulnerable sectors of society, including women and children. My country therefore once again stresses the fact that a comprehensive and sustainable political settlement to conflict is central to addressing the issue of women in conflict situations.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    My country continues to attach particular importance to the issue and would like to underscore its commitment to promoting the rights of women, particularly women in conflict situations, as well as to promoting the full implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in all its aspects.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    It is clear that resolution 1325 (2000) has defined a framework of standards guiding United Nations efforts on policies for integrating gender issues into the whole of the work of the Organization.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    National ownership of resolution 1325 (2000) is the best way to ensure its effective implementation, given that primary responsibility for combating rape as a weapon of war falls to Member States, whose duty it is to urgently take measures to deal with this phenomenon, measures that educate as well as enforce. Tunisia has already launched a national action plan for implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). In particular, it promotes training women in peacekeeping and peacebuilding so that we can deploy qualified personnel in United Nations operations on the ground.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    Tunisia intends to continue implementing that resolution as apart of its comprehensive approach to gender equality and the empowerment of women, and will make itself available to the United Nations concerning any aspect of implementing resolution 1325 (2000) and other international instruments dealing with the welfare of women and their participation in decision-making processes, as well as promoting a culture of respect for women.

  • Country

    Bangladesh
  • Extracts

    Eleven years ago, the Security Council adopted the landmark resolution 1325 (2000) on women and peace and security. Thereafter, several resolutions, such as resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010), have been adopted to buttress the process initiated in resolution 1325 (2000). We are, however, disappointed to note that violence against women and girls continues, as detailed in various reports. As we have mentioned in the past, women and girls suffer most as victims of conflict, while in the peace process they are mostly deprived of the dividends. Therefore, the onus lies on us to ensure that the oppression of women and girls, particularly that based on gender, is stopped forever.

  • Country

    Kenya
  • Extracts

    Last year, we commemorated 10 years since the Council unanimously adopted resolution 1325 (2000). That resolution, together with other international instruments, constitutes the basis for cooperation among all actors engaged in this field and contributes to the wider agenda of gender equality and empowerment of women.

  • Country

    Kenya
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, I wish to once again reiterate Kenya's commitment to implementing resolution 1325 (2000). In so doing, we must ensure greater coherence and coordination in addressing women's issues in conflict and post-conflict situations in a holistic manner. I emphasize once again that the establishment of UN-Women accords us a very strong platform for addressing issues affecting women in general, and the acceleration of the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in particular. It is Kenya's expectation that UN-Women will rise to the challenge expeditiously.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    Women must continue to be represented and actively consulted in the ongoing reform processes. They must have a place at the side of their male counterparts in order to successfully carry out the transition to democracy and establish regimes that are fairer and more respectful of the freedoms of their peoples. This is about the success of the ongoing political transitions and, consequently, about the stability of the countries themselves and, in turn, about the security of the region.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    Research by the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security reveals that the Council does not consistently apply the principles of the women, peace and security agenda in its country-specific work.

  • Country

    Ukraine
  • Extracts

    The eleventh anniversary of resolution 1325 (2000) is an opportunity to strengthen the global agenda on women and peace and security. We welcome the latest report of the Secretary-General on this issue (S/2011/598*) and take positive note of its recommendations. My country remains fully committed to the implementation of resolutions 1325 (2000), 1820 (2008) and 1888 (2009).

    Ukraine considers that ensuring gender equality, gender mainstreaming and the empowerment of women is not only an important objective, but is also an essential part of the pursuit of democracy and development. In recognition of the essential contribution of women towards achieving those objectives, Ukraine co-sponsored a draft resolution on women and political participation.

  • Country

    Ukraine
  • Extracts

    Ukraine recognizes the instrumental role that a stronger United Nations gender architecture could play in advancing women's rights. It is a great responsibility for my country to be represented on the Executive Board of UN-Women. Ukraine's activity in this entity is focused on implementing policies and practices that seek to reduce gender inequality in all its manifestations in every sphere of life, including decision-making and leadership, the elimination of violence against women and girls, and trafficking in women and girls. We welcome the Council's efforts to pay special attention to the concrete needs of women and girls affected by armed conflicts in such spheres as health, education, legal support, and water and sanitation.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    The Arab Spring has shown that the threats to security and to women and girls in particular are changing constantly. In our work on Women, Peace and Security we must be flexible enough to respond to new threats and challenges as they emerge. There are sweeping and positive social and economic trends at work. This Council needs to show that we are responsive to these trends. On this, as on other issues, we should demonstrate that we are on the right side of history. In particular, we must ensure that new governing structures that emerge in the aftermath of conflict do not undermine women's roles and participation in society, and that the same opportunities are available to men and women.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    As a member of the “Group of Friends of Security Council Resolution 1325” Germany has always attached great importance to all aspects of the issue “Women and Peace and Security” – in particular to turn, 11 years after the adoption of this ground breaking resolution, words into action. Therefore, we applaud the timely decision of the Nobel Prize Committee to honor three courageous and inspirational women who are exemplary models of how women can make a difference. Germany very much welcomes the Secretary General's comprehensive report and the analysis and recommendations it contains, including the strategic framework and the first set of indicators which he brought forward.

  • Country

    Solomon Is.
  • Extracts

    Our concern is that the United Nations gender- supported early warning system initiative, initiated years back, unfortunately did not grow roots nationally and went silent after completion of the project. In that regard, we have been calling for an enhanced United Nations presence in Solomon Islands to ensure that there is a permanent partnership in transferring projects within the country.

    Nationally, two ministries are leading the charge in implementing resolution 1325 (2000), namely, the Ministry of National Unity, Reconciliation and Peace and the Ministry of Women, Youth and Children's Affairs. Their work on gender goes beyond resolution 1325 (2000), as has been clarified in the concept paper (S/2011/654, annex). It covers the other resolutions, 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010).

  • Country

    Solomon Is.
  • Extracts

    We are in a transitional phase of providing and improving women's access to food, water, health, education and economic opportunities. The Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2011-2020 has a gender orientation to it. It calls for investment in the productive sector within our countries, especially in infrastructure, agriculture and energy, with the ambitious goal to transform and graduate 50 per cent of LDCs by 2020. As my colleague from Vanuatu will state later on, the Pacific SIDS are developing a regional action plan on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), which will be complemented by a national action plan. On that note, Solomon Islands wishes to register its appreciation to UN-Women, which has provided financing to assist us in working on our national action plan.

  • Country

    Solomon Is.
  • Extracts

    My delegation is mindful of the deep gaps within resolution 1325 (2000), as it deals merely with peace and security, not development. Our reading of the resolution is that it engages women becoming agents of change in conflict prevention, management and peacebuilding, acting as fire-fighters putting out fires without looking at the causes of conflict. Peace and security, however, can be sustained by having a sustainable development context to them.

  • Country

    Burundi
  • Extracts

    To implement resolution 1325 (2000), the Government of Burundi has decided that no strategy will be adopted or implemented without taking into clear account the gender dimension, so as to guarantee the full participation of women in decision-making, in prioritizing plans of action and in implementing them. As things stand, our National Plan of Action on resolution 1325 (2000) has been drafted and its adoption by the Council of Ministers is expected next month. The plan is designed to respond to the Government's national and international priorities, which are reflected in national policy documents, such as the “Strategic Framework for Combating Poverty, Second Generation”, “Vision 2025” and the revised version of the national gender policy. The substance of resolution 1325 (2000) on women and peace and security is chiefly built around four pillars — participation, prevention, protection and recovery. In terms of participation in decision-making, Burundi has made significant progress. For example, the 30 per cent rate stipulated by the country's Constitution has been exceeded during the post- election nominations in 2010. Nine of the 21 ministerial positions are currently held by women — equal to 43 per cent. With that percentage Burundi leads the rest of Africa. Our rate of women's representation in the Senate places Burundi in first place in Africa and in second place worldwide, after Bolivia.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Women are vulnerable in conflict situations and therefore require special attention. Women can make unique contributions to the maintenance of international peace and security, and their potentials must be further tapped. The Security Council's adoption of resolution 1325 (2000) was important progress in the efforts of the international community to protect women's rights and interests. However, there remains a lot to do in comprehensively implementing that resolution. I wish to emphasize four points.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    For a start, I would like to emphasize that women's security is part of overall peace and security and that women can contribute to peace processes and are very able to do so. The involvement of women in peacekeeping operations and conflict prevention is of the utmost importance to ensure the success of the operations, as it is the only way to reach the whole population.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    The indicators and strategic framework in the reports of the Secretary-General contribute to identifying the gaps and addressing those limitations in a more systematic manner. Japan, for its part, will continue to do its utmost to close the implementation gaps before the fifteenth anniversary of resolution 1325 (2000), in cooperation with our partners and, in particular, with women's organizations and civil society.

  • Country

    Senegal
  • Extracts

    My delegation has a special interest in the topic, because resolution 1325 (2000) represented an enormous step forward in the protection of women and highlighted the importance of their role in all aspects of United Nations peacekeeping. Nonetheless, while it has remained far from being a cure-all, resolution 1325 (2000) has contributed, along with resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009) and 1889 (2009), to improving the normative framework for preventing gender-based violence and for protecting women against that scourge. It should, however, be pointed out that, despite those praiseworthy efforts, persistent shortcomings have exposed thousands of women and girls to various types of barbaric abuse and atrocities. In fact, rape continues to be used as a weapon of war in certain conflict areas, and the ongoing existence of sexual and gender-based violence, even at the end of a conflict, represents an almost permanent threat to the security and health of that vulnerable group of the population. That is why the international community must firmly commit to vigorously combating impunity in order to guarantee the effective prevention of all forms of violence against women.

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    Our country welcomes the report of the Secretary- General (S/2011/598*), which comprehensively reflects the important role that women play in preventive diplomacy, peace negotiation processes, and post-conflict reconstruction. The merit of resolution 1325 (2000) is specifically that the Security Council recognizes therein the key role that women can play as protagonists in peace processes. The international community must pool its efforts to ensure that this protagonist role remains possible. We are convinced that lasting peace can be attained only if women participate in all phases of peace processes. We therefore welcome the idea of compiling lists of women candidates to mediate conflicts.

  • Country

    Nepal
  • Extracts

    With the support and cooperation of all, we intend to translate our commitments into actions. Ensuring the effective implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) will have a long-term salutary impact on the international community as a whole. It ensures the rightful place of women as peacemakers, peacebuilders and peacekeepers in this turbulent world. That is what we need the most at this time. This debate is therefore a step forward in charting our course for the effective implementation of resolution 1325 (2000).

Conflict Prevention
  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    We also recognize the importance of the concept note (S/2011/654, annex) prepared by the delegation of Nigeria, where proper emphasis is placed on the participation and role of women in conflict prevention and mediation.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    We agree with the Secretary-General that UN-Women constitutes the cornerstone for articulating the mandates of the United Nations system in promoting gender equality and the empowerment of women. In this context, we emphasize the role that broad and inclusive intergovernmental consultations have in evaluating the gender architecture and the advancement of women, as well as the agreements between States on models and practices adopted in that area. All of that is an essential element for progress in improving national capacity to generate greater participation of women in conflict prevention and mediation.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    I would like to highlight the fact that the report of the Secretary-General notes progress made in Colombia in connection with the four aspects of resolution 1325 (2000), namely, prevention, participation, protection and relief and recovery. I think that it is also important to highlight other important actions that are being pursued in these areas in my country on the basis of our conviction that the phenomenon of violence against women includes domestic violence, violence committed in the context of the community and violence caused by illegal armed groups.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    In terms of prevention, Colombia's armed forces have incorporated into their training programmes courses in the prevention of gender-based violence, sexual violence, sexual and reproductive health, sexual and reproductive rights and gender equality.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    The adoption of resolution 1325 (2000) was hailed as a landmark and groundbreaking resolution. For the first time, the importance of women's full participation in conflict prevention, conflict resolution and peacebuilding at all levels was recognized. Since then, the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and its sister resolutions have paved the way for the mainstreaming of the gender perspective in United Nations peacekeeping operations and missions worldwide. In a similar vein, the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, which also addresses women and armed conflict, should continue to be implemented. Those various international frameworks on women are complementary and mutually reinforce our efforts to protect the rights of women in conflict situations.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    Our annual debate on women and peace and security is built upon various premises, among them, first, that women in conflict are often victims and shoulder multiple consequences of conflict, and secondly, that despite being vulnerable, in many instances women in conflict have continued to demonstrate their transformative role and their potential for creating sustainable peace. Indonesia shares the common view that through the promotion of women's role as agents of peace, their plight as victims of conflict can be overcome. Embedded in that common view is the paramount importance of conflict prevention.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    In this context, our efforts in waging peace should nurture an environment that accommodates the contribution of women to conflict prevention. That would mean, among other things, enhancing women's participation in decision-making processes, building a culture of peace that respects life, and promoting a way of life that values non-violence and dialogue and is characterized by cooperation and social responsibility.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    In a peaceful atmosphere, women can fulfil their role as transmitters of values, as economic resource managers and as solidarity supporters and networkers. If they have the space to build networks, women can encourage social and political groups to take preventive measures before conflicts break out. Given their unique perspectives and insights on women in conflict, the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) would benefit by the presence of more women in formal institutions of conflict prevention and resolution, including in preventive diplomacy and mediation efforts.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    But women are not just victims. They are often the key to preventing conflict and violence from emerging, to resolving conflict and to rebuilding societies once guns fall silent.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    The Council has consistently recognized the significance of women in preventing, managing and resolving conflict, including as recently as through two important recent resolutions, resolution 2014 (2011) on Yemen and resolution 2009 (2011) on Libya.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    Of course, when we talk about conflict prevention we are talking not just about involving women in preventive diplomacy. We also speak of the much broader agenda of ensuring that drivers of conflict do not have the chance to surface. Democratic institutions, the rule of law and economic development are foundations of peaceful societies. We cannot expect such societies to flourish without embracing the role that women play in shaping them.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    South Africa welcomes the convening of this important meeting. The adoption of the historic resolution 1325 (2000) 11 years ago was a significant milestone in the recognition of the role that women can play in the maintenance of international peace and security, particularly in decision-making processes relating to conflict prevention and resolution. In light of that achievement, South Africa is encouraged by the various frameworks that have been created to ensure the implementation of that resolution, in particular the creation of UN-Women under the leadership of Ms. Michele Bachelet.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Indeed, inroads have been made in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), as highlighted in the Secretary-General's report (S/2011/598*). However, let us be clear that gaps remain in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), as well as glaring disparities pertaining to the role of women in preventive diplomacy, formal peace processes and mediation. We therefore welcome the institutional and policy frameworks elaborated in the Secretary-General's report, in particular his seven point action plan for gender-responsive peacebuilding, which seeks to establish standard operating procedures for gender issues in the United Nations, conflict resolution and peacebuilding architecture.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    We further welcome the practical recommendations and the strategic results framework outlined in the Secretary-General's report, which constitute a concrete proposal to include women in conflict prevention and mediation. In particular, we wish to highlight the importance of nominating women to lead negotiation processes and increasing the number of women in the foreign services and security establishments.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Women also suffer disproportionately from poverty. An important dimension in advancing peace and preventing conflict is to ensure greater and more equitable economic justice and development. Despite advances in positioning women to assume leadership roles in conflict prevention and mediation, those advances will be meaningless if the root causes of conflict, which are by and large developmental in nature, are not sufficiently addressed.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    The conflict-prevention and mitigation efforts of women through civil society and governmental channels deserve our increased financial, political and technical support. Civil society participation serves a double aim: it fosters inclusive dialogue and development. It also builds the capacity of women to engage in more formal processes. Increasing the number of women in Government structures, for example in the security and justice sectors, makes such institutions more democratic, gender-responsive and accountable. This contributes to conflict prevention.

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    As members know, two years ago Gabon underwent a political transition that was outstandingly led by two women, one the President of the Senate and the other the President of the Constitutional Court. When Ali Bongo Ondimba, President of the Gabonese Republic, addressed the sixty-sixth session of the General Assembly, he recalled the high priority Gabon gives to the effective participation of women in mediation and conflict prevention (see A/66/PV.16). A few weeks ago, we welcomed the awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize to three women: Mrs. Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, President of Liberia, Ms. Leymah Gbowee, Liberian activist, and Ms. Tawakkul Karman, Yemeni activist. This year, those three women clearly embody the very issue we are discussing.

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    In the matter under discussion, three areas seem to us essential for coherent and fruitful action. First, we must strengthen our normative framework at the international, regional and national levels. Secondly, we must work to strengthen capacities, especially through peacekeeping missions and in the post-conflict peacebuilding and reconstruction phase. Finally, we must establish a stronger link between the protection of women and children and the prevention of armed conflict by focusing on the root causes of those conflicts.

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    We note that much progress has been made in developing a normative framework to strengthen the action of the international community. Resolution 1325 (2000) is the foundation of that structure. That foundation has expanded and now forms a body with resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010). Together, those resolutions offer the Council and the international community as a whole a vast body of values and principles that can guide our action in matters of participation, protection, capacity building and the fight against impunity, but also in the rehabilitation and reintegration of women in society in the context of peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    An important aspect of our debate is the link between preventive diplomacy and the Council's initiatives to promote the role of women in peace processes. More than 10 years of continued efforts to implement resolution 1325 (2000) have revealed the limits of a reactive approach. Gabon supports a more comprehensive approach aimed at incorporating conflict prevention as a fundamental part of an effective strategy to protect women and young girls from the agony of conflict and war. Through such a strategy, women would have leading roles, which of course entails women playing a part in the policy sphere in peacetime so that they can be fully involved in the different stages of mediation and political negotiation in times of crisis. In this regard, regional and sub-regional organizations, namely African organizations, should also adopt such a strategy. The African Union's incorporation of gender parity in the highest positions of its hierarchy is a strong indication of a move in that direction.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    Women's participation in conflict prevention and preventive diplomacy is crucial to achieving peace, as the Security Council highlights in its decision to mark the 11th anniversary of Resolution 1325 on “Women and Peace and Security”.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    Those opportunities, however, can be enhanced significantly depending on how the international community sets its priorities for recovery and uses its strategies for peacebuilding. Those priorities should consist of specific national and international policies aimed at increasing women's participation in conflict prevention and resolution, mediation, peace negotiations and peacebuilding. The integrationof the resolution has to be country-driven, and Member States need to take responsibility for its success by ensuring that it is integrated into national policies. We urge countries to apply a broad gendermainstreaming approach across Government, for instance through a system-wide approach that links development, humanitarian and defence issues. All plans should include civil society consultations, as well as monitoring and reporting mechanisms.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    As a country with authentic experience in the field of conflict prevention and resolution, as well as mediation and peacebuilding, Croatia is actively contributing to the realization of the objective of the resolution during both times of conflict and times of peace. As a way of contributing to international peace and security, Croatia is increasingly taking part in peacekeeping operations, thereby informing
    our perception of the role of women in preserving peace as special and unique. The lack of women's empowerment poses a major setback to the full achievement of human rights and overall economic and political development and progress.

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    Although Ms. Bachelet aptly highlighted the modest progress made by Member States and the United Nations in advancing the agenda of resolution 1325 (2000), we must heed her warning that we are very far from sufficiently and systematically integrating women into the process of conflict prevention and peacebuilding. We believe that this is an auspicious moment in the history of the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). The draft presidential statement that is to be adopted today could not have come at a better time, coming as it does in the aftermath of the recognition by the Nobel Committee of the role and participation of the three eminent women in conflict resolution and peace processes in their respective communities. While congratulating President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, Ms. Leymah Gbowee and Ms. Tawakkul Karman for their groundbreaking achievement, we share the hope of the Nobel Committee that this recognition of the important place of women in the peace process, which the draft presidential statement echoes loudly, is a watershed moment and paradigm shift in the global effort to implement resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    We note with satisfaction that the draft presidential statement accords with the theme of this open debate, namely, “The role and participation of women in conflict prevention and mediation”. Through the draft presidential statement, the Council recognizes that women can, and do, play crucial roles in the prevention of conflict. Nevertheless, it also notes that more needs to be done to create the enabling conditions for the participation of women in all stages of the peace process.

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    Such efforts at creating the right conditions for ensuring women's full participation should include increasing the participation and representation of women in preventive diplomacy initiatives. It should also include strengthening the capacities of the relevant Government institutions and women's organizations involved with conflict and post-conflict issues, the adequate representation of women in the negotiation and implementation of peace agreements, support for local women's peace initiatives, the promotion and protection of the human rights of women, higher levels of representation in decision-making roles, and ensuring proper coherence and coordination among the United Nations entities responsible for implementing the women, peace and security agenda in the entire United Nations system.

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    Nigeria is also committed to fulfilling its obligations under the African Charter of Human and Peoples' Rights on the rights of women in Africa. As Ms. Bachelet has often said, the obstacles to women's political participation, which I believe have a direct bearing on their capacity to play an active role in preventive diplomacy and conflict prevention, are indeed enormous. Violence, poverty, lack of access to education and health care, and limited economic opportunities all combine to undermine the role of women and girls in conflict prevention, peace negotiations and peacebuilding. It is therefore necessary that we develop and take measures to address these inherent obstacles. Promoting women's equality and empowerment is, in our view, one of the best ways to address the root causes of conflict and therefore prevent such conflict. I envisage a presidential statement along those lines in the near future.

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    We recognize the relevance and relationship between the Council's preventive diplomacy initiatives and its women, peace and security agenda. As women are usually some of the first and worst hit in any conflict, preventing conflicts from breaking out serves to ensure the peace and security of women and girls. Even as we all remain true to the provisions of resolution 1325 (2000), which focuses on armed coflict and post-conflict situations, it has become imperative to devote equal attention to conflict prevention strategies, including the use of preventive diplomacy. It is gratifying to know that the Council has the opportunity every year to review the progress made in implementation of resolution 1325 (2000)

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    Peru believes that the high-level review of the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) proposed for 2015 will be an opportunity to comprehensively review the progress made by the United Nations system and by Member States in the priority areas of prevention, participation, protection, relief and recovery, as well as on the recommendations put forward by the Secretary-General or by a working group established to implement the resolution.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    It is also important to recognize that there is now great awareness of the many types of violence inflicted on women in conflict, and that significant attempts have been made to address them. Since the primary victims of armed conflict are women, along with children and the elderly, it is important that they take on a key role in peacekeeping and peacebuilding and, even more urgently, in the process of prevention, to which it is never too late to devote special attention.

  • Country

    Bangladesh
  • Extracts

    In the maintenance of international peace and security, we take pride in our modest contribution of troops and police forces to United Nations peacekeeping missions. The recruitment of women to the police forces and the military amply demonstrates our commitment to women's empowerment in both the national and the international arenas. We are pleased that we were able to deploy a full contingent — an all- female formed police unit — to the friendly country of Haiti following the devastating earthquake there. I am pleased to report that our all-male troop contingents are fully briefed on gender issues. We provide the necessary on-the-job training to reinforce their understanding and sensitivity in that regard. We are aware that we need to mainstream a gender perspective into all conflict prevention activities and strategies, develop effective gender-sensitive early warning mechanisms and institutions and strengthen efforts to prevent violence against women, including various forms of gender-based violence.

  • Country

    Kenya
  • Extracts

    Prevention is undoubtedly the cornerstone of any strategy to address the challenges that society faces. We note with satisfaction the various actions that have been undertaken by Member States, the United Nations system, civil society and other actors in implementing resolution 1325 (2000). We believe that countries must systematically integrate and mainstream women- specific issues in their action plans in order to tackle the growing problem of sexual and gender-based violence during conflict and even in peacetime. In this regard, it is important that more support be extended to countries in order to buttress preventive measures and support their institutions to combat these vices.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    More than a decade has passed since the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000). Throughout that period, the United Nations system, regional organizations, Member States and civil society have made significant efforts to adapt the resolution to local settings through a wide spectrum of measures and initiatives. Progress has been made in terms of discourse and evolving practice on the participation of women in conflict prevention, resolution and peacebuilding, and awareness has increased of the threat that sexual violence constitutes to peace and security.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    Despite important national, regional and international efforts, however, the conditions that women and girls still face in situations of armed conflict continue to be abhorrent. The benefits of resolution 1325 (2000) have yet to reach most women in conflict and in fragile settings. In that regard, allow me to make the following comments. First, we view the prevention of conflict as a crucial element of resolution 1325 (2000). That includes the prevention of all forms of conflict-related violence against women and girls. Sexual violence remains the least-condemned war crime in peace agreements and beyond. The elimination of impunity is perhaps the single most effective preventive tool to fight that crime. In that regard, reforming the security sector and ensuring respect for the rule of law in a gender-responsive manner is of crucial importance. Conflict and post-conflict societies should be assisted in those areas as early as possible. The preventive aspect of resolution 1325 (2000) also includes women's full and equal involvement in conflict prevention efforts. We concur with the Secretary-General's report (S/2011/598*) that more attention needs to be paid to women's roles in the field. We support his recommendation for the Council to use its deliberations on preventive diplomacy and mediation to consider means of enhancing the role of women in conflict prevention.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    Today, women's community peace huts in counties around the country are venues for conflict mediation and resolution. They also serve as safe havens for women escaping domestic violence and as counselling centres for survivors of sexual and gender- based violence. In the peace huts, women address child support issues and work with local police to identify suspects who have committed crimes against women, so as to ensure their arrest and interrogation. Women also monitor the early warning signs of conflict and lead peaceful demonstrations on issues that affect their well-being.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    Since the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), discussions have revealed many examples of women's effective contribution to conflict prevention, peace processes and peacebuilding in the various regions of the world. Women bear the consequences of conflict and are thus well placed to contribute to solutions. Having reached this realization, our common challenge is to find creative means to institutionalize this role at the national and international levels. Women must be capacitated and strategically positioned to play their rightful role.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    Liberia is moving deliberately and purposefully towards the fulfilment of its commitments to women's advancement. There has been a gradual increase in women's presence in leadership and decision-making positions at the central and local Government levels. Gender-responsive policies, strategies and programmes, some of which are mentioned in the Secretary-General's report, are being integrated into all sectors of national action. In 2009, Liberia became one of the first countries to have completed its national action plans for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). This progress has been made possible through the consistent and much-appreciated support of development partners. All the same, inadequate resources remain a challenge and hindrance to robust implementation.
    We are encouraged by the recognition that has been accorded internationally to the modest achievements made by Liberia in its efforts to meaningfully involve women in national governance and to build and utilize their productive capacities, including for the consolidation of peace. Mindful that food security has a conflict preventive dimension, I cannot fail to mention that the Hunger Project's prestigious 2011 Africa Prize for Leadership was awarded a few days ago to the Liberian Minister of Agriculture, Ms. Florence Chenoweth, for her dedication to improving the livelihoods and food security of women farmers in Liberia.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    Liberia pledges to make more concerted efforts to comply with reporting requirements so as to contribute meaningfully to future reports of the Secretary-General on women and peace and security. The presence of UN-Women in Liberia provides the needed support to national efforts to implement resolution 1325 (2000) and reduce gender inequities. We therefore look forward to continued partnership with UN-Women towards the enhancement of women's empowerment, peacebuilding and sustainable development. It is our hope that, in the not too distant future, the capacities of women will be so fully integrated into the global peace architecture that the focus of debates on conflict prevention and mediation will not be on women's role and participation but simply on the subject matter.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    Through the adoption by the Security Council of resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions, the United Nations has been able to develop, integrate and fine-tune the tools available to it to address a gender perspective in a multidimensional manner, by recognizing the importance of women's active participation in the various stages of conflict prevention and resolution, as well as in peacekeeping, reconstruction and peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    We are also concerned about the low level of participation by women in peace negotiations. The exclusion of women and the lack of experts in gender matters in negotiations perpetuate inequality. As is indicated in the current report of the Secretary-General, issues related to women tend to be addressed at the later stages of conflict prevention and mediation. The Nobel Peace Prize that was awarded to outstanding women in this field this year undoubtedly sends a positive message, but it is nonetheless insufficient.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    It seems to us more important than ever that the Security Council address the issue of women's role and participation in conflict prevention and mediation. The Arab Spring has served to forcefully remind us of that. Women have been significant actors in the transitions that have occurred in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya. In Syria and Yemen women are today continuing to fight with exceptional courage to defend their freedom, to ensure that the most fundamental human rights are respected and to make their calls for democracy heard. In this connection, I wish to welcome this year's awarding of the Noble Peace Prize to three exceptional women who are doing outstanding work in the service of peace and human rights.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    I would like to thank the Secretary-General for his recent report (S/2011/598*). We agree with the bulk of its analyses. We would also like to commend the work done by UN-Women under the leadership of Ms. Bachelet. The strategic framework and follow-up indicators referred to in the report are useful tools, both for Member States and for the United Nations, in following up the implementation of the resolution on women and peace and security. Not only do they make it possible to assess results, but also to identify shortcomings in women's participation in conflict prevention and resolution. They also make it possible to refocus the efforts of the international community to ensure better protection for women in armed conflict.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    The prevention of the violation of women and girls' human rights, including sexual violence, must enjoy the highest priority. It is high time that we bring war criminals to justice, end impunity for their atrocities, and invest in immediate service and assistance mechanisms for women and girl war crime victims. Our focus must also be on including women in peace processes as mediators, members of negotiating parties, and signatories to peace agreements.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    The flagship agency on gender — UN-Women — has begun to prove its leadership in theimplementation of resolution 1325 (2000) through United Nations system-wide coherence. It has been able to pulled together a set of key universal and regional human rights instruments. The focus on women and peace and security can be further strengthenedthrough collaboration with humanitarian, human rights and aid- to-development agencies, and the defence forces of concerned United Nations Member States, as well as with all categories of women, including activists, war victims, refugees, asylum-seekers and migrants. To conclude, we must go forward to strengthen resolution 1325 (2000), structured on the three main pillars of participation, protection and prevention, and is a most powerful tool for women's organizing, mobilization and action.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Lithuania attaches particular importance to conflict prevention. We support the first General Assembly resolution on strengthening the role of mediation in the peaceful settlement of disputes (resolution65/283), which, inter alia, advocates the enhanced role of women in peace mediation. We welcome the joint strategy on gender and mediation launched by the Department of Political Affairs and UNWomen, and look forward to its further implementation.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Successive chairmanships of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), including that of Lithuania, have sought to include gender issues within the scope of OSCE activities related to peace and security. Ministerial Council Decision 14/05 builds in part on resolution 1325 (2000) and calls for engaging women in conflict prevention, crisis management and post-conflict rehabilitation. In October, the OSCE held a major conference in Sarajevo entitled “UNSCR 1325: Moving Beyond Theory to Maximize Security in the OSCE”. This year, the Lithuanian OSCE Chairman-in-Office appointed his Special Representative on Gender Issues, Ms. Wendy Patten, to coordinate implementation of the 2004 OSCE Action Plan for the Promotion of Gender Equality.

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    The history of resolution 1325 (2000), more than ten years of it, has clearly confirmed in practice the key role and significance of this instrument for advancing the role of women in conflict prevention and resolution and in post-conflict reconstruction and also in protecting women during conflicts. In that regard we express how pleased we are that this year the issue of women's participation in preventive diplomacy is given priority attention in the Council's presidential statement.

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    As we have said on many occasions, in various forums and events, women must not be seen just as victims in armed conflicts. That in itself would be a form of discrimination. An important precondition for eliminating discrimination against women in such situations is their full participation in all related aspects of preventive diplomacy. Women can and must make a more significant contribution to conflict prevention and resolution.

  • Country

    Ukraine
  • Extracts

    The focus of today's debate on the participation and role of women in conflict prevention and mediation could not be more timely. Ukraine has always stressed the need for the widest possible use of the potential of women in the spheres of preventive diplomacy, peacekeeping and peacebuilding. We believe that there is still much to be done to redress the current underrepresentation of women in decision- making with regard to conflict resolution so as to make their voice heard loud and clear in peace negotiations. In that context, we welcome the adoption of the first-ever resolution on “Strengthening the role of mediation in the peaceful settlement of disputes and conflict prevention and resolution” (General Assembly resolution 65/283). In that document, all Member States resolved to promote the equal, full and effective participation of women at all levels of the peaceful settlement of disputes, conflict prevention and resolution, as well as to provide adequate gender expertise for all mediators and their teams.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    I have three points to make in today's debate: first, support for the role of UN Women and Special Representatives of the Secretary General (SRSG) on Sexual Violence in Conflict; second, the need to do more on conflict prevention and early warning; and finally, the work that the United Kingdom has taken forward through our National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    The Secretary-General's report provides examples of both real progress and the challenges ahead of us. We welcome the initiative of DPKO and DPA to include gender components, advisors, or focal points in all field missions on this issue. We're pleased that a gender and mediation specialist has been appointed to the Standby Team of Mediation Experts to ensure that women's concerns are addressed in conflict prevention and resolution, and not just toward the end of a conflict, as is often the case. And we are encouraged that a growing number of reports to the Security Council, as well as mission mandate renewal resolutions, address issues related to women in conflict and post-conflict situations. However, as the Secretary-General noted, "mere reference to women, peace and security resolutions is not enough." We must give UN entities strong support to implement and deliver results for gender equality.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    In the Participation Pillar, the U.S. supported Afghan women's inclusion in the High Peace Council and in follow-on shuras and negotiations, in the reintegration and reconciliation process at the local level. We've also awarded $16.9 million in direct grants to Afghan women-focused NGOs. In the Protection Pillar, the U.S. contributed roughly $2 million to the office of the Special Representative of the Secretary General for sexual violence and conflict. We have provided numerous courses to foreign militaries on human rights, prevention of gender-based violence, sexual exploitation, and protection of civilians.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    In the Prevention Pillar, the U.S. has developed multiple programs that seek to address the root causes of conflict, including a $26 million annual Reconciliation Program that supports innovative programming in conflict-affected countries and includes gender analysis. In the Relief and Recovery Pillar, the U.S. has provided significant funding to improve water and sanitation in situations in which women's safety and security are at risk.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    As the President's concept note (S/2011/654) rightly points out, many gaps and challenges remain on the road to translating words into action and ensuring the full participation of women in all stages of conflict prevention, conflict resolution and peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    The PRST to be adopted today clearly recognizes once again the significant role of women in prevention, conflict resolution and post conflict rebuilding. Including women in peace initiatives is not a benevolent act, we see it as a key requirement to any lasting, sustainable peace. Women's participation will strengthen the capacity to resolve conflict and build security and justice systems that protect the human rights of all. However, we have still existing gaps between repeated commitments and the situation on the ground. Women remain severely under-represented in peace negotiations and they are often marginalized in efforts to build sustainable peace.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    And not just the inclusion of women negotiators, but more broadly a gender perspective, so that gender is established as a thread running through all major peace-building issues, rather than being parked on its own as a discrete topic. Gender is not a box to be ticked, a nod to political correctness. Its place is not at the end of a long list – it is a concern which should condition the approach from start to finish. The promise and potential of women peace-builders was evident to a delegation of women Ambassadors, including Ireland's Ambassador to the African Union, that paid a visit to Sudan earlier this year and met with a cross-section of women peace-builders, legislators and IDPs. The delegation's report noted the determination of women to play a full role in conflict prevention efforts and recommended that international organisations take on more responsibility for implementing women, peace and security priorities.
  • Country

    Kyrgyzstan
  • Extracts

    Following the inter-ethnic conflict in southern Kyrgyzstan in 2010, special importance was given to supporting female initiatives in the area of conflict resolution, peacebuilding and post-conflict reconstruction. In that difficult time, women activists joined together to form women's peacekeeping networks in order to put an end to conflict and violence and to prevent a recurrence of the tragic events.

    My country notes the timely and swift reaction of the United Nations Peacebuilding Fund, which funded projects to promote national reconciliation and post- conflict reconstruction. Today, the women's peacekeeping network includes 20 local women's peace committees and serves as the link between local communities and the central Government.
    Kyrgyzstan believes that the key role in coordinating agreed measures on women's participation in conflict prevention and peacebuilding efforts should be played by the new entity UN-Women. Through close partnerships with UN-Women, UNICEF, the United Nations Development Programme and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, in May the network of Kyrgyzstan women peacekeepers began to implement 11 projects aimed at fostering inter-ethnic harmony and ensuring peace in post-conflict areas of Kyrgyzstan. We also consider it necessary to more actively promote that component in the action strategy of the United Nations Regional Centre for Preventive Diplomacy for Central Asia.
  • Country

    Kyrgyzstan
  • Extracts

    Preventive actions in post-conflict countries, including comprehensive reform of judicial and law enforcement systems, are important as the only way to ensure the rule of law and better protection of the rights of women, particularly in protecting them from violence and increasing their participation in the law enforcement sector. My country believes that positive experience in that area must be mainstreamed and disseminated.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    We commend you, Madam President, on your concept note (S/2011/654, annex) focusing on the role of women in conflict prevention and mediation.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    Luxembourg continues to place great importance on the plight of women in crisis situations and on mainstreaming the gender dimension into the work of international and regional organizations in that respect. Last December, Luxembourg decided to fund a major project of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations that is aimed at strengthening women's leadership and participation in political life and in peacebuilding activities in countries emerging from conflict. With our support, concrete results are being achieved in three countries — Timor-Leste, Haiti and the Democratic Republic of the Congo — through partnerships forged between national and local authorities and United Nations missions and agencies. We are determined to maintain and to reinforce that national commitment. By strengthening the role of women in conflict prevention and mediation, we will help to improve society as a whole.

  • Country

    Solomon Is.
  • Extracts

    My delegation is mindful of the deep gaps within resolution 1325 (2000), as it deals merely with peace and security, not development. Our reading of the resolution is that it engages women becoming agents of change in conflict prevention, management and peacebuilding, acting as fire-fighters putting out fires without looking at the causes of conflict. Peace and security, however, can be sustained by having a sustainable development context to them.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    We must expand the role of women everywhere. We need women to play a greater role in preventive diplomacy, mediation and peacekeeping. We need women to play a greater role in post-conflict reconstruction and institution-building, and we need a greater role for women in sustainable development and as agents for social transformation. The integral link between peace, security, gender equality and development is evident. This interaction renders women's participation in peace processes and sustainable development mutually reinforcing. The issue of women's security should therefore be addressed through holistic methodologies rather than ad hoc solutions. In that regard, while we should put gender equality and the empowerment of women at the core of our efforts, we should further encourage and support their participation in the work of peace, including post-conflict recovery efforts and the sustainable development process.

  • Country

    Burundi
  • Extracts

    In the area of prevention and protection, the Government of Burundi has taken stern measures to discourage abuse of girls as wives or sex slaves, by instituting a police unit for minors and morality under the ministry that handles public security. As part of the fight against gender-based violence, training sessions are regularly conducted for the military and the national police forces. On top of everything else, a national strategy to fight gender-based violence has been drawn up and will soon be adopted by the Government. The implementation of that strategy will, however, require strong support from the international community.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    First, to avoid and reduce the harm suffered by women in armed conflict, it is first necessary to prevent war and reduce conflicts. The Security Council bears the primary responsibility of maintaining international peace and security. To safeguard women's rights and interests, the Council should conduct active preventive diplomacy and promote the use of means such as dialogue, consultations and negotiations for the peaceful settlement of disputes. Council resolutions, especially its mandate for civilian protection, should be strictly implemented so as to avoid more casualties among women and children.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Secondly, ensuring the participation of women in conflict resolution and prevention and in rehabilitation and reconstruction is an important part of the efforts to implement resolution 1325 (2000). China supports a bigger role for women in good offices and dispute mediation. We hope the Secretary-General will appoint more female special representatives and special envoys, and we hope to see greater participation by women in United Nations good offices and mediation concerning major international and regional hotspots.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    For a start, I would like to emphasize that women's security is part of overall peace and security and that women can contribute to peace processes and are very able to do so. The involvement of women in peacekeeping operations and conflict prevention is of the utmost importance to ensure the success of the operations, as it is the only way to reach the whole population.

  • Country

    Senegal
  • Extracts

    The effective prevention of sexual violence also requires stringent measures to vigorously combat the root causes of conflict exacerbation. Since there is an established link between what is known as low-level conflicts and wide-scale violence against women, I would like to launch an appeal for coordinated and focused action against the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons. In that regard, my delegation cherishes the hope that the diplomatic conference of 2012 will enable the adoption of a robust arms trade treaty. Allow me to conclude by expressing my country's conviction that the efforts to be undertaken by 2015 will enable the Security Council to take stock at that time of the positive implementation of resolution 1325 (2000).
  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    we encourage the Security Council to continue to provide the political leadership and take targeted actions to ensure the meaningful participation of women in conflict prevention, mediation and resolution processes.

    In order to inform the work of the Council, we recommend that the Council receive regular briefings on these matters by the Secretary-General and other relevant officials including the Special Representative of the Secretary General for Sexual Violence in Armed Conflict.
  • Country

    Israel
  • Extracts

    In a region where women are too often excluded from public life, Israeli women stand out as leaders in law, politics, mediation and conflict prevention and resolution.

  • Country

    Israel
  • Extracts

    As part of our commitment to implementing resolution 1325 (2000), Israel's Government holds workshops to promote dialogue between Israeli and Palestinian women at the Mount Carmel International Training Center in Haifa. More than 650 Israeli and Palestinian women have participated in more than 20 workshops over the past eight years. Such seminars provide women with the tools and understanding needed to promote peace and non-violence. A wide range of similar projects are now under way in Israel.

Disarmament
  • Country

    Sudan
  • Extracts

    Our national programmes on resettlement, disarmament, demobilization and reintegration have given priority to the situation of women, in close coordination with the relevant United Nations agencies, including the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM). In that respect, we commend the relationship of cooperation with UNIFEM in connection with women's issues and its role in the implementation of the aforementioned plan of action. We hope that the Fund, through the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-Women), will take on a more important and active role in enhancing national capacities and efforts aimed at advancing the situation of women in the country.

  • Country

    S. Korea
  • Extracts

    Thirdly, we need to pay greater attention to the vulnerability of displaced women and girls, given their particular risk of sexual and gender-based violence. My delegation welcomes the target set out in the strategic results framework on the special measures to increase the security of female refugees and persons internally displaced by armed conflict, as well as to ensure multi-sectoral prevention and response mechanisms for sexual and gender-based violence in camp and non-camp settings alike.

  • Country

    Senegal
  • Extracts

    The effective prevention of sexual violence also requires stringent measures to vigorously combat the root causes of conflict exacerbation. Since there is an established link between what is known as low-level conflicts and wide-scale violence against women, I would like to launch an appeal for coordinated and focused action against the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons. In that regard, my delegation cherishes the hope that the diplomatic conference of 2012 will enable the adoption of a robust arms trade treaty. Allow me to conclude by expressing my country's conviction that the efforts to be undertaken by 2015 will enable the Security Council to take stock at that time of the positive implementation of resolution 1325 (2000).
  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    Our plan is the result of a participatory and comprehensive exercise led by the Ministry for Foreign Affairs, and involves other State and civil society agencies. In addition to incorporating the traditional contributions of the Ministries of Security and Defence, the plan includes input from stakeholders with experience in training and assistance to women victims of gender violence and human trafficking, who we believe are able to contribute to the reconstruction of societies affected by armed conflict, thereby underscoring the gender approach in the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration process and preventing the re-victimization of women. Moreover, we believe it necessary to include cooperation in the field of health, in particular sexual and reproductive health, and in the integration of women into the labour market and the educational system.

  • Country

    Maldives
  • Extracts

    Maldives has expressed support for Libya's National Transitional Council. With its current transition from conflict to creating a stable Government, we urge the National Transitional Council to stay mindful of the specific needs of women and its obligations towards them. That includes everything from disarmament and reconciliation to women's participation and representation. The path towards democracy is never easy, and women are often the first to be forgotten.

Participation
  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    We also recognize the importance of the concept note (S/2011/654, annex) prepared by the delegation of Nigeria, where proper emphasis is placed on the participation and role of women in conflict prevention and mediation.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    We agree with the Secretary-General that UN-Women constitutes the cornerstone for articulating the mandates of the United Nations system in promoting gender equality and the empowerment of women. In this context, we emphasize the role that broad and inclusive intergovernmental consultations have in evaluating the gender architecture and the advancement of women, as well as the agreements between States on models and practices adopted in that area. All of that is an essential element for progress in improving national capacity to generate greater participation of women in conflict prevention and mediation.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    I would like to highlight the fact that the report of the Secretary-General notes progress made in Colombia in connection with the four aspects of resolution 1325 (2000), namely, prevention, participation, protection and relief and recovery. I think that it is also important to highlight other important actions that are being pursued in these areas in my country on the basis of our conviction that the phenomenon of violence against women includes domestic violence, violence committed in the context of the community and violence caused by illegal armed groups.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    With regard to participation, I should also like to mention initiatives such as the creation of women's community councils, indigenous women's regional laboratories and community radio programming boards. These are tools designed to promote the involvement of women in public policies, support leaders to advance the implementation of such policies, sustain a dialogue with this sector and with women's social organizations, and promote participatory processes at regional, departmental and municipal levels.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    There has been legislation in place in this area since 1992, recently updated by a law in 2011 that provides for and promotes the participation of women in the exercise of legislative policy work in the Congress, as well as in the executive and judicial branches. There are now 37 women in the Colombian parliament. The highest positions in the country's public prosecutors' and comptrollers' offices are held by women. In the Ministry for Foreign Affairs, the Minister and two deputy ministers are women, from whom I receive orders — I mean, instructions — every day.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    All of that reflects the efforts being made by the Government of Colombia to adopt policies designed to include women at all stages of peacekeeping and peacebuilding while eliminating discrimination against women and promoting their economic, political and social empowerment, as well as their more active participation in development, both in decisionmaking and in enjoying the benefits that development brings.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    The commemoration of the tenth anniversary of resolution 1325 (2000) last year resulted in a number of renewed commitments and achievements on the part of Member States in implementing that resolution and others on women and peace and security. This year has also seen numerous actions within the United Nations and by Member States in joint efforts to implement the resolution and advance women's participation in peace and security, with particular emphasis on preventive diplomacy, mediation efforts, conflict prevention and peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Ensuring that women are represented and participate in decision-making forums, institutions and mechanisms concerned with preventing and resolving conflict and with peacebuilding; that they are included in peace agreement negotiations and implementation; and that enabling conditions for women peacemakers and peacekeepers are created requires clear guidelines and support on the part of the United Nations and national authorities. Member States and regional and sub-regional organizations should invest more in strengthening the capacity of women's organizations. Such organizations should be provided with support for their conflict-prevention and resolution efforts and consulted more on local women's peace initiatives.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    We firmly believe that women should be involved in the policymaking and post-conflict planning and programming processes. It is also important to increase the number of gender experts on the roster. Furthermore, the various implementation gaps should be addressed more systematically, including through improved coordination and accountability for results. Clarity, comparability and consistency are necessary in order to monitor the impact of various efforts on women's empowerment and their rights.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Finally, Bosnia and Herzegovina firmly believes that there can be no lasting peace and security without the full participation of women in every aspect and at every stage of peacekeeping and peacebuilding, as well as in conflict-prevention activities. We therefore remain committed to expanding our support for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), other relevant resolutions, and future efforts of the Security Council on this issue.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The five-year plans formulated by the Government of India for economic development recognize the important role of women as agents of sustained socio-economic growth and change by incorporating proposals on gender empowerment. Women's empowerment is essential to promote overall sustainable development. That is also true in conflict situations. We believe that the participation of women in all stages of the peace process — conflict prevention, peace negotiations, peacekeeping and post-conflict reconstruction — is essential for lasting peace and security.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The United Nations is being asked to do more with regard to women and peace and security, including through the mainstreaming of the gender perspective in the United Nations system and United Nations peacekeeping missions. We commend the work of the Secretary-General in mainstreaming the gender perspective in the United Nations recruitment process. The number of women at the senior decision-making level and the participation of women in mission planning, peacekeeping operations and peacebuilding efforts have increased. Nonetheless, the numbers still remain very low.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    The adoption of resolution 1325 (2000) was hailed as a landmark and groundbreaking resolution. For the first time, the importance of women's full participation in conflict prevention, conflict resolution and peacebuilding at all levels was recognized. Since then, the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and its sister resolutions have paved the way for the mainstreaming of the gender perspective in United Nations peacekeeping operations and missions worldwide. In a similar vein, the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, which also addresses women and armed conflict, should continue to be implemented. Those various international frameworks on women are complementary and mutually reinforce our efforts to protect the rights of women in conflict situations.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    Our annual debate on women and peace and security is built upon various premises, among them, first, that women in conflict are often victims and shoulder multiple consequences of conflict, and secondly, that despite being vulnerable, in many instances women in conflict have continued to demonstrate their transformative role and their potential for creating sustainable peace. Indonesia shares the common view that through the promotion of women's role as agents of peace, their plight as victims of conflict can be overcome. Embedded in that common view is the paramount importance of conflict prevention.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    In this context, our efforts in waging peace should nurture an environment that accommodates the contribution of women to conflict prevention. That would mean, among other things, enhancing women's participation in decision-making processes, building a culture of peace that respects life, and promoting a way of life that values non-violence and dialogue and is characterized by cooperation and social responsibility.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    In a peaceful atmosphere, women can fulfil their role as transmitters of values, as economic resource managers and as solidarity supporters and networkers. If they have the space to build networks, women can encourage social and political groups to take preventive measures before conflicts break out. Given their unique perspectives and insights on women in conflict, the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) would benefit by the presence of more women in formal institutions of conflict prevention and resolution, including in preventive diplomacy and mediation efforts.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    Women's potential as agents of change, skilfully reshaping and rebuilding communities affected by conflict, is an important resource to tap into. However, it is not always the case that they can be readily available for such a huge task. In post-conflict situations, the deficit in experience, skills, understanding and knowledge on women and peace issues is often a hindrance to enlisting a greater involvement of women. Overcoming the trauma they have had to endure can also be a factor working against women becoming active peacebuilding actors.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    To conclude, let me reiterate that the responsibility to implement relevant Security Council resolutions on enhancing women's participation in peace processes, including the protection of women, rests primarily with individual Governments. Through this debate, we can once again reaffirm our readiness to promote the participation of women in peace processes, including within the framework of Security Council resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    We are committed to gender equality and the empowerment of women. We are currently in the process of drafting a national action plan on resolution 1325 (2000). Efforts are already under way to promote that resolution and to raise awareness of gender-based violence, human rights and peacebuilding through the training of women's groups, survivors of violence, men and youth. Community mediators, 50 per cent of whom are women, have been trained to assist in situations involving local conflict. Involving women at the outset has had an exponentially beneficial effect in Timor- Leste and has laid the foundation for women's participation and inclusion, not only in Government, but also across all sectors. We are proud to note that women's representation in our Parliament is at 29 per cent, and we have set a goal to reach 35 per cent representation by 2015. The recently adopted electoral law requires that every third candidate on party lists be a woman, thereby ensuring that this target will be reached.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    It is not possible to create a legitimate and durable post-conflict political system that does not include the full and equal participation of women in decision-making. The role of women in economic development must be recognized in order to grow a post-conflict economy. Women, after all, are most likely to be providing direct support to children and extended kinship networks. Bringing the voice of women to the forefront of conflict prevention and mediation work will therefore help build more resilient communities and a more sustainable peace. That is key to the Security Council's work.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    For example, FemLINKPacific leads a community and media policy network on women, peace and security in Fiji, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Bougainville in Papua New Guinea. Through the production of a wide range of media initiatives, they are empowering women across the Pacific to engage with decision makers at all levels on issues that affect them.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    Peace negotiations not only shape the post-conflict political landscape directly, through agreements on justice, power-sharing and constitutional issues, but also indirectly, by lending legitimacy to those represented at the peace table. A properly integrated role for women enhances the prospects of a durable and lasting peace.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Indeed, inroads have been made in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), as highlighted in the Secretary-General's report (S/2011/598*). However, let us be clear that gaps remain in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), as well as glaring disparities pertaining to the role of women in preventive diplomacy, formal peace processes and mediation. We therefore welcome the institutional and policy frameworks elaborated in the Secretary-General's report, in particular his seven point action plan for gender-responsive peacebuilding, which seeks to establish standard operating procedures for gender issues in the United Nations, conflict resolution and peacebuilding architecture.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    We further welcome the practical recommendations and the strategic results framework outlined in the Secretary-General's report, which constitute a concrete proposal to include women in conflict prevention and mediation. In particular, we wish to highlight the importance of nominating women to lead negotiation processes and increasing the number of women in the foreign services and security establishments.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Equally, the proposal to increase the number of women police and troops in United Nations missions is highly desirable in addressing the specific needs of women in conflict and postconflict countries.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    In that regard, South Africa is among the States with the highest representation of women across all spheres of Government. Women are also at the helm of ministries in the fields of international relations, cooperation and defence. In the area of peacekeeping, we have deployed gender mainstreaming officers in positions of command in peacekeeping missions to ensure that issues related to women are addressed. In addition, we are one of the top three troop-contributing countries with the largest contingent of women in peacekeeping missions.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    In the recent past, South African women held the position of Deputy Police commissioner in the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur. We believe that the presence of women in peacekeeping missions positively benefits local women and girls, including other vulnerable groups in countries in, and emerging from, conflict.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Indeed, in congratulating the three outstanding women who were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize this year, President Johnson-Sirleaf of Liberia, her compatriot Ms. Leymah Gbowee and Ms. Tawakkul Karman of Yemen, President Jacob Zuma underscored the important contribution that women continue to play in their ongoing struggle for women's rights, dignity, peace and development all over the world. The vast majority of women are not involved in creating wars, but they remain the primary victims of war and conflict. Long after the guns have ceased blazing, their children and families continue to suffer the devastating effects of the aftermath of conflict. Women are the ones left to pick up the pieces and to rebuild families and their communities.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Women also suffer disproportionately from poverty. An important dimension in advancing peace and preventing conflict is to ensure greater and more equitable economic justice and development. Despite advances in positioning women to assume leadership roles in conflict prevention and mediation, those advances will be meaningless if the root causes of conflict, which are by and large developmental in nature, are not sufficiently addressed.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    Exactly a week ago, the Security Council resolution on Yemen (resolution 2014 (2011)) called upon all concerned parties to improve women's participation in conflict resolution and encouraged them to facilitate the equal and full participation of women at decision making levels. Yesterday's resolution on Libya (resolution 2016 (2011)) emphasized the importance of the full and equal participation of women and the respect for the human rights of all. We welcome these very strong calls.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    During this eventful year, women have taken to the streets and squares across North Africa and the Middle East and demanded change, equality, freedom and justice alongside men. We call on the Security Council to ensure that women's voices are heard and reflected in planning, actions and results. Provisions on women's full participation and on the protection and promotion of women's human rights should be included in all relevant country-specific resolutions, and they should be systematically followed up when the special envoys and Special Representatives of the Secretary-General report back to the Council.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    The conflict-prevention and mitigation efforts of women through civil society and governmental channels deserve our increased financial, political and technical support. Civil society participation serves a double aim: it fosters inclusive dialogue and development. It also builds the capacity of women to engage in more formal processes. Increasing the number of women in Government structures, for example in the security and justice sectors, makes such institutions more democratic, gender-responsive and accountable. This contributes to conflict prevention.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    Women must be fully involved from the very beginning of peace processes so as to enhance the quality and sustainability of peace agreements. Mediation and negotiation teams should have specialized gender expertise and carry out inclusive consultations. Further efforts are urgently needed to nominate and appoint more women mediators and to address the obstacles women face. Increasing the number of women in international organizations and in national diplomatic services is one tool for enlarging the pool of qualified women. At the same time, guidance and expertise is needed for mediators to integrate a gender perspective in ceasefire and in peace agreements. The Nordic countries welcome the work of UNWomen and fully support its joint strategy with the Department of Political Affairs on gender and mediation as an effective tool.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    Secondly, we are pleased to report a clear increase in the number of women among the military, police and civilian peacekeepers deployed. We also committed to train our personnel on gender equality and human rights. The mixed police teams deployed in Haiti, Liberia and Afghanistan have all received training on resolution 1325 (2000). Some have been specifically trained to address sexual and gender-based violence. We have developed a human rights manual for all crisis management personnel and supported gender-sensitive security sector reform in Palestine and the Balkans.

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    As members know, two years ago Gabon underwent a political transition that was outstandingly led by two women, one the President of the Senate and the other the President of the Constitutional Court. When Ali Bongo Ondimba, President of the Gabonese Republic, addressed the sixty-sixth session of the General Assembly, he recalled the high priority Gabon gives to the effective participation of women in mediation and conflict prevention (see A/66/PV.16). A few weeks ago, we welcomed the awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize to three women: Mrs. Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, President of Liberia, Ms. Leymah Gbowee, Liberian activist, and Ms. Tawakkul Karman, Yemeni activist. This year, those three women clearly embody the very issue we are discussing.

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    The Security Council reached a consensus more than a decade ago in recognizing, through the adoption on 31 October 2000 of resolution 1325 (2000), the decisive role of women in the prevention and resolution of conflicts and in peacebuilding. In its presidential statement S/PRST/2001/31, the Council made commitments on this issue. In doing so, it established that without the effective participation of women in peace processes, our efforts to maintain international peace and security would always be incomplete and would yield diminished results.

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    We welcome the fact that a majority of Security Council resolutions focus particular attention on the question of women's effective participation. That fortunate trend should be pursued so that it becomes an essential part of the work of the Council and of the United Nations.

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    An important aspect of our debate is the link between preventive diplomacy and the Council's initiatives to promote the role of women in peace processes. More than 10 years of continued efforts to implement resolution 1325 (2000) have revealed the limits of a reactive approach. Gabon supports a more comprehensive approach aimed at incorporating conflict prevention as a fundamental part of an effective strategy to protect women and young girls from the agony of conflict and war. Through such a strategy, women would have leading roles, which of course entails women playing a part in the policy sphere in peacetime so that they can be fully involved in the different stages of mediation and political negotiation in times of crisis. In this regard, regional and sub-regional organizations, namely African organizations, should also adopt such a strategy. The African Union's incorporation of gender parity in the highest positions of its hierarchy is a strong indication of a move in that direction.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    If we want to see tangible progress in this area, more needs to be done at the national, regional, and international levels. First, women and women's rights must be consistently included in peace talks. Women are formidable negotiators, mediators and peace-builders. But all too often they are denied access to negotiations at the highest level because of the lack of political will or commitment. A transparent and inclusive peace process involving representatives of every component of society, including women, is the most likely to succeed.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    Third, it is not enough to simply advocate the participation of women in peace processes. We need to provide concrete support for women to build the skills needed for meaningful involvement. And education is crucial. At the same time, social barriers blocking women's access to peace processes need to be addressed. Since men are also a part of the equation, civic education and human rights programmes for both men and women at the community level can help lift these barriers and hammer home the importance of gender inclusiveness. We must also support civil society organizations, in particular women's groups, which are vital to creating better links among women and between state and community.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    In December 2010 Italy adopted a three-year action plan on Resolution 1325. The plan provides a strategic framework to improve implementation of 1325 by having a national focal point at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs monitor all relevant activities. The plan focuses on key goals such as: increasing the number of women in the national Police and in the armed Forces; strengthening the inclusion of women in peace operations and in the decision-making bodies of peace operations; protecting the human rights of women and children, in conflict and post-conflict; strengthening women's participation in peace processes; and engaging with civil society organizations to promote the implementation of Resolution 1325.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    Eleven years after the adoption of Resolution 1325, we are all called to renew our commitment to ensure women may assert their right to determine the peaceful futures of their communities. Let's not miss this opportunity.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    The main action lines of that document are to apply a gender focus to the respect and promotion of human rights; to promote the equal participation of women both in peacekeeping operations and in related decision-making bodies; to bring a gender perspective in the broadest sense of the term to bear on the design, implementation and execution of our international cooperation policies; to strengthen the technical capacity of both public officials and civil society with regard to gender issues and security and conflict; and to promote the regional implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) through the exchange of experience and international cooperation, both bilaterally and via the regional peacekeeping operations in which Chile takes part, particularly in the context of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    The adoption by the Security Council of resolution 1325 (2000) bears testimony to the progress made during the past decade in the area of women and peace and security. That landmark resolution has brought much-needed attention to the question of women's empowerment, which represents a priority for my country. While all the resolutions on women and peace and security are equally important, resolution 1325 (2000) serves as an umbrella resolution in addressing women's empowerment, their task as peacebuilders and their fragile position as victims of war.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    We call upon the Security Council to intensify its efforts in the fight against impunity and to provide strong and effective leadership in strengthening the rule of law, with the ultimate aim of eradicating this abhorrent behaviour. The Council should include sexual violence as a priority element in resolutions mandating its sanctions committees, and they should explicitly include sexual violence as a criterion for the designation of political and military leaders for targeted measures. Perpetrators of sexual violence, including commanders who commission or condone the use of sexual violence, should be held accountable. Furthermore, we encourage strengthening the coordination among United Nations agencies both at Headquarters and in the field, especially in monitoring and reporting on situations where parties to armed conflict engage in rape and other sexual violence as means of war.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    Those opportunities, however, can be enhanced significantly depending on how the international community sets its priorities for recovery and uses its strategies for peacebuilding. Those priorities should consist of specific national and international policies aimed at increasing women's participation in conflict prevention and resolution, mediation, peace negotiations and peacebuilding. The integrationof the resolution has to be country-driven, and Member States need to take responsibility for its success by ensuring that it is integrated into national policies. We urge countries to apply a broad gendermainstreaming approach across Government, for instance through a system-wide approach that links development, humanitarian and defence issues. All plans should include civil society consultations, as well as monitoring and reporting mechanisms.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    Croatia's policy in this regard is directed towards the substantial deployment of women in peacekeeping operations, in both the armed forces and police, as their presence reinforces the importance of women's perspective and represents added value for all initiatives aimed at achieving peace.

  • Speaker

    The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)
  • Extracts

    The Security Council's consideration of the subject of women, peace and security 11 years ago, which resulted in the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), was a landmark event in the recognition of importance of women's equal participation and full involvement in the maintenance of peace and security, including in conflict management, peacekeeping and post-conflict peacebuilding. The engagement of the Security Council on this issue built on the work done by the Economic and Social Council on gender equality and women's empowerment. I wish to believe that the Economic and Social Council was catalytic in that regard by virtue of its historic adoption of agreed conclusions on gender mainstreaming at its substantive session in 1997 and of the annual follow-up that it has carried out on the matter since then.

  • Speaker

    The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)
  • Extracts

    Those of us from the continent, which has suffered so many conflicts, know and understand the terrible impact of war. We also know that women and girls suffer disproportionately — indirectly and directly — as victims of violent conflict. We also know that unless women are key players in rebuilding their societies, including by playing key roles in negotiating peace agreements, national reconciliation and in re-launching economic recovery, such efforts will not succeed. We also know that gender equality and the empowerment of women are crosscutting issues for all development policies and, indeed, should be a cornerstone for all policies, including for peacemaking and peacebuilding.

  • Speaker

    The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)
  • Extracts

    The Economic and Social Council devoted its 2010 annual ministerial review last year to the internationally agreed development goals and commitments in regard to gender equality and the empowerment of women. The ministerial declaration adopted by the Council broke new ground in that, for the first time, an intergovernmental body highlighted a number of crosscutting issues where action was expected to positively enhance gender-related goals. These cross-cutting issues are also relevant with regard to the role of women in contributing to peacemaking and peacebuilding. I wish briefly to highlight some of these crosscutting issues, which are of particular relevance to this debate and call for a common approach by the United Nations system at the normative, programmatic and operational levels.

  • Speaker

    The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)
  • Extracts

    Fifthly, promoting the full integration of women into the formal economy is also particularly relevant in post-conflict recovery and peacebuilding contexts, where new opportunities should be offered to women as part of the dividends of peace and as a way to consolidate social peace. The development and security pillars of the Organization are strongly interconnected in this respect. Sixthly, ensuring that women and girls with disabilities are not subject to multiple and aggravated forms of discrimination. Women with war-related disabilities deserve particular attention and support. The coordinated involvement of humanitarian, development, health and protection actors should be promoted by our intergovernmental bodies in order to target this category of women and girls.

  • Speaker

    The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)
  • Extracts

    The members of the Economic and Social Council also commit to providing the requisite guidance to the agencies, funds and programmes on implementing the actions required to implement resolution 1325 (2000), particularly those linked to the coordination of humanitarian action, the transition from relief to development and the promotion of the active role and participation of women in sustainable development

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    Although Ms. Bachelet aptly highlighted the modest progress made by Member States and the United Nations in advancing the agenda of resolution 1325 (2000), we must heed her warning that we are very far from sufficiently and systematically integrating women into the process of conflict prevention and peacebuilding. We believe that this is an auspicious moment in the history of the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). The draft presidential statement that is to be adopted today could not have come at a better time, coming as it does in the aftermath of the recognition by the Nobel Committee of the role and participation of the three eminent women in conflict resolution and peace processes in their respective communities. While congratulating President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, Ms. Leymah Gbowee and Ms. Tawakkul Karman for their groundbreaking achievement, we share the hope of the Nobel Committee that this recognition of the important place of women in the peace process, which the draft presidential statement echoes loudly, is a watershed moment and paradigm shift in the global effort to implement resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    We note with satisfaction that the draft presidential statement accords with the theme of this open debate, namely, “The role and participation of women in conflict prevention and mediation”. Through the draft presidential statement, the Council recognizes that women can, and do, play crucial roles in the prevention of conflict. Nevertheless, it also notes that more needs to be done to create the enabling conditions for the participation of women in all stages of the peace process.

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    Such efforts at creating the right conditions for ensuring women's full participation should include increasing the participation and representation of women in preventive diplomacy initiatives. It should also include strengthening the capacities of the relevant Government institutions and women's organizations involved with conflict and post-conflict issues, the adequate representation of women in the negotiation and implementation of peace agreements, support for local women's peace initiatives, the promotion and protection of the human rights of women, higher levels of representation in decision-making roles, and ensuring proper coherence and coordination among the United Nations entities responsible for implementing the women, peace and security agenda in the entire United Nations system.

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    Nigeria is also committed to fulfilling its obligations under the African Charter of Human and Peoples' Rights on the rights of women in Africa. As Ms. Bachelet has often said, the obstacles to women's political participation, which I believe have a direct bearing on their capacity to play an active role in preventive diplomacy and conflict prevention, are indeed enormous. Violence, poverty, lack of access to education and health care, and limited economic opportunities all combine to undermine the role of women and girls in conflict prevention, peace negotiations and peacebuilding. It is therefore necessary that we develop and take measures to address these inherent obstacles. Promoting women's equality and empowerment is, in our view, one of the best ways to address the root causes of conflict and therefore prevent such conflict. I envisage a presidential statement along those lines in the near future.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    Resolution 1325 (2000), adopted 11 years ago, represents a fundamental milestone, because ever since its adoption the issue of the role of women in peace and security has occupied an important place on the agenda of the Security Council. As a result, it has taken on an important and essential role in the achievement of international peace and security. The resolution has served as the point of departure for subsequent developments on this issue in the Security Council when it comes to ensuring the participation of women in peacekeeping and peacebuilding and, most especially, with regard to combating sexual violence against women and girls. For that reason, along with international human rights law and international humanitarian law, resolution 1325 (2000) and resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010) provide the international community with a normative framework for considering the needs of women in conflict and post-conflict situations.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    As we all clearly acknowledge today, women are decisive actors in every stage of long-term peacebuilding processes, which is why we concur with the Secretary-General on the need to encourage women's participation as an integral part of efforts to establish, maintain and build peace.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    Women are decisive actors in the three pillars of achieving lasting peace, namely, economic recovery, social cohesion and political legitimacy. In that respect, it is essential that emphasis be placed in all post conflict phases on strengthening the rule of law as well as the economic and political empowerment of women in order to guarantee their full insertion in the community.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    Peru believes that the high-level review of the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) proposed for 2015 will be an opportunity to comprehensively review the progress made by the United Nations system and by Member States in the priority areas of prevention, participation, protection, relief and recovery, as well as on the recommendations put forward by the Secretary-General or by a working group established to implement the resolution.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    We have moved forward in recognizing the importance of women's participation in peace and security. However, we still face many challenges. What is most important is to join forces so that women and girls are able to exercise their right to live without fear, without violence and with respect and equality of opportunity.

  • Country

    Sudan
  • Extracts

    My country has applied the principle of equal pay for equal work since 1967. Legislation and laws concerning women have been developed, especially in 2003, when a law was passed equalizing the age of retirement for men and women. With respect to the promotion of the rights of Sudanese women in the area of political participation, there has been a qualitative development in the form of the electoral law of 2008, which increased the percentage of participation by women to 25 per cent in the federal and State Parliaments and was fully implemented during the elections held in the country last year. Thus women constitute one quarter of the membership of the Sudanese Parliament, while the report before the Council (S/2011/598*) states in paragraph 23 that women make up 19 per cent of parliamentarians globally.

    Regarding the level of participation of Sudanese women in the civil service, which has reached 66 per cent, I wish to note by way of example that in the judiciary alone, there are 79 women judges. Many such judges eventually become Supreme Court judges. Sudanese women have held high diplomatic posts, and many of them serve as ambassadors to various countries. A large number of women are doctors and specialize in various fields of medicine. In addition, they have assumed leading posts in the armed forces, the police and the security forces.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    My country is convinced that peace, development and democracy cannot be carried out without the full participation of women in public life and in the decision-making process.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    Tunisia intends to continue implementing that resolution as apart of its comprehensive approach to gender equality and the empowerment of women, and will make itself available to the United Nations concerning any aspect of implementing resolution 1325 (2000) and other international instruments dealing with the welfare of women and their participation in decision-making processes, as well as promoting a culture of respect for women.

  • Country

    Bangladesh
  • Extracts

    We recognize that empowering women will lead to their taking command of resources and acquiring adequate leadership capabilities for the efficient management of those resources. Therefore, we emphasize the fulfilment of women's economic needs and the necessity of their engagement internationally at all levels and in all forms of decision-making.

    While the former could be achieved by ensuring women's access to and participation in income- generating and entrepreneurial activities, such as micro-credit, education, vocational training and public health, the latter could be ensured through the recruitment of women, particularly to senior positions. In order to more clearly understand the needs of the women of the South, we must ensure that women from the global South get due recognition in the consideration of such recruitment. For proper coordination with the field, the fair representation of troop- and police-contributing countries must be ensured, as decided previously by the General Assembly and the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations of the United Nations. We believe that women's participation can be ensured through an inclusive process. At the policy level, this requires the creation of a mechanism to integrate women into decision-making processes, which should be supported by the necessary capacity- building initiatives at the community level that would enable women to effectively participate. We strongly believe that our debates and discussions, instead of being confined to our respective capitals, should transcend borders and reach women at the grass-roots level, women who may sometimes be unable even to find the words to express their agony. This has to be done by empowering the people, especially women, at the grass-roots level. If we fail to do so, our progress will be slow.
  • Country

    Bangladesh
  • Extracts

    In Bangladesh, through our experience of nation- building and women's empowerment, we have embraced that view and developed what our Prime Minister, Her Excellency Sheikh Hasina, calls a peace model. The central message of the model is to empower people, including women and vulnerable groups, by providing them with an education and helping them to build their skills, by ensuring that they exercise their right to vote and participate in governance, by raising their income level, by ending poverty and hunger and by eliminating all forms of discrimination and terrorism. In her address to the General Assembly (see A/66/PV.22), the Prime Minister of Bangladesh presented her model to the world community, as she is convinced that if peace is attained, development and prosperity will follow. We would be happy to share our experiences with interested delegates.

  • Country

    Bangladesh
  • Extracts

    In Bangladesh, women occupy the top political leadership posts in the country. The Constitution of Bangladesh guarantees the equality of men and women within the broad framework of non-discrimination on the grounds of religion, race or gender. The Government has adopted a national policy for women's advancement and a national plan of action. A women's development implementation committee, headed by the Minister for Women's and Children's Affairs, monitors the implementation of policies for women's empowerment. It has also introduced gender-based budgeting. The results have been highly positive. To cite just one example, the enrolment of girls in both primary and secondary level schools exceeds that of boys, helped by tuition waivers and the provision of stipends for girls in secondary schools.

  • Country

    Kenya
  • Extracts

    My delegation believes that women's participation enhances social harmony and inclusivity and reduces the chances of conflict. Women, therefore, should participate as full partners in governance institutions. The new Kenya Constitution has entrenched women's participation in all aspects of Kenya's governance structures and social life in general. Furthermore, the national policy on gender and development has set up an ambitious agenda aimed at integrating women into the mainstream of decision- making processes through regulatory and institutional reform.

    These efforts have begun to bear fruit. Kenya's next Parliament will have 48 and 16 seats reserved for women in the National Assembly and the Senate, respectively, in addition to those who will be competitively elected in the various constituencies. Furthermore, in all cases where special interests are represented in the legislature, the seats will be divided equally between men and women. Currently, women serve as members of constitutional commissions, such as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the Commission on the Implementation of the Constitution and the Public Service Commission, to name just a few. Additionally, the top two positions of any public body cannot be held by people of the same gender, thus giving an equal chance to women to either lead or eventually ascend to the top leadership positions of all public institutions.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    More than a decade has passed since the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000). Throughout that period, the United Nations system, regional organizations, Member States and civil society have made significant efforts to adapt the resolution to local settings through a wide spectrum of measures and initiatives. Progress has been made in terms of discourse and evolving practice on the participation of women in conflict prevention, resolution and peacebuilding, and awareness has increased of the threat that sexual violence constitutes to peace and security.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    Despite important national, regional and international efforts, however, the conditions that women and girls still face in situations of armed conflict continue to be abhorrent. The benefits of resolution 1325 (2000) have yet to reach most women in conflict and in fragile settings. In that regard, allow me to make the following comments. First, we view the prevention of conflict as a crucial element of resolution 1325 (2000). That includes the prevention of all forms of conflict-related violence against women and girls. Sexual violence remains the least-condemned war crime in peace agreements and beyond. The elimination of impunity is perhaps the single most effective preventive tool to fight that crime. In that regard, reforming the security sector and ensuring respect for the rule of law in a gender-responsive manner is of crucial importance. Conflict and post-conflict societies should be assisted in those areas as early as possible. The preventive aspect of resolution 1325 (2000) also includes women's full and equal involvement in conflict prevention efforts. We concur with the Secretary-General's report (S/2011/598*) that more attention needs to be paid to women's roles in the field. We support his recommendation for the Council to use its deliberations on preventive diplomacy and mediation to consider means of enhancing the role of women in conflict prevention.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    Secondly, the meaningful participation of women in decision-making forums, institutions and mechanisms related to conflict resolution and peacebuilding is essential, not only for peace but also for sustainable development and long-term security. Such participation should be treated as a requirement for building a solid and genuine democracy, which cannot be fully achieved unless the inequalities affecting half of the population are adequately addressed.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    In that sense, the political participation of women and addressing their specific needs are not solely social issues, but also good governance issues. In particular, women's engagement in peace negotiations is essential to ensure that their rights and needs are taken into account in peace agreements and institutional arrangements. Peace accord provisions could have far reaching consequences on women's engagement in post-conflict governance and on their access to justice, reparations, resources and economic security.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    Partnerships with male community leaders and opinion-shapers could also play an important role in raising awareness of the benefits of women's participation and could help to implement gender related programming at the local level.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    Thirdly, we would like to stress the importance of investing in youth, girls and boys alike, as an essential driving force behind meaningful peacebuilding efforts. Arab youth have lately become the symbol of an uprising in the name of freedom, dignity and participation. In their legitimate struggle for a better life, Arab youth groups have exhibited immense creativity. The ideals of young people are their most valuable resource for influencing the development of their societies and the shape of their future. This has been embodied by Ms. Tawakkul Karman, the first Arab woman to become a Nobel Prize laureate, along with two great women leaders from Liberia.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    Liberia continues to make progress in its efforts to involve women at decision-making levels in all areas of national governance. At critical junctures in Liberia's history, its women have demonstrated the ability to lead. Liberia holds the distinct honour of being the birthplace and home of the first woman and the first African to be appointed President of the General Assembly at its twenty-fourth session in 1970.
    In recent history, during a lull in the protracted conflict, Liberia had a female interim President, in the person of Mrs. Ruth Perry, who steered the work of a transitional Government from 1996 to 1997. Then there were the unsung heroes — the countless number of women who bravely shouldered the responsibility of caring for their families, even as they participated in discussions on peace and security, while living in the internally displaced persons and refugee camps across West Africa and further afield.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    Liberia is moving deliberately and purposefully towards the fulfilment of its commitments to women's advancement. There has been a gradual increase in women's presence in leadership and decision-making positions at the central and local Government levels. Gender-responsive policies, strategies and programmes, some of which are mentioned in the Secretary-General's report, are being integrated into all sectors of national action. In 2009, Liberia became one of the first countries to have completed its national action plans for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). This progress has been made possible through the consistent and much-appreciated support of development partners. All the same, inadequate resources remain a challenge and hindrance to robust implementation.
    We are encouraged by the recognition that has been accorded internationally to the modest achievements made by Liberia in its efforts to meaningfully involve women in national governance and to build and utilize their productive capacities, including for the consolidation of peace. Mindful that food security has a conflict preventive dimension, I cannot fail to mention that the Hunger Project's prestigious 2011 Africa Prize for Leadership was awarded a few days ago to the Liberian Minister of Agriculture, Ms. Florence Chenoweth, for her dedication to improving the livelihoods and food security of women farmers in Liberia.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    The incidence of rape of girls and women is still unacceptable high, and women constitute only 14 per cent of the Liberian legislature. We are humbled when we consider the vastness of the challenges that still lie ahead; the gender inequities that still exist; and the high walls that we still have to scale before female mediators and peace negotiators become normal features of the international peace architecture. We believe that the systematic use of quotas at the national and international levels could help to accelerate progress towards this objective. Affirmative action programmes are also required to give the necessary impetus to our effort to place women centrally in conflict prevention, mediation and peace processes.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    Through the adoption by the Security Council of resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions, the United Nations has been able to develop, integrate and fine-tune the tools available to it to address a gender perspective in a multidimensional manner, by recognizing the importance of women's active participation in the various stages of conflict prevention and resolution, as well as in peacekeeping, reconstruction and peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    We are also concerned about the low level of participation by women in peace negotiations. The exclusion of women and the lack of experts in gender matters in negotiations perpetuate inequality. As is indicated in the current report of the Secretary-General, issues related to women tend to be addressed at the later stages of conflict prevention and mediation. The Nobel Peace Prize that was awarded to outstanding women in this field this year undoubtedly sends a positive message, but it is nonetheless insufficient.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    The presence of additional female peacekeepers and female staff in peacebuilding operations, at both the military police and civilian levels, would have a clear positive effect. It is therefore necessary to increase the number of women who hold high-ranking posts in such operations. We welcome the decision of the Peacebuilding Fund to allocate $5 million to the gender promotion initiative; we hope that this will lead to tangible results in the short term.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    We believe that the provisions of these Security Council resolutions are relevant at both the international and national levels. In Mexico, following an approach to prevent violence, the institutions that are responsible for monitoring security, safety and law enforcement receive ongoing training in the field of gender affairs. As a result, more women have become involved in the administration of justice, with the notable example of the appointment of the Attorney- General, Marisela Morales — the first Mexican woman to hold this important post. In turn, the national defence agency has trained almost 80,000 personnel in the field of gender equity, and this year will see the graduation of the first female air force pilot. In the diplomatic sphere, a high number of female representatives have had a bearing my country's foreign policy, starting with Ms. Patricia Espinosa Cantellano, Minister for Foreign Affairs.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    The recommendations contained in the report of the Secretary-General are highly useful in identifying existing shortcomings in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and in ensuring the harmonization and coordination of United Nations efforts in that area. Mexico will continue to support the protection, empowerment and participation of women in decisionmaking processes, as we are fully convinced that women are key stakeholders in strengthening the three pillars of lasting peace, namely, economic recovery; social cohesion and political legitimacy. The commitment of States Members of the United Nations and of civil society is essential in order to continue to strengthen the central role played by women in the maintenance of international peace and security.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    We meet today to recognize the crucial role of women in the peaceful resolution of conflicts, the tangible fruits of which have already been seen in Afghanistan in the decisive presence of women at the Consultative Peace Jirga in 2010 and in the continuing efforts to ensure women's participation in leadership positions within and outside of the Afghan Government. The debate is particularly appropriate as Afghanistan is entering the second phase of transition to Afghan leadership and ownership and increased responsibility for security and economic development.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    With regard to development, we have begun to implement our 10-year national action plan for the women of Afghanistan based upon the priorities of the Afghanistan National Development Strategy. As part of the action plan, we have established gender units in 14 of the 25 Government ministries. However, given the 10-year timeline, accelerated efforts are necessary to ensure the full implementation of that very comprehensive action plan, which incorporates vital goals that include achieving a 30 per cent rate of representation of women in governmental positions by the end of 2013 and their 35 per cent participation rate among university students by the end of 2012.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    Ensuring the rights of women is only half of the battle; we also need to see the full participation of women, as resolution 1325 (2000) reminds us that they have a vital role to play in peace and security. The representation of women in governance and their political participation has steadily increased. We have succeeded in holding two presidential and two parliamentary elections, in which women actively participated as candidates, elections staff, poll monitors and electorates. Women comprise 25 per cent of the Parliament, thus ranking Afghanistan thirtieth among the countries of the world with the highest rate of women representatives in Parliament. The Afghanistan National parliament has also established a resource centre for women parliamentarians to enhance their capacity to effectively include women's voices and perspectives in national development and reconstruction plans. When reviewing these facts and figures, let us not lose sight of the great personal risk that these women undertake in order to participate in the governance of their country and in their future. I wish to take this opportunity to honour the women who continue take risks in order to assume an active role in the future direction, peace and security of our country.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    Our international partners have assisted the Afghan Government in our endeavours. UN-Women has administered a multi-donor trust fund for the elimination of violence against women that provided grants for national organizations to combat violence against women. I am very pleased to report that, in collaboration with UN-Women, Afghanistan has submitted its first country report on the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. The continued collaboration of our Government, international partners and both Afghan and international civil society groups will be vital to ensure the full realization of women's rights in a strong and stable Afghanistan.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    Building a stable and secure environment that enables women to live free of intimidation and violence and promotes their participation and leadership in efforts to maintain peace and security is one of the core objectives of the Afghan Government.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    We are also focusing on women political actors at national, subnational and local levels, as well as on capacity-building and advocacy strategies to enable them to obtain critical roles in high-level decisionmaking processes, policy and law-making positions in key Government institutions and to assist them in carrying out their significant political and social responsibilities. In conclusion, with the support of our partners and the international community, we will continue to work towards the full implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), while recognizing that our goal of sustainable peace and security in Afghanistan will not be achieved without the full participation of the entire Afghan nation.

  • Country

    Fiji
  • Extracts

    Fiji's commitment to the resolution is exemplified in our policies that, amongst other things, strongly encourage the recruitment of women in our security forces and their deployment with equal opportunities to peacekeeping missions. We support the global effort to increase the participation of women in UN police peacekeeping roles to 20% by 2014. We encourage the provision of pre and post deployment training of our peacekeepers and welcome further assistance and expertise in this regard. Furthermore, we support the participation and representation of women at all levels of decision-making.
  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    It seems to us more important than ever that the Security Council address the issue of women's role and participation in conflict prevention and mediation. The Arab Spring has served to forcefully remind us of that. Women have been significant actors in the transitions that have occurred in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya. In Syria and Yemen women are today continuing to fight with exceptional courage to defend their freedom, to ensure that the most fundamental human rights are respected and to make their calls for democracy heard. In this connection, I wish to welcome this year's awarding of the Noble Peace Prize to three exceptional women who are doing outstanding work in the service of peace and human rights.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    Women must continue to be represented and actively consulted in the ongoing reform processes. They must have a place at the side of their male counterparts in order to successfully carry out the transition to democracy and establish regimes that are fairer and more respectful of the freedoms of their peoples. This is about the success of the ongoing political transitions and, consequently, about the stability of the countries themselves and, in turn, about the security of the region.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    The effective implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), on women and peace and security, is a priority for France, which actively worked for its adoption, just as we have worked to strengthen awareness of this issue at the European Union, especially during our 2008 presidency of the Union. Last year, France adopted a national plan of action on the implementation of the resolution. In particular, it aims at prioritizing, at the international level, the protection of women against all forms of violence and promoting respect for their basic rights, as well as their equal participation in decision-making processes in the context of peacebuilding, reconstruction and development.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    France has undertaken commitments in the context of its plan of action to strengthen women's direct participation in reconstruction efforts and the decision making process, namely, by focusing priority on access to leadership positions. In particular, France is implementing several cooperation programmes, in partnership with UN-Women, aimed at strengthening women's participation in the decision-making process, improving their access to, and participation in, the justice sector. We are doing that by relying on civil society organizations and, in particular, women's groups, which I would like here to commend. Those programmes are being carried out in Africa and the Arab world, as well as in Afghanistan. Moreover, France is developing programmes intended to bolster the participation of women in peacekeeping operations. Our plan of action also includes initiatives to improve awareness of the need for respect for the rights of women in the context of training programmes, which is another important element in the implementation of the resolution on women, peace and security.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    I would like to thank the Secretary-General for his recent report (S/2011/598*). We agree with the bulk of its analyses. We would also like to commend the work done by UN-Women under the leadership of Ms. Bachelet. The strategic framework and follow-up indicators referred to in the report are useful tools, both for Member States and for the United Nations, in following up the implementation of the resolution on women and peace and security. Not only do they make it possible to assess results, but also to identify shortcomings in women's participation in conflict prevention and resolution. They also make it possible to refocus the efforts of the international community to ensure better protection for women in armed conflict.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    Allow me to conclude by referring to the matter of justice, which is a major issue in the implementation of the resolution on women and peace and security. How can women express themselves and participate in public life if they must live alongside their former tortures, or live in fear and under oppression? How can they have access to justice if the road to justice entails humiliation, threats and reprisals? Access to justice and combating impunity are essential elements in ensuring women's full participation. In particular, there is a duty on the part of the international community to make use of all the instruments available to it — establishing commissions of inquiry, making referrals to the International Criminal Court and putting in place targeted sanctions, in the case of serious violations and systematic assaults on the rights of women. Only then will the efforts of the international community take on genuine credibility when it comes to protecting women and promoting their participation in conflict resolution.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    We must continue to ensure that women play key roles in peacekeeping operations and political missions; we must not only look at gender as a thematic issue, but ensure that women hold key and responsible positions at every level. We endorse the recommendations of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations that a larger proportion of women be deployed in the military and police contingents of peacekeeping operations, and recruited into the armed forces and police services of Member States, with pre-deployment training for military and police on gender issues. It is through these actions that we can achieve the target of women constituting 20 per cent of peacekeeping operations by 2014, from the highest decision-making level to field operations.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    In addition, there must be dedicated budgets, targets, timelines and indicators aligned to national peacebuilding plans, overall national defence and security strategies or poverty reduction programmes. Focus in the post-conflict recovery phase must ensure that women's needs and rights are consistently addressed. My delegation supports the Secretary-General's recommendation that at least 15 per cent of United Nations funds for peacebuilding be dedicated to projects that address the specific needs of women and girls, advance gender equality and empower women. Adequate financing is vital to ensuring resources for gender training and support for non-governmental organizations and local groups that focus on issues of food security, nutrition, health and HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, education, and the rehabilitation and reintegration of women affected by war.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    The flagship agency on gender — UN-Women — has begun to prove its leadership in theimplementation of resolution 1325 (2000) through United Nations system-wide coherence. It has been able to pulled together a set of key universal and regional human rights instruments. The focus on women and peace and security can be further strengthenedthrough collaboration with humanitarian, human rights and aid- to-development agencies, and the defence forces of concerned United Nations Member States, as well as with all categories of women, including activists, war victims, refugees, asylum-seekers and migrants. To conclude, we must go forward to strengthen resolution 1325 (2000), structured on the three main pillars of participation, protection and prevention, and is a most powerful tool for women's organizing, mobilization and action.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    As outlined in the concept note (S/2011/654, annex) circulated for this debate, the participation of women in decision-making forums related to conflict prevention and resolution, peacebuilding and post conflict recovery is a central goal of the women, peace and security agenda. Research has shown that the exclusion of women and the lack of gender expertise in peace negotiations lead to irreversible setbacks for women's rights. Peace accords often neglect to ensure the engagement of women in post-conflict governance and their access to economic opportunities, justice and reparations.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Last June, women leaders from all parts of the world — Special Representative of the SecretaryGeneral Wallström among them — met in Vilnius at a conference entitled “Women Enhancing Democracy: Best Practices” under the Lithuanian presidency of the Community of Democracies, and shared their experiences and best practices in enhancing the role of women. The Working Group on Gender Equality and Women's Rights, co-chaired by the United States of America and Lithuania, discussed, among other priority issues, women and peace and security. The conference showed that, in many parts of the world, the involvement of women is still low. Indeed, women could and should play a bigger role in human rights and security monitoring and establish early warning systems to generate information about specific threats, peace talks, donor conferences, elections and decision- making.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    The Lithuanian National Programme on Equal Opportunities for Women and Men 2010-2014 raised, for the first time, gender issues in the national defence system and included measures for training gender experts who will now prepare Lithuanian personnel in this area for deployment to missions and operations. As announced by Lithuanian President Dalia Grybauskaitė during the General Assembly general debate in September (see A/66/PV.16), Lithuania drew up its first national action plan for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in 2011. We seek through the national action plan to facilitate outreach to our society concerning the aims of the resolution, to promote and protect women's rights, to encourage them to participate in international military and civil operations and missions, to involve more institutions and non-governmental organizations, and to streamline activities at all levels.
  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    Women are indispensable actors of change and development. The Arab Spring is a stage for the active participation of women in political processes. Tunisian, Egyptian and Libyan women have, today, higher and legitimate expectations than in the past regarding their role in the shaping of their countries' future. Women who have strived to make their voices heard, who have played a important role in promoting political transitions, are now looking forward to full and equal participation in the political sphere and to contribute actively to the stability, progress and cohesion of their societies
  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    The decision of the Nobel Prize Committee to award the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize to three women in recognition "for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women's rights to full participation in peace-building work" is a much deserved recognition of women's significant contribution to peacebuilding and democracy. It will undoubtedly send a powerful message to women around the world to engage in determining the future of their countries.
  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    Indeed, while acknowledging that important progress has been accomplished in the implementation of resolution 1325 and the subsequent resolutions on Women Peace and Security, we need to recognize that significant challenges still remain: women are still underrepresented at the several levels of peacekeeping and peacebuilding efforts as they are inadequately represented in formal peace negotiations. The exclusion of women from peace talks and peacebuilding efforts often means that insufficient attention is paid to addressing gender disparities and women's needs and concerns in the post conflict phase, thus reinforcing a circle of inequality and marginalization.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    In this regard, we welcome UN Women's efforts to give technical support to women's organizations and we recognize that much has been done with success at local and regional level to strengthen women's civil society groups. We also welcome every effort by Member States to promote women's political participation and to eliminate discriminatory or constitutional barriers against women. Further action is also needed on other obstacles that prevent women from participating fully in politics such as poverty, sexual violence, lack of access to education, negative societal attitudes, cultural and psychological barriers.
  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    To conclude, Madam President, Portugal has been striving to support the promotion and protection of the human rights of women but also women's political participation in situations in the agenda of the Council like in Libya, Somalia, South Sudan or in Afghanistan among others. This Council cannot afford to exclude the skills and talents of half of the world's population in the pursuit of peace. In this context, my country reaffirms its commitment to ensuring women's effective participation in peace and security and to translate this commitment into enhanced action. I thank you for your attention.
  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    Women have indeed a crucial role to play in rebuilding war torn societies and in reserving social cohesion. They did it in Europe during and after two World Wars, they did it in South America and they did it in Africa in countries divided by civilian strive. They still do it on a daily basis in several countries tormented by conflict. What is essential is to guarantee that women are included in peace processes and to ensure that their perspectives, direct knowledge of the concrete situation and concerns are taken into account as important contributions to the re-shaping of torn societies in post –conflict situations and in peacebuilding efforts.
  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    The history of resolution 1325 (2000), more than ten years of it, has clearly confirmed in practice the key role and significance of this instrument for advancing the role of women in conflict prevention and resolution and in post-conflict reconstruction and also in protecting women during conflicts. In that regard we express how pleased we are that this year the issue of women's participation in preventive diplomacy is given priority attention in the Council's presidential statement.

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    As we have said on many occasions, in various forums and events, women must not be seen just as victims in armed conflicts. That in itself would be a form of discrimination. An important precondition for eliminating discrimination against women in such situations is their full participation in all related aspects of preventive diplomacy. Women can and must make a more significant contribution to conflict prevention and resolution.

  • Country

    Ukraine
  • Extracts

    The eleventh anniversary of resolution 1325 (2000) is an opportunity to strengthen the global agenda on women and peace and security. We welcome the latest report of the Secretary-General on this issue (S/2011/598*) and take positive note of its recommendations. My country remains fully committed to the implementation of resolutions 1325 (2000), 1820 (2008) and 1888 (2009).

    Ukraine considers that ensuring gender equality, gender mainstreaming and the empowerment of women is not only an important objective, but is also an essential part of the pursuit of democracy and development. In recognition of the essential contribution of women towards achieving those objectives, Ukraine co-sponsored a draft resolution on women and political participation.

  • Country

    Ukraine
  • Extracts

    The focus of today's debate on the participation and role of women in conflict prevention and mediation could not be more timely. Ukraine has always stressed the need for the widest possible use of the potential of women in the spheres of preventive diplomacy, peacekeeping and peacebuilding. We believe that there is still much to be done to redress the current underrepresentation of women in decision- making with regard to conflict resolution so as to make their voice heard loud and clear in peace negotiations. In that context, we welcome the adoption of the first-ever resolution on “Strengthening the role of mediation in the peaceful settlement of disputes and conflict prevention and resolution” (General Assembly resolution 65/283). In that document, all Member States resolved to promote the equal, full and effective participation of women at all levels of the peaceful settlement of disputes, conflict prevention and resolution, as well as to provide adequate gender expertise for all mediators and their teams.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    Though we support the comprehensive PRST that will be adopted in this debate. I regret that because of the opposition of some, we were unable to unreservedly welcome the Secretary-General's report. The United Kingdom does whole-heartedly welcome that report. Women have a central role in building stability in countries at risk from conflict. Despite our collective efforts, they remain under-represented in peace processes, in work to detect early signs of conflict and in mediation between warring parties. Some progress has been made, but it is not until the participation of women is included throughout the conflict cycle that a durable and sustainable peace can be assured. This Council, of course, may not be the best body, with five distinguished female Permanent Representatives and Deputy Permanent Representatives, leaving the Council at the end of this year, there may be only two female PRs and DPRs next year around this table, both from the United States.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    The Arab Spring has shown that the threats to security and to women and girls in particular are changing constantly. In our work on Women, Peace and Security we must be flexible enough to respond to new threats and challenges as they emerge. There are sweeping and positive social and economic trends at work. This Council needs to show that we are responsive to these trends. On this, as on other issues, we should demonstrate that we are on the right side of history. In particular, we must ensure that new governing structures that emerge in the aftermath of conflict do not undermine women's roles and participation in society, and that the same opportunities are available to men and women.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    The United Kingdom believes that women's inclusion in political settlements and peace processes, the protection of women and girls in situations of armed violence, and women's access to security and justice, are essential building blocks for more peaceful and stable societies. In a year when the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to three impressive women, we share the hope of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, that we can together realise the great potential for democracy and peace that women represent.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    Madam President, a word on National Action Plans: The United Kingdom believes that National Action Plans provide an important opportunity for member states to make their own commitments to reduce the impact of conflict on women and girls and to promote their inclusion in conflict resolution. Over the past year, the United Kingdom has supported efforts globally to implement Resolution 1325.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    Over the past several years, the United Nations and its member states have taken important steps to increase women's participation in issues related to peace and security. We established UN Women and the Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary General for Sexual Violence in Conflict. Through this Council's work, we defined what we expect of parties to conflict with respect to the protection of women. We established a framework to track implementation of Resolution 1325. Many states, including my country, are developing national action plans to guide their engagement on issues of women, peace, and security. But all this is just a beginning. We must ensure that norms and institutional frameworks turn into action. What counts now is implementation and delivering results.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    The Secretary-General's report provides examples of both real progress and the challenges ahead of us. We welcome the initiative of DPKO and DPA to include gender components, advisors, or focal points in all field missions on this issue. We're pleased that a gender and mediation specialist has been appointed to the Standby Team of Mediation Experts to ensure that women's concerns are addressed in conflict prevention and resolution, and not just toward the end of a conflict, as is often the case. And we are encouraged that a growing number of reports to the Security Council, as well as mission mandate renewal resolutions, address issues related to women in conflict and post-conflict situations. However, as the Secretary-General noted, "mere reference to women, peace and security resolutions is not enough." We must give UN entities strong support to implement and deliver results for gender equality.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    More can be done to ensure that personnel of UN missions are adequately prepared to implement resolution 1325 and supported in their efforts. Both pre-deployment training and mission-wide strategies on the protection of civilians, including the needs of vulnerable groups such as women and girls, need to be improved. Gaps also remain in ensuring that those serving in UN missions are held accountable for their performance, particularly in the case of sexual exploitation and abuse. As the Secretary-General acknowledged, "the UN still lacks a system that enables complaints of sexual exploitation and abuse to be reported safely." The United Nations needs to lead by example by actively enforcing the zero tolerance policy on sexual exploitation and abuse by UN peacekeepers. Conflict-related sexual violence must be addressed from the very start in peace processes, and more women should be included as mediators and members of negotiating teams.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    In the Participation Pillar, the U.S. supported Afghan women's inclusion in the High Peace Council and in follow-on shuras and negotiations, in the reintegration and reconciliation process at the local level. We've also awarded $16.9 million in direct grants to Afghan women-focused NGOs. In the Protection Pillar, the U.S. contributed roughly $2 million to the office of the Special Representative of the Secretary General for sexual violence and conflict. We have provided numerous courses to foreign militaries on human rights, prevention of gender-based violence, sexual exploitation, and protection of civilians.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    In the Prevention Pillar, the U.S. has developed multiple programs that seek to address the root causes of conflict, including a $26 million annual Reconciliation Program that supports innovative programming in conflict-affected countries and includes gender analysis. In the Relief and Recovery Pillar, the U.S. has provided significant funding to improve water and sanitation in situations in which women's safety and security are at risk.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    Madame President, as we move forward on our National Action Plan, we are cognizant that, as Secretary Clinton said at a Council debate on this issue last year, "ultimately, we measure our progress by the improvements in the daily lives of people around the world. This must be our cause – and empowering women to contribute all their talents to this cause is our calling." All of us now face the critical challenge of turning our commitments on women, peace, and security into results. Through our work here in this Council, and our national efforts, we believe that we can meet this challenge together.
  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    The topic of our debate is a very timely one. Today we should acknowledge the important contribution made by women in the Arab world to bring about political transformation, and the decisive role they have played and continue to play in the quest for democracy, transparent political systems, the rule of law and the promotion and protection of human rights. It is difficult to imagine the achievements of the Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya without the active participation of women and young people, and it is difficult to imagine a successful and inclusive democratic transformation process without their active participation.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    The women and peace and security agenda has been a catalyst for greater civil society engagement with the Council. This has enriched our work, giving us access to new perspectives and information. In all societies, there are real obstacles to women's political participation. Even in countries that have championed women's rights for decades, insidious barriers to true equality persist. Today we gather to consider how to advance further towards women's full engagement in conflict resolution and mediation.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    The issue of women's participation in peace talks and other conflict-related negotiations certainly contains more than an element of justice. It is also an issue of effectiveness, which has a direct impact on the success of conflict resolution and mediation efforts. Women can bring to the table unique perspectives on issues such as impunity, accountability, and justice. If these perspectives are addressed in negotiations, the chance of achieving a sustainable peace will be much greater.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    Last month, during the general debate and at an event on women's political participation, President Dilma Rousseff made it clear that the empowerment of women is high on Brazil's agenda. We have enacted advanced legislation on the protection of women, established specialized police stations for women's issues, and put women at the centre of our Bolsa Familia cash transfer programme. These are valuable experiences that we are ready to share with other countries, including those emerging from conflict.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    Brazil is deeply engaged in cooperation activities with a number of countries emerging from conflict. In Brazil, the participation of women in the decision-making processes that deal with those issues has been steadily increasing, in keeping with the broad trend observed in Brazilian politics more generally, both in the executive and legislative branches. Today, nearly a third of the ministers in President Dilma's Cabinet are women, including many of those charged with core Government responsibilities. Women have also moved to the forefront of Brazilian diplomacy, occupying more and higher-level postings in our foreign service.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    The PRST to be adopted today clearly recognizes once again the significant role of women in prevention, conflict resolution and post conflict rebuilding. Including women in peace initiatives is not a benevolent act, we see it as a key requirement to any lasting, sustainable peace. Women's participation will strengthen the capacity to resolve conflict and build security and justice systems that protect the human rights of all. However, we have still existing gaps between repeated commitments and the situation on the ground. Women remain severely under-represented in peace negotiations and they are often marginalized in efforts to build sustainable peace.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    What can be done to close this gap? First, in regard to the UN level, we commend UN Women for its work in leading the mainstreaming efforts to include, wherever possible, a gender perspective in UN activities and measuring progress made in implementing resolution 1325 against the indicators. It is crucial to constantly strive for more women in leading positions, also within the UN, and to give women a voice during all stages of peace processes. There is a clear link between women's participation in the early stages of preventive diplomacy, peace-making or peace-building and their presence in implementation mechanisms.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Third, with regard to the national level: Last year the German Government presented its third report to Parliament on its implementation of SR resolution 1325. It contains, inter alia, projects on gender training, including for UN peacekeepers, prevention of sexual violence, enabling women's participation in peace-processes as well as their unhindered access to justice. A special focus lies on the support for women's organizations and NGOs in promoting women's empowerment. In addition, the German Government has set up action plans on “gender in development aid programmes” and on “civilian crisis prevention”. Germany implements the indicators adopted by the European Union in 2010.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Fourth and last, the Security Council could do more to systematically integrate women, peace and security issues in its daily work, including when mandating or renewing UN missions. Envoys and Special Representatives should address those issues, where relevant, in their briefings to the Council. I would like to conclude, Madam President, by expressing Germany's support for the presidential statement adopted today.
  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    However, as has so often been emphasised, a focus on the way that conflict can victimise women should not lead us to obscure the role that women can play as agents of conflict resolution and recovery – or in the words of the Nobel Committee, “to realise the great potential for democracy and peace that women can represent”.
    More than simply a question of the right of women to participate in peace-making or peacebuilding - which of course it is – the report of the Secretary-General acknowledges what women bring to the table, and what their absence implies. Efforts at peace that accord women prominent and active roles have a better chance of successfully addressing key postconflict issues. The corollary is equally clear: "exclusion of women and a lack of gender expertise in negotiations leads to irreversible setbacks for women's rights... women's engagement in post-conflict governance and women's access to economic opportunity"
  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    While the passage of Resolution 1325 and the four subsequent resolutions represented a paradigm shift in relation to women and conflict, there remains a striking reluctance in many quarters to include women as full and equal partners in peace efforts. Of the nine peace agreements signed during the course of 2010, only two had provisions ensuring women's rights. There is a basic design flaw that needs to be addressed. Peace processes in general are not set up to engage non-traditional actors like women's groups or other civil society organisations. That must change. Processes need to be structured from the outset to draw more fully on non-formal and non-traditional influences where women, woven into the social fabric of societies, have so much to offer. The mediation phase, when things remain in flux, presents a good opportunity to empower and include such groups. As the Secretary-General points out in his report, it is critical that women peace-builders and mediators are engaged as early as possible in the conflict prevention/resolution cycle.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    And not just the inclusion of women negotiators, but more broadly a gender perspective, so that gender is established as a thread running through all major peace-building issues, rather than being parked on its own as a discrete topic. Gender is not a box to be ticked, a nod to political correctness. Its place is not at the end of a long list – it is a concern which should condition the approach from start to finish. The promise and potential of women peace-builders was evident to a delegation of women Ambassadors, including Ireland's Ambassador to the African Union, that paid a visit to Sudan earlier this year and met with a cross-section of women peace-builders, legislators and IDPs. The delegation's report noted the determination of women to play a full role in conflict prevention efforts and recommended that international organisations take on more responsibility for implementing women, peace and security priorities.
  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    The Arab Spring provides a crucible for addressing the questions of representation and participation of women. Striking and inspirational early roles in Cairo, Benghazi and elsewhere have given way to a sense of women being side-lined. The risks for women are obvious: revolutions begin on the streets but, at a later stage, key decisions may be taken in smoke filled rooms. In that transition, women all too easily lose out: their courage helped to make the revolution but their inexperience of power can allow others to shape the outcomes. Special Representative Wallstrom has previously referred to the risk that the Arab Spring could turn into a cold winter for Arab women. As these societies and interim governments continue to adjust and to settle, the international community must use its leverage to ensure that democratic changes underway are seen through - and that the full role promised to women is realised.
  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    Ireland's principal pledge at last year's debate on women, peace and security was to develop, adopt and launch a National Action on Resolution 1325. I am pleased to announce that Ireland has recently adopted a National Action Plan, and that this plan will be officially launched in the coming weeks. The Plan was informed by a cross-learning initiative that brought together women from Timor-Leste, Liberia, Ireland and Northern Ireland to discuss the most critical issues facing women and girls in conflict and post-conflict settings. As we implement our National Action Plan, Ireland will continue to listen to the voices of women affected by conflict, to strengthen institutional capacities through comprehensive training of personnel deploying overseas, and to support programmes that promote women's participation. In their Peace Prize citation earlier this month, the Nobel Committee wrote that "we cannot achieve democracy and lasting peace in the world unless women obtain the same opportunities as men to influence developments at all levels of society". That is not just a worthy sentiment in a citation – it is a bald statement of reality, and one that demands our full and urgent attention.
  • Country

    Kyrgyzstan
  • Extracts

    Kyrgyzstan has made significant headway over the past two years in promoting the participation of women in the country's political life, conducting democratic reforms and peace-based initiatives. The 2010 national referendum resulted in the election of the first female president in Central Asia. Today, women occupy nearly one-third of the parliamentary seats. They also hold the posts of President of the Supreme Court, Prosecutor General and President of the National Bank. Women also hold posts as ministers, governors and heads of various non-governmental organizations.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    Although women's participation in Tunisia's recent elections has not lived up to all expectations, we are confident that Tunisian women will be able to assume, at all levels and in all political and economic institutions, their responsibilities in the work of building their country, and that they will thereby set an example for other countries in the region and around the world. We urge Libyan leaders to grant women their full and proper place in the construction of the new Libya. We express our solidarity with the women of Yemen and Syria, who continue to fight against oppression and for their rights to freedom and democracy.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    The international community must continue to strive in pursuit of peace and security, and should makeuse of the capacities of women as agents of change. This year, the Nobel Committee recognized the efforts of women who fought, in different areas, to achieve peace — proof of the added value of their work and of the importance of continuing such an effort, for which the cooperation of my Government can always be counted on.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    Since the adoption of landmark resolution 1325 (2000), progress has been achieved across a broad range of issues aimed at enhancing the protection and promotion of the rights of women and girls in conflict- affected situations. A stronger gender perspective in post-conflict processes, as well as in United Nations programming and reporting, has been steadily built. The issues of gender equality and the empowerment of women have become critical components of political deliberations and actions. All in all, a better understanding is taking hold. We heartily welcome and commend the United Nations entities, non- governmental organizations and women's organizations that are working selflessly in this area. Yet as today's debate and the Secretary-General's report have shown us, there remain formidable challenges before us. Many structural and institutional impediments persist. Women continue to be largely marginalized in the national and international decision- making spheres because of persistent challenges, such as discriminatory laws, cultural stereotypes, lack of education, inability to access basic services, and sparse economic opportunities, to name a few. We firmly believe that the participation of women and the incorporation of gender perspectives in all contexts are vitally

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    The positive ramifications of increasing women's participation in every context and at every stage of political transition are widely recognized and critically important. Situations of political transition should be perceived as providing opportunities for enhancing women's roles in decision-making at every level. It is equally important to redouble our efforts to combat impunity. Unfortunately, armed conflict and post- conflict disorder hit women and children the hardest. Targeted measures should be directed at the perpetrators of sexual violence and rape. We should all ensure that effective international mechanisms are established to respond to such crimes and bring their perpetrators to justice.

  • Country

    Burundi
  • Extracts

    To implement resolution 1325 (2000), the Government of Burundi has decided that no strategy will be adopted or implemented without taking into clear account the gender dimension, so as to guarantee the full participation of women in decision-making, in prioritizing plans of action and in implementing them. As things stand, our National Plan of Action on resolution 1325 (2000) has been drafted and its adoption by the Council of Ministers is expected next month. The plan is designed to respond to the Government's national and international priorities, which are reflected in national policy documents, such as the “Strategic Framework for Combating Poverty, Second Generation”, “Vision 2025” and the revised version of the national gender policy. The substance of resolution 1325 (2000) on women and peace and security is chiefly built around four pillars — participation, prevention, protection and recovery. In terms of participation in decision-making, Burundi has made significant progress. For example, the 30 per cent rate stipulated by the country's Constitution has been exceeded during the post- election nominations in 2010. Nine of the 21 ministerial positions are currently held by women — equal to 43 per cent. With that percentage Burundi leads the rest of Africa. Our rate of women's representation in the Senate places Burundi in first place in Africa and in second place worldwide, after Bolivia.

  • Country

    Burundi
  • Extracts

    In hiring practices for both civil service and private industry, women and men go through the same selection process and have an equal chance. In many cases, applications from women are strongly encouraged. In matters of peace and security, Burundi's National Security Council includes 2 women among its seven members. Plans for gender integration in the police force and the army have already been adopted by the relevant ministries, and currently women are increasingly included as part of peacekeeping missions on the ground in other countries.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Women are vulnerable in conflict situations and therefore require special attention. Women can make unique contributions to the maintenance of international peace and security, and their potentials must be further tapped. The Security Council's adoption of resolution 1325 (2000) was important progress in the efforts of the international community to protect women's rights and interests. However, there remains a lot to do in comprehensively implementing that resolution. I wish to emphasize four points.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Secondly, ensuring the participation of women in conflict resolution and prevention and in rehabilitation and reconstruction is an important part of the efforts to implement resolution 1325 (2000). China supports a bigger role for women in good offices and dispute mediation. We hope the Secretary-General will appoint more female special representatives and special envoys, and we hope to see greater participation by women in United Nations good offices and mediation concerning major international and regional hotspots.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Thirdly, in conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction, the national ownership of the government and people concerned must be respected. The international community can provide constructive help, but it must adhere to the United Nations Charter and the principle of non-interference in internal affairs. In safeguarding the rights and interests of women and enhancing their role in peace and security, specific national conditions and historical and cultural differences must be fully taken into account. A uniform approach is not desirable.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    In order to prevent the recurrence of conflict and sustain long-standing peace, the needs of women and girls must be fully addressed in post-conflict peacebuilding. To that end, it is essential that women's full and effective participation be ensured from the very beginning of conflict prevention and mediation processes.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    The promotion of women's participation in peacekeeping and peacebuilding is key to the protection and empowerment of women. The strengthening of gender expertise and perspectives in peacekeeping activities and increasing the number of female peacekeepers remain a challenge. In that regard, Japan deployed a female military liaison officer to the United Nations Integrated Mission in Timor-Leste this year. We also provide gender training to Japanese personnel before they are deployed to peacekeeping operations. This year, through the United Nations Development Programme, Japan is supporting a project to promote the employment of female police officers and their training in Afghanistan, which so far has resulted in the employment of more than 1,200 Afghan women in local police forces.

  • Country

    Netherlands
  • Extracts

    In past years, important initiatives and strategies have been developed, and many examples of joint achievements, such as the ones I mentioned in Burundi and Afghanistan, are at hand. The Netherlands is one of a group of countries that work hard and make real progress. These are important accomplishments, but far more needs to be done. To quote our Minister for Foreign Affairs, Uri Rosenthal: “Women represent 50 per cent of human capital, and it is in every country's own interest — and especially in the so-called fragile States — to make sure that women are actively involved in society, the economy and political decision- making. They must be part of the power structures; that is what empowerment is about”. Only if we manage to include women can we be more assured that peace in those societies will be sustainable, and, by doing so, global stability will be promoted as well.

  • Country

    Netherlands
  • Extracts

    At this very moment, the Dutch ministries and civil society are developing the second resolution 1325(2000) national action plan for the period 2012-2015, to be launched in December. While the first action plan focused on the physical and legal security of women and men, this second national action plan is fully dedicated to the enhancement of female leadership and the political participation of women in conflict-affected societies. Peace and security are linked to the playing of active, powerful roles by women. The power of women to positively influence situations of crisis was shown beautifully by the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize winners Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, Leymah Gbowee and Tawakkul Karman. In his words of congratulation, the Dutch Minister for Foreign Affairs said: “The fact that these three women have been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their struggle for freedom, peace and stability in the world is an excellent example of the fact that women are not solely victims, but current and future leaders.”

  • Country

    S. Korea
  • Extracts

    Secondly, women's participation at all stages of the peace process needs to be enhanced. The exclusion of women and the lack of gender expertise in negotiations may lead to irreversible setbacks for women's rights, leaving crucial issues such women's engagement in post-conflict governance neglected in peace accords. Efforts to increase women's participation in decision-making bodies need to be sustained.

  • Country

    Senegal
  • Extracts

    My country has allocated a significant part of its budget to education and health, and on 14 May 2010, it adopted a law to establish full parity in all partially or fully elected bodies. In that manner, Senegal intends to ensure the effective participation of women in decision-making processes. To follow up on that law, a national gender-parity monitoring body was set up and will be officially inaugurated on 16 November. Senegal has already adopted its national action plan to implement resolution 1325 (2000). Furthermore, it has sought to make a positive contribution to drafting the action plan of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and the Dakar Declaration by focusing on the four following areas: first, effective participation of women in the peace process; secondly, protection of women and girls; thirdly, prevention of gender-based violence through preventive diplomacy and early warning systems, and fourthly, reconstruction and victim assistance.

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    We also believe that the establishment of UN-Women was a key step in the consolidation of the women and peace and security agenda, embodied, inter alia, in technical assistance that the entity is providing to countries of all regions in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions. We wish in particular to express our appreciation for the cooperation of UN-Women in the ongoing drafting of Argentina's national action plan, which has been created on the basis of a series priority areas of our domestic and international policy, including the defence of multilateralism, contributions to peace processes, the promotion and protection of human rights, gender equality, and the protection of civilians in conflict. Another priority is increasing the political participation of women and including the gender perspective in all matters related to peace and security at the national, regional and international levels.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    One year ago this month, Canada announced its Action Plan which seeks to enhance the participation of women in peace processes. We encourage the meaningful participation of women in all elements of peacemaking. We also promote efforts to protect the human rights and physical safety of women and girls, including against rape as a weapon of war and all forms of sexual violence in conflict.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    During his recent visit to Tripoli, Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs the Honourable John Baird met with Libyan women's groups to discuss the important role that women's leadership will play in the new Libya and its democratic institutions. The Minister urged the new government of Libya to ensure the participation of women in decision-making during Libya's transition. Libya is an example of an environment in which barriers to women's access to peace processes and to reconstruction efforts will need to be addressed by all those involved.

  • Country

    Israel
  • Extracts

    In a region where women are too often excluded from public life, Israeli women stand out as leaders in law, politics, mediation and conflict prevention and resolution.

  • Country

    Nepal
  • Extracts

    The Government of Nepal is proud to inform the international community that it has adopted a national action plan for the implementation of resolutions 1325 (2000) and 1820 (2008) for the five-year period from 2011 to 2015. For Nepal, a country coming out of conflict, the adoption of a national action plan is a manifestation of our commitment to making the role of women in peacebuilding and the country's overall governance prominent. Our national action plan is time-bound and structured around five pillars, namely, participation, protection and prevention, promotion, relief and recovery, and monitoring and evaluation. The plan was prepared with the broadest possible consultations with all stakeholders, and as such it implies their important role in its implementation. In particular, the growing awareness of the rights of women and their increasing role in local governance, women-specific issues and development-related activities are good signs of progress, which we can attribute to the recent transformation in Nepal.

  • Country

    Nepal
  • Extracts

    We are ready and eager to collaborate with the international community for effective implementation of our national action plan. As enshrined in Nepal's Interim Constitution, one third of Parliament is represented by women. This political representation will be continued down to village-level elected bodies. Local peace committees are functioning in all districts with at least 33 per cent of participation of women, and are empowered to address post-conflict-related issues at the local level. Nepal has been implementing gender-based budgeting for some years, through which gender mainstreaming gets special attention in all development activities. We have introduced a policy of affirmative action in various areas, including the civil service, with a view to ensuring that women are placed at public sector decision-making levels. We are also committed to increasing the number of women in our army and police forces.

  • Country

    Maldives
  • Extracts

    Maldives has expressed support for Libya's National Transitional Council. With its current transition from conflict to creating a stable Government, we urge the National Transitional Council to stay mindful of the specific needs of women and its obligations towards them. That includes everything from disarmament and reconciliation to women's participation and representation. The path towards democracy is never easy, and women are often the first to be forgotten.

Peace Processes
  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The five-year plans formulated by the Government of India for economic development recognize the important role of women as agents of sustained socio-economic growth and change by incorporating proposals on gender empowerment. Women's empowerment is essential to promote overall sustainable development. That is also true in conflict situations. We believe that the participation of women in all stages of the peace process — conflict prevention, peace negotiations, peacekeeping and post-conflict reconstruction — is essential for lasting peace and security.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    To conclude, let me reiterate that the responsibility to implement relevant Security Council resolutions on enhancing women's participation in peace processes, including the protection of women, rests primarily with individual Governments. Through this debate, we can once again reaffirm our readiness to promote the participation of women in peace processes, including within the framework of Security Council resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    We are committed to gender equality and the empowerment of women. We are currently in the process of drafting a national action plan on resolution 1325 (2000). Efforts are already under way to promote that resolution and to raise awareness of gender-based violence, human rights and peacebuilding through the training of women's groups, survivors of violence, men and youth. Community mediators, 50 per cent of whom are women, have been trained to assist in situations involving local conflict. Involving women at the outset has had an exponentially beneficial effect in Timor- Leste and has laid the foundation for women's participation and inclusion, not only in Government, but also across all sectors. We are proud to note that women's representation in our Parliament is at 29 per cent, and we have set a goal to reach 35 per cent representation by 2015. The recently adopted electoral law requires that every third candidate on party lists be a woman, thereby ensuring that this target will be reached.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    It is not possible to create a legitimate and durable post-conflict political system that does not include the full and equal participation of women in decision-making. The role of women in economic development must be recognized in order to grow a post-conflict economy. Women, after all, are most likely to be providing direct support to children and extended kinship networks. Bringing the voice of women to the forefront of conflict prevention and mediation work will therefore help build more resilient communities and a more sustainable peace. That is key to the Security Council's work.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    In our own Asia-Pacific region we have seen great improvements in women's capacity to engage in peace processes that affect them. That is also a key focus of our own aid programme in the region. In Indonesia and Nepal, we have supported women mediators, negotiators and advisers to identify and implement strategies for improving women's participation in peace processes. That important work continues to document best practices related to women and peacemaking in the Asia-Pacific region.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    South Africa welcomes the convening of this important meeting. The adoption of the historic resolution 1325 (2000) 11 years ago was a significant milestone in the recognition of the role that women can play in the maintenance of international peace and security, particularly in decision-making processes relating to conflict prevention and resolution. In light of that achievement, South Africa is encouraged by the various frameworks that have been created to ensure the implementation of that resolution, in particular the creation of UN-Women under the leadership of Ms. Michele Bachelet.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Indeed, inroads have been made in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), as highlighted in the Secretary-General's report (S/2011/598*). However, let us be clear that gaps remain in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), as well as glaring disparities pertaining to the role of women in preventive diplomacy, formal peace processes and mediation. We therefore welcome the institutional and policy frameworks elaborated in the Secretary-General's report, in particular his seven point action plan for gender-responsive peacebuilding, which seeks to establish standard operating procedures for gender issues in the United Nations, conflict resolution and peacebuilding architecture.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    We further welcome the practical recommendations and the strategic results framework outlined in the Secretary-General's report, which constitute a concrete proposal to include women in conflict prevention and mediation. In particular, we wish to highlight the importance of nominating women to lead negotiation processes and increasing the number of women in the foreign services and security establishments.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Based on its past experience, South Africa is conscious of the centrality of women as peacemakers and facilitators in political processes and peacebuilding initiatives, particularly at the grass-roots level. Women at all levels of society have a role to play in conflict prevention and peacebuilding as agents of change. In that regard, South African Women in Dialogue has been actively engaged with women's organizations in countries such as Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Sudan in sharing experiences and lessons learned with women in States emerging from conflict. South Africa continues to contribute to popularizing the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) through structures such as the Southern African Development Community, the African Union and the Pan-African Women's Organization. To that end, South Africa recently held the Progressive Women's Movement of South Africa Summit on Women, Peace and Security in May.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Indeed, in congratulating the three outstanding women who were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize this year, President Johnson-Sirleaf of Liberia, her compatriot Ms. Leymah Gbowee and Ms. Tawakkul Karman of Yemen, President Jacob Zuma underscored the important contribution that women continue to play in their ongoing struggle for women's rights, dignity, peace and development all over the world. The vast majority of women are not involved in creating wars, but they remain the primary victims of war and conflict. Long after the guns have ceased blazing, their children and families continue to suffer the devastating effects of the aftermath of conflict. Women are the ones left to pick up the pieces and to rebuild families and their communities.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    Women must be fully involved from the very beginning of peace processes so as to enhance the quality and sustainability of peace agreements. Mediation and negotiation teams should have specialized gender expertise and carry out inclusive consultations. Further efforts are urgently needed to nominate and appoint more women mediators and to address the obstacles women face. Increasing the number of women in international organizations and in national diplomatic services is one tool for enlarging the pool of qualified women. At the same time, guidance and expertise is needed for mediators to integrate a gender perspective in ceasefire and in peace agreements. The Nordic countries welcome the work of UNWomen and fully support its joint strategy with the Department of Political Affairs on gender and mediation as an effective tool.

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    An important aspect of our debate is the link between preventive diplomacy and the Council's initiatives to promote the role of women in peace processes. More than 10 years of continued efforts to implement resolution 1325 (2000) have revealed the limits of a reactive approach. Gabon supports a more comprehensive approach aimed at incorporating conflict prevention as a fundamental part of an effective strategy to protect women and young girls from the agony of conflict and war. Through such a strategy, women would have leading roles, which of course entails women playing a part in the policy sphere in peacetime so that they can be fully involved in the different stages of mediation and political negotiation in times of crisis. In this regard, regional and sub-regional organizations, namely African organizations, should also adopt such a strategy. The African Union's incorporation of gender parity in the highest positions of its hierarchy is a strong indication of a move in that direction.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    If we want to see tangible progress in this area, more needs to be done at the national, regional, and international levels. First, women and women's rights must be consistently included in peace talks. Women are formidable negotiators, mediators and peace-builders. But all too often they are denied access to negotiations at the highest level because of the lack of political will or commitment. A transparent and inclusive peace process involving representatives of every component of society, including women, is the most likely to succeed.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    Second, women's rights must be an integral part of peace agreements. One of the measurement of the success of a peace settlement is the extent to which obligations under the Convention on the Discrimination against Women and other international human rights conventions are fulfilled.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    Third, it is not enough to simply advocate the participation of women in peace processes. We need to provide concrete support for women to build the skills needed for meaningful involvement. And education is crucial. At the same time, social barriers blocking women's access to peace processes need to be addressed. Since men are also a part of the equation, civic education and human rights programmes for both men and women at the community level can help lift these barriers and hammer home the importance of gender inclusiveness. We must also support civil society organizations, in particular women's groups, which are vital to creating better links among women and between state and community.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    In December 2010 Italy adopted a three-year action plan on Resolution 1325. The plan provides a strategic framework to improve implementation of 1325 by having a national focal point at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs monitor all relevant activities. The plan focuses on key goals such as: increasing the number of women in the national Police and in the armed Forces; strengthening the inclusion of women in peace operations and in the decision-making bodies of peace operations; protecting the human rights of women and children, in conflict and post-conflict; strengthening women's participation in peace processes; and engaging with civil society organizations to promote the implementation of Resolution 1325.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    Although women are widely recognized as effective agents of peace, they still have little access to decision-making positions and peace negotiations. Women in the aftermath of conflict have little or no protection or access to services, justice and economic security, and those are the areas in which women's needs and gaps in response are most evident. Furthermore, the inclusion of women and gender expertise in peacebuilding activities is essential to reconstituting political, legal, cultural and socio- economic and social structures. Gender equality brings new degrees of democratic inclusiveness to peacebuilding, faster and more durable economic growth, and human and social capital recovery.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    Those opportunities, however, can be enhanced significantly depending on how the international community sets its priorities for recovery and uses its strategies for peacebuilding. Those priorities should consist of specific national and international policies aimed at increasing women's participation in conflict prevention and resolution, mediation, peace negotiations and peacebuilding. The integrationof the resolution has to be country-driven, and Member States need to take responsibility for its success by ensuring that it is integrated into national policies. We urge countries to apply a broad gendermainstreaming approach across Government, for instance through a system-wide approach that links development, humanitarian and defence issues. All plans should include civil society consultations, as well as monitoring and reporting mechanisms.

  • Speaker

    The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)
  • Extracts

    The Security Council's consideration of the subject of women, peace and security 11 years ago, which resulted in the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), was a landmark event in the recognition of importance of women's equal participation and full involvement in the maintenance of peace and security, including in conflict management, peacekeeping and post-conflict peacebuilding. The engagement of the Security Council on this issue built on the work done by the Economic and Social Council on gender equality and women's empowerment. I wish to believe that the Economic and Social Council was catalytic in that regard by virtue of its historic adoption of agreed conclusions on gender mainstreaming at its substantive session in 1997 and of the annual follow-up that it has carried out on the matter since then.

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    Although Ms. Bachelet aptly highlighted the modest progress made by Member States and the United Nations in advancing the agenda of resolution 1325 (2000), we must heed her warning that we are very far from sufficiently and systematically integrating women into the process of conflict prevention and peacebuilding. We believe that this is an auspicious moment in the history of the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). The draft presidential statement that is to be adopted today could not have come at a better time, coming as it does in the aftermath of the recognition by the Nobel Committee of the role and participation of the three eminent women in conflict resolution and peace processes in their respective communities. While congratulating President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, Ms. Leymah Gbowee and Ms. Tawakkul Karman for their groundbreaking achievement, we share the hope of the Nobel Committee that this recognition of the important place of women in the peace process, which the draft presidential statement echoes loudly, is a watershed moment and paradigm shift in the global effort to implement resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    We note with satisfaction that the draft presidential statement accords with the theme of this open debate, namely, “The role and participation of women in conflict prevention and mediation”. Through the draft presidential statement, the Council recognizes that women can, and do, play crucial roles in the prevention of conflict. Nevertheless, it also notes that more needs to be done to create the enabling conditions for the participation of women in all stages of the peace process.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    My country is convinced that peace, development and democracy cannot be carried out without the full participation of women in public life and in the decision-making process.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    In that sense, the political participation of women and addressing their specific needs are not solely social issues, but also good governance issues. In particular, women's engagement in peace negotiations is essential to ensure that their rights and needs are taken into account in peace agreements and institutional arrangements. Peace accord provisions could have far reaching consequences on women's engagement in post-conflict governance and on their access to justice, reparations, resources and economic security.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    Since the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), discussions have revealed many examples of women's effective contribution to conflict prevention, peace processes and peacebuilding in the various regions of the world. Women bear the consequences of conflict and are thus well placed to contribute to solutions. Having reached this realization, our common challenge is to find creative means to institutionalize this role at the national and international levels. Women must be capacitated and strategically positioned to play their rightful role.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    The incidence of rape of girls and women is still unacceptable high, and women constitute only 14 per cent of the Liberian legislature. We are humbled when we consider the vastness of the challenges that still lie ahead; the gender inequities that still exist; and the high walls that we still have to scale before female mediators and peace negotiators become normal features of the international peace architecture. We believe that the systematic use of quotas at the national and international levels could help to accelerate progress towards this objective. Affirmative action programmes are also required to give the necessary impetus to our effort to place women centrally in conflict prevention, mediation and peace processes.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    Liberia pledges to make more concerted efforts to comply with reporting requirements so as to contribute meaningfully to future reports of the Secretary-General on women and peace and security. The presence of UN-Women in Liberia provides the needed support to national efforts to implement resolution 1325 (2000) and reduce gender inequities. We therefore look forward to continued partnership with UN-Women towards the enhancement of women's empowerment, peacebuilding and sustainable development. It is our hope that, in the not too distant future, the capacities of women will be so fully integrated into the global peace architecture that the focus of debates on conflict prevention and mediation will not be on women's role and participation but simply on the subject matter.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    We are also concerned about the low level of participation by women in peace negotiations. The exclusion of women and the lack of experts in gender matters in negotiations perpetuate inequality. As is indicated in the current report of the Secretary-General, issues related to women tend to be addressed at the later stages of conflict prevention and mediation. The Nobel Peace Prize that was awarded to outstanding women in this field this year undoubtedly sends a positive message, but it is nonetheless insufficient.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    The prevention of the violation of women and girls' human rights, including sexual violence, must enjoy the highest priority. It is high time that we bring war criminals to justice, end impunity for their atrocities, and invest in immediate service and assistance mechanisms for women and girl war crime victims. Our focus must also be on including women in peace processes as mediators, members of negotiating parties, and signatories to peace agreements.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    As outlined in the concept note (S/2011/654, annex) circulated for this debate, the participation of women in decision-making forums related to conflict prevention and resolution, peacebuilding and post conflict recovery is a central goal of the women, peace and security agenda. Research has shown that the exclusion of women and the lack of gender expertise in peace negotiations lead to irreversible setbacks for women's rights. Peace accords often neglect to ensure the engagement of women in post-conflict governance and their access to economic opportunities, justice and reparations.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    The Council must increase its efforts to incorporate a gender perspective in relevant country specific resolutions, with a view to increasing women's participation in peace negotiations and mediation and in meeting the specific concerns of women during post-conflict reconstruction. The Council must also, hand in hand with the General Assembly, address the lack of women as lead peace mediators by encouraging the Secretary-General to appoint women to such positions and to ensure that adequate gender expertise is provided for all United Nations-led peace processes.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    Indeed, while acknowledging that important progress has been accomplished in the implementation of resolution 1325 and the subsequent resolutions on Women Peace and Security, we need to recognize that significant challenges still remain: women are still underrepresented at the several levels of peacekeeping and peacebuilding efforts as they are inadequately represented in formal peace negotiations. The exclusion of women from peace talks and peacebuilding efforts often means that insufficient attention is paid to addressing gender disparities and women's needs and concerns in the post conflict phase, thus reinforcing a circle of inequality and marginalization.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    Women have indeed a crucial role to play in rebuilding war torn societies and in reserving social cohesion. They did it in Europe during and after two World Wars, they did it in South America and they did it in Africa in countries divided by civilian strive. They still do it on a daily basis in several countries tormented by conflict. What is essential is to guarantee that women are included in peace processes and to ensure that their perspectives, direct knowledge of the concrete situation and concerns are taken into account as important contributions to the re-shaping of torn societies in post –conflict situations and in peacebuilding efforts.
  • Country

    Ukraine
  • Extracts

    The focus of today's debate on the participation and role of women in conflict prevention and mediation could not be more timely. Ukraine has always stressed the need for the widest possible use of the potential of women in the spheres of preventive diplomacy, peacekeeping and peacebuilding. We believe that there is still much to be done to redress the current underrepresentation of women in decision- making with regard to conflict resolution so as to make their voice heard loud and clear in peace negotiations. In that context, we welcome the adoption of the first-ever resolution on “Strengthening the role of mediation in the peaceful settlement of disputes and conflict prevention and resolution” (General Assembly resolution 65/283). In that document, all Member States resolved to promote the equal, full and effective participation of women at all levels of the peaceful settlement of disputes, conflict prevention and resolution, as well as to provide adequate gender expertise for all mediators and their teams.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    Though we support the comprehensive PRST that will be adopted in this debate. I regret that because of the opposition of some, we were unable to unreservedly welcome the Secretary-General's report. The United Kingdom does whole-heartedly welcome that report. Women have a central role in building stability in countries at risk from conflict. Despite our collective efforts, they remain under-represented in peace processes, in work to detect early signs of conflict and in mediation between warring parties. Some progress has been made, but it is not until the participation of women is included throughout the conflict cycle that a durable and sustainable peace can be assured. This Council, of course, may not be the best body, with five distinguished female Permanent Representatives and Deputy Permanent Representatives, leaving the Council at the end of this year, there may be only two female PRs and DPRs next year around this table, both from the United States.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    The United Kingdom believes that women's inclusion in political settlements and peace processes, the protection of women and girls in situations of armed violence, and women's access to security and justice, are essential building blocks for more peaceful and stable societies. In a year when the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to three impressive women, we share the hope of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, that we can together realise the great potential for democracy and peace that women represent.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    More can be done to ensure that personnel of UN missions are adequately prepared to implement resolution 1325 and supported in their efforts. Both pre-deployment training and mission-wide strategies on the protection of civilians, including the needs of vulnerable groups such as women and girls, need to be improved. Gaps also remain in ensuring that those serving in UN missions are held accountable for their performance, particularly in the case of sexual exploitation and abuse. As the Secretary-General acknowledged, "the UN still lacks a system that enables complaints of sexual exploitation and abuse to be reported safely." The United Nations needs to lead by example by actively enforcing the zero tolerance policy on sexual exploitation and abuse by UN peacekeepers. Conflict-related sexual violence must be addressed from the very start in peace processes, and more women should be included as mediators and members of negotiating teams.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    The effective representation and full involvement of women in peace processes, in transitional governments and in political life is a prerequisite for addressing their specific needs and concerns and for ensuring that their rights are adequately reflected in State structures, peace agreements, law enforcement processes, et cetera. One half of the population cannot claim to represent the other half. Women need to represent themselves.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    The issue of women's participation in peace talks and other conflict-related negotiations certainly contains more than an element of justice. It is also an issue of effectiveness, which has a direct impact on the success of conflict resolution and mediation efforts. Women can bring to the table unique perspectives on issues such as impunity, accountability, and justice. If these perspectives are addressed in negotiations, the chance of achieving a sustainable peace will be much greater.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Third, with regard to the national level: Last year the German Government presented its third report to Parliament on its implementation of SR resolution 1325. It contains, inter alia, projects on gender training, including for UN peacekeepers, prevention of sexual violence, enabling women's participation in peace-processes as well as their unhindered access to justice. A special focus lies on the support for women's organizations and NGOs in promoting women's empowerment. In addition, the German Government has set up action plans on “gender in development aid programmes” and on “civilian crisis prevention”. Germany implements the indicators adopted by the European Union in 2010.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    While the passage of Resolution 1325 and the four subsequent resolutions represented a paradigm shift in relation to women and conflict, there remains a striking reluctance in many quarters to include women as full and equal partners in peace efforts. Of the nine peace agreements signed during the course of 2010, only two had provisions ensuring women's rights. There is a basic design flaw that needs to be addressed. Peace processes in general are not set up to engage non-traditional actors like women's groups or other civil society organisations. That must change. Processes need to be structured from the outset to draw more fully on non-formal and non-traditional influences where women, woven into the social fabric of societies, have so much to offer. The mediation phase, when things remain in flux, presents a good opportunity to empower and include such groups. As the Secretary-General points out in his report, it is critical that women peace-builders and mediators are engaged as early as possible in the conflict prevention/resolution cycle.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    And not just the inclusion of women negotiators, but more broadly a gender perspective, so that gender is established as a thread running through all major peace-building issues, rather than being parked on its own as a discrete topic. Gender is not a box to be ticked, a nod to political correctness. Its place is not at the end of a long list – it is a concern which should condition the approach from start to finish. The promise and potential of women peace-builders was evident to a delegation of women Ambassadors, including Ireland's Ambassador to the African Union, that paid a visit to Sudan earlier this year and met with a cross-section of women peace-builders, legislators and IDPs. The delegation's report noted the determination of women to play a full role in conflict prevention efforts and recommended that international organisations take on more responsibility for implementing women, peace and security priorities.
  • Country

    Kyrgyzstan
  • Extracts

    Following the inter-ethnic conflict in southern Kyrgyzstan in 2010, special importance was given to supporting female initiatives in the area of conflict resolution, peacebuilding and post-conflict reconstruction. In that difficult time, women activists joined together to form women's peacekeeping networks in order to put an end to conflict and violence and to prevent a recurrence of the tragic events.

    My country notes the timely and swift reaction of the United Nations Peacebuilding Fund, which funded projects to promote national reconciliation and post- conflict reconstruction. Today, the women's peacekeeping network includes 20 local women's peace committees and serves as the link between local communities and the central Government.
    Kyrgyzstan believes that the key role in coordinating agreed measures on women's participation in conflict prevention and peacebuilding efforts should be played by the new entity UN-Women. Through close partnerships with UN-Women, UNICEF, the United Nations Development Programme and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, in May the network of Kyrgyzstan women peacekeepers began to implement 11 projects aimed at fostering inter-ethnic harmony and ensuring peace in post-conflict areas of Kyrgyzstan. We also consider it necessary to more actively promote that component in the action strategy of the United Nations Regional Centre for Preventive Diplomacy for Central Asia.
  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    We commend you, Madam President, on your concept note (S/2011/654, annex) focusing on the role of women in conflict prevention and mediation.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    Luxembourg continues to place great importance on the plight of women in crisis situations and on mainstreaming the gender dimension into the work of international and regional organizations in that respect. Last December, Luxembourg decided to fund a major project of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations that is aimed at strengthening women's leadership and participation in political life and in peacebuilding activities in countries emerging from conflict. With our support, concrete results are being achieved in three countries — Timor-Leste, Haiti and the Democratic Republic of the Congo — through partnerships forged between national and local authorities and United Nations missions and agencies. We are determined to maintain and to reinforce that national commitment. By strengthening the role of women in conflict prevention and mediation, we will help to improve society as a whole.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    We must expand the role of women everywhere. We need women to play a greater role in preventive diplomacy, mediation and peacekeeping. We need women to play a greater role in post-conflict reconstruction and institution-building, and we need a greater role for women in sustainable development and as agents for social transformation. The integral link between peace, security, gender equality and development is evident. This interaction renders women's participation in peace processes and sustainable development mutually reinforcing. The issue of women's security should therefore be addressed through holistic methodologies rather than ad hoc solutions. In that regard, while we should put gender equality and the empowerment of women at the core of our efforts, we should further encourage and support their participation in the work of peace, including post-conflict recovery efforts and the sustainable development process.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    For a start, I would like to emphasize that women's security is part of overall peace and security and that women can contribute to peace processes and are very able to do so. The involvement of women in peacekeeping operations and conflict prevention is of the utmost importance to ensure the success of the operations, as it is the only way to reach the whole population.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    We welcome the fact that the General Assembly's very first resolution on mediation, which was adopted this June, underlined the importance of the participation of women and the provision of gender expertise in mediation.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    In order to prevent the recurrence of conflict and sustain long-standing peace, the needs of women and girls must be fully addressed in post-conflict peacebuilding. To that end, it is essential that women's full and effective participation be ensured from the very beginning of conflict prevention and mediation processes.

  • Country

    S. Korea
  • Extracts

    Secondly, women's participation at all stages of the peace process needs to be enhanced. The exclusion of women and the lack of gender expertise in negotiations may lead to irreversible setbacks for women's rights, leaving crucial issues such women's engagement in post-conflict governance neglected in peace accords. Efforts to increase women's participation in decision-making bodies need to be sustained.

  • Country

    Senegal
  • Extracts

    While welcoming the zero tolerance policy on sexual violence of the Secretary-General, we must, in addition, insist on the need to bolster the role of women in conflict-prevention and resolution. Nevertheless, the poor results in that area have undoubtedly been due to the continuing low participation of women in the drafting of implementation strategies. I consider it crucial, therefore, to foster women's participation by reserving a key role for them in conflict-prevention policies, as well as policies on peacekeeping, peacebuilding and social and economic recovery. In that context, there must be a special focus on women's empowerment, which will require significant investment in education, training and maternal health.

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    Our country welcomes the report of the Secretary- General (S/2011/598*), which comprehensively reflects the important role that women play in preventive diplomacy, peace negotiation processes, and post-conflict reconstruction. The merit of resolution 1325 (2000) is specifically that the Security Council recognizes therein the key role that women can play as protagonists in peace processes. The international community must pool its efforts to ensure that this protagonist role remains possible. We are convinced that lasting peace can be attained only if women participate in all phases of peace processes. We therefore welcome the idea of compiling lists of women candidates to mediate conflicts.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    One year ago this month, Canada announced its Action Plan which seeks to enhance the participation of women in peace processes. We encourage the meaningful participation of women in all elements of peacemaking. We also promote efforts to protect the human rights and physical safety of women and girls, including against rape as a weapon of war and all forms of sexual violence in conflict.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    During his recent visit to Tripoli, Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs the Honourable John Baird met with Libyan women's groups to discuss the important role that women's leadership will play in the new Libya and its democratic institutions. The Minister urged the new government of Libya to ensure the participation of women in decision-making during Libya's transition. Libya is an example of an environment in which barriers to women's access to peace processes and to reconstruction efforts will need to be addressed by all those involved.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    we encourage the Security Council to continue to provide the political leadership and take targeted actions to ensure the meaningful participation of women in conflict prevention, mediation and resolution processes.

    In order to inform the work of the Council, we recommend that the Council receive regular briefings on these matters by the Secretary-General and other relevant officials including the Special Representative of the Secretary General for Sexual Violence in Armed Conflict.
  • Country

    Israel
  • Extracts

    We must recognize the clear connection between advancing peace and advancing equal rights for women.

  • Country

    Nepal
  • Extracts

    Resolution 1325 (2000) brought to the fore the importance of women as peacemakers and peacebuilders. The resolution was a historic shift from the traditional perspective, which saw women as passive recipients of the suffering produced by conflict. It rightly stressed the role of women as active participants with important and indispensable parts to play in peacemaking and peacebuilding. The resolution rightly urged Member States to mainstream the gender perspective by ensuring an increased representation of women at all decision-making levels in the areas of the prevention, management and resolution of conflict, post-conflict reconstruction and institution-building. On the eleventh anniversary of the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), it is high time to take stock of our achievements, identify challenges and share experiences of successes and difficulties to ensure an enhanced level of effort and support for the effective implementation of the resolution. There have been many notable efforts in a broad range of areas by Member States, the United Nations system, and civil society organizations towards the resolution's implementation. Yet there are areas where our concerted efforts are needed. Countries emerging from conflict are in need of genuine partnership and cooperation from the international community to fill the gaps in the financial resources and human and technical expertise needed to rebuild their societies. The lofty goals and vision of resolution 1325 (2000) will remain unfulfilled if countries coming out of conflict are left without adequate financial and human resources and capacity-building.

Protection
  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    There can be no doubt that the establishment of UN-Women constitutes a milestone in the defence of the rights and the protection of women. In June, Under-Secretary-General achelet submitted to Member States a first strategic plan, which my country fully supports.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    Eleven years after the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), the Council has continued to make progress in providing guidelines on strengthening the protection of women in situations of armed conflict. To that end, in 2008, the Council adopted resolution 1820 (2008), which noted that attacks on women in armed conflicts continued to occur. On 16 December 2010, the Council adopted resolution 1960 (2010). One important aspect that has been highlighted is the need for increased participation by women in political processes, particularly in mediation and in peacekeeping and peacebuilding operations. In that respect, the meeting organized by UN-Women in the context of the sixty sixth session of the General Assembly on women and political participation takes on particular importance. My delegation feels that the meeting should be replicated at the regional, national and local levels.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    Although women are widely recognized as effective agents of peace, they still have little access to decision-making positions and peace negotiations. Women in the aftermath of conflict have little or no protection or access to services, justice and economic security, and those are the areas in which women's needs and gaps in response are most evident. Furthermore, the inclusion of women and gender expertise in peacebuilding activities is essential to reconstituting political, legal, cultural and socio- economic and social structures. Gender equality brings new degrees of democratic inclusiveness to peacebuilding, faster and more durable economic growth, and human and social capital recovery.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    Peru believes that the high-level review of the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) proposed for 2015 will be an opportunity to comprehensively review the progress made by the United Nations system and by Member States in the priority areas of prevention, participation, protection, relief and recovery, as well as on the recommendations put forward by the Secretary-General or by a working group established to implement the resolution.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    The plan is also designed to improve pre-deployment training, with particular emphasis on special measures aimed at protecting women against all forms of violence against them.

  • Country

    Bangladesh
  • Extracts

    We are well aware that poverty, the struggle for scarce resources, and socio-economic injustice and unfairness lie at the heart of conflicts, and that all of them sadly create breeding grounds for social blights, including violence against women and girls. The resulting impact not only leads to insecurity for women and girls, but also impairs political and economic stability, as well as national security. Therefore, protecting women's rights is not an option, but an obligation that requires coordinated action from all of us.

  • Country

    Kenya
  • Extracts

    The Security Council has an important role to play in dealing with peace and security matters internationally. States, however, bear the primary responsibility to protect their citizens from violence. It is in this regard that my delegation calls for more concerted efforts by the international community and the United Nations system to support national efforts to prevent and address the myriad issues surrounding conflicts. Indeed, countries in conflict and those recently emerging from conflict have unique challenges that, if not comprehensively addressed, will lead to either a continuation or a relapse into conflict.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    The flagship agency on gender — UN-Women — has begun to prove its leadership in theimplementation of resolution 1325 (2000) through United Nations system-wide coherence. It has been able to pulled together a set of key universal and regional human rights instruments. The focus on women and peace and security can be further strengthenedthrough collaboration with humanitarian, human rights and aid- to-development agencies, and the defence forces of concerned United Nations Member States, as well as with all categories of women, including activists, war victims, refugees, asylum-seekers and migrants. To conclude, we must go forward to strengthen resolution 1325 (2000), structured on the three main pillars of participation, protection and prevention, and is a most powerful tool for women's organizing, mobilization and action.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    The Lithuanian National Programme on Equal Opportunities for Women and Men 2010-2014 raised, for the first time, gender issues in the national defence system and included measures for training gender experts who will now prepare Lithuanian personnel in this area for deployment to missions and operations. As announced by Lithuanian President Dalia Grybauskaitė during the General Assembly general debate in September (see A/66/PV.16), Lithuania drew up its first national action plan for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in 2011. We seek through the national action plan to facilitate outreach to our society concerning the aims of the resolution, to promote and protect women's rights, to encourage them to participate in international military and civil operations and missions, to involve more institutions and non-governmental organizations, and to streamline activities at all levels.
  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    The United Kingdom believes that women's inclusion in political settlements and peace processes, the protection of women and girls in situations of armed violence, and women's access to security and justice, are essential building blocks for more peaceful and stable societies. In a year when the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to three impressive women, we share the hope of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, that we can together realise the great potential for democracy and peace that women represent.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    Over the past several years, the United Nations and its member states have taken important steps to increase women's participation in issues related to peace and security. We established UN Women and the Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary General for Sexual Violence in Conflict. Through this Council's work, we defined what we expect of parties to conflict with respect to the protection of women. We established a framework to track implementation of Resolution 1325. Many states, including my country, are developing national action plans to guide their engagement on issues of women, peace, and security. But all this is just a beginning. We must ensure that norms and institutional frameworks turn into action. What counts now is implementation and delivering results.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    More can be done to ensure that personnel of UN missions are adequately prepared to implement resolution 1325 and supported in their efforts. Both pre-deployment training and mission-wide strategies on the protection of civilians, including the needs of vulnerable groups such as women and girls, need to be improved. Gaps also remain in ensuring that those serving in UN missions are held accountable for their performance, particularly in the case of sexual exploitation and abuse. As the Secretary-General acknowledged, "the UN still lacks a system that enables complaints of sexual exploitation and abuse to be reported safely." The United Nations needs to lead by example by actively enforcing the zero tolerance policy on sexual exploitation and abuse by UN peacekeepers. Conflict-related sexual violence must be addressed from the very start in peace processes, and more women should be included as mediators and members of negotiating teams.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    In the Participation Pillar, the U.S. supported Afghan women's inclusion in the High Peace Council and in follow-on shuras and negotiations, in the reintegration and reconciliation process at the local level. We've also awarded $16.9 million in direct grants to Afghan women-focused NGOs. In the Protection Pillar, the U.S. contributed roughly $2 million to the office of the Special Representative of the Secretary General for sexual violence and conflict. We have provided numerous courses to foreign militaries on human rights, prevention of gender-based violence, sexual exploitation, and protection of civilians.

  • Country

    Burundi
  • Extracts

    In the area of prevention and protection, the Government of Burundi has taken stern measures to discourage abuse of girls as wives or sex slaves, by instituting a police unit for minors and morality under the ministry that handles public security. As part of the fight against gender-based violence, training sessions are regularly conducted for the military and the national police forces. On top of everything else, a national strategy to fight gender-based violence has been drawn up and will soon be adopted by the Government. The implementation of that strategy will, however, require strong support from the international community.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    The promotion of women's participation in peacekeeping and peacebuilding is key to the protection and empowerment of women. The strengthening of gender expertise and perspectives in peacekeeping activities and increasing the number of female peacekeepers remain a challenge. In that regard, Japan deployed a female military liaison officer to the United Nations Integrated Mission in Timor-Leste this year. We also provide gender training to Japanese personnel before they are deployed to peacekeeping operations. This year, through the United Nations Development Programme, Japan is supporting a project to promote the employment of female police officers and their training in Afghanistan, which so far has resulted in the employment of more than 1,200 Afghan women in local police forces.

  • Country

    S. Korea
  • Extracts

    Thirdly, we need to pay greater attention to the vulnerability of displaced women and girls, given their particular risk of sexual and gender-based violence. My delegation welcomes the target set out in the strategic results framework on the special measures to increase the security of female refugees and persons internally displaced by armed conflict, as well as to ensure multi-sectoral prevention and response mechanisms for sexual and gender-based violence in camp and non-camp settings alike.

  • Country

    Senegal
  • Extracts

    My delegation has a special interest in the topic, because resolution 1325 (2000) represented an enormous step forward in the protection of women and highlighted the importance of their role in all aspects of United Nations peacekeeping. Nonetheless, while it has remained far from being a cure-all, resolution 1325 (2000) has contributed, along with resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009) and 1889 (2009), to improving the normative framework for preventing gender-based violence and for protecting women against that scourge. It should, however, be pointed out that, despite those praiseworthy efforts, persistent shortcomings have exposed thousands of women and girls to various types of barbaric abuse and atrocities. In fact, rape continues to be used as a weapon of war in certain conflict areas, and the ongoing existence of sexual and gender-based violence, even at the end of a conflict, represents an almost permanent threat to the security and health of that vulnerable group of the population. That is why the international community must firmly commit to vigorously combating impunity in order to guarantee the effective prevention of all forms of violence against women.

  • Country

    Senegal
  • Extracts

    My country has allocated a significant part of its budget to education and health, and on 14 May 2010, it adopted a law to establish full parity in all partially or fully elected bodies. In that manner, Senegal intends to ensure the effective participation of women in decision-making processes. To follow up on that law, a national gender-parity monitoring body was set up and will be officially inaugurated on 16 November. Senegal has already adopted its national action plan to implement resolution 1325 (2000). Furthermore, it has sought to make a positive contribution to drafting the action plan of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and the Dakar Declaration by focusing on the four following areas: first, effective participation of women in the peace process; secondly, protection of women and girls; thirdly, prevention of gender-based violence through preventive diplomacy and early warning systems, and fourthly, reconstruction and victim assistance.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    One year ago this month, Canada announced its Action Plan which seeks to enhance the participation of women in peace processes. We encourage the meaningful participation of women in all elements of peacemaking. We also promote efforts to protect the human rights and physical safety of women and girls, including against rape as a weapon of war and all forms of sexual violence in conflict.

  • Country

    Nepal
  • Extracts

    We are ready and eager to collaborate with the international community for effective implementation of our national action plan. As enshrined in Nepal's Interim Constitution, one third of Parliament is represented by women. This political representation will be continued down to village-level elected bodies. Local peace committees are functioning in all districts with at least 33 per cent of participation of women, and are empowered to address post-conflict-related issues at the local level. Nepal has been implementing gender-based budgeting for some years, through which gender mainstreaming gets special attention in all development activities. We have introduced a policy of affirmative action in various areas, including the civil service, with a view to ensuring that women are placed at public sector decision-making levels. We are also committed to increasing the number of women in our army and police forces.

  • Country

    Maldives
  • Extracts

    Research by the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security reveals that the Council does not consistently apply the principles of the women, peace and security agenda in its country-specific work.

  • Country

    Maldives
  • Extracts

    It was democracy that turned the tide of abuse in the Maldives. Government-led efforts to address issues related to women resulted in the establishment of call centres and protective services. Civil society participation and its advocacy in such efforts have also been instrumental. In addition, the current Government has taken steps towards training policemen and policewomen to respond effectively to domestic violence and abuse, while encouraging a greater participation of women in political life.

Sexual and Gender-Based Violence
  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    Colombia appreciates the important role that is given in this report to promoting cooperation mechanisms, constructive dialogue and effective support for efforts being made in different countries, as well as the contributions from the General Assembly aimed at strengthening the national capacities of States in preventing and addressing all forms of violence against women.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    The appointment of Ms. Margot Wallström as Special Representative of the SecretaryGeneral on Sexual Violence in Conflict has contributed to monitoring the implementation of respective resolutions within their scope of competence as established by the Security Council.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    I would like to highlight the fact that the report of the Secretary-General notes progress made in Colombia in connection with the four aspects of resolution 1325 (2000), namely, prevention, participation, protection and relief and recovery. I think that it is also important to highlight other important actions that are being pursued in these areas in my country on the basis of our conviction that the phenomenon of violence against women includes domestic violence, violence committed in the context of the community and violence caused by illegal armed groups.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    In terms of prevention, Colombia's armed forces have incorporated into their training programmes courses in the prevention of gender-based violence, sexual violence, sexual and reproductive health, sexual and reproductive rights and gender equality.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    Our priority is the incorporation of gender perspectives into our major national policies, including development plans, strategies for poverty eradication and the promotion of employment and entrepreneurial culture, among others. We place particular emphasis on action related to protecting women against all forms of violence, as well as for protecting those in particularly vulnerable situations, such as indigenous women, migrant women, trafficked women and girls, and women in rural areas, among others.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Conflict and post-conflict situations often bring violence and deprivation of rights. Addressing conflict related or sexual and gender-based violence, and combating various abuses of women and girls' rights, is an integral part of the women and peace and security agenda. In that context, we emphasize the importance of bringing those responsible for crimes against women and girls to justice. A range of existing legal and reconciliation mechanisms should be used at the national or international level, while support for national institutions and institutional reforms must be an integral part of this process.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The appointments of a Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict and a number of women special envoys are also positive developments. It is important that special representatives work in a coordinated manner among themselves and with other United Nations bodies. That is not only to ensure optimal utilization of resources and avoidance of duplication but also to promote greater coherence.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The promotion and protection of the human rights of women and girls in armed conflict continue to pose a pressing challenge. The Council has in previous resolutions recognized the specific vulnerability of women during conflicts and that they bear a disproportionate brunt of armed conflict, even though they are in most cases not directly engaged in combat. There should be zero tolerance for gender-based violence, and incidents of gender-based violence must be unequivocally condemned. All cases of gender based violence in an armed conflict, whether perpetrated by parties to the conflict, peacekeeping personnel or humanitarian actors, must be promptly investigated and the perpetrators prosecuted.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    Women and girls are much more vulnerable to the impacts of violent conflict than men, due to the breakdown of social and legal systems when violence occurs and because of inherent gender inequalities. Women frequently bear the brunt of the devastating consequences of armed violence, including sexual violence.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    Secondly, we are pleased to report a clear increase in the number of women among the military, police and civilian peacekeepers deployed. We also committed to train our personnel on gender equality and human rights. The mixed police teams deployed in Haiti, Liberia and Afghanistan have all received training on resolution 1325 (2000). Some have been specifically trained to address sexual and gender-based violence. We have developed a human rights manual for all crisis management personnel and supported gender-sensitive security sector reform in Palestine and the Balkans.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    Thirdly, we have increased our efforts to fight impunity, with due attention to the rights of victims. Justice, including meaningful reparations for victims, is essential in restoring the confidence of the people in their Government. There should never be amnesty for the most serious crimes, including sexual violence, which can constitute war crimes and crimes against humanity. We remain staunch supporters of the International Criminal Court and have been at the forefront of the work linking its complementarity principle with development activities that strengthen rule of law at the national level. We have also led the discussions around the review of the Court's strategy for victims, and we support its Trust Fund for Victims.
  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    In light of the persistent realities in conflict situations, especially the continuing violence against women, we need a renewed commitment on the part of all actors, first and foremost States, but also regional governmental institutions and civil society organizations. We must be more vigilant about putting into practice the relevant recommendations in the Council resolutions. We must also be more mindful of the Secretary-General's recommendations aimed at greater integration of women in prevention, mediation and peacebuilding in postconflict situations

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    Last, it is high time we fully mainstream Resolution 1325 into the work of the Security Council. The Council should ensure that resolutions, including mission mandates and renewals, consistently integrate and substantively advance the “Women and Peace and Security” agenda. The Security Council should also benefit more regularly and frequently from briefings by the Executive Director of UN Women and relevant Special Representatives of the Secretary-General.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    The Republic of Croatia welcomes the latest report of the Secretary-General on the implementation of that resolution (S/2011/598*), the recommendations contained therein and the presidential statement adopted by the Council today (S/PRST/2011/20). Furthermore, Croatia commends the roles of and work done by both the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, Ms. Wallström, and the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict, Ms. Coomaraswamy.

  • Speaker

    The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)
  • Extracts

    First, discriminatory attitudes and gender stereotypes, including in the education sector, must be ended. This implies a strong advocacy role by the United Nations for women's human rights and the elaboration of media strategies and tools for outreach, in particular when these rights are violated or threatened to be violated. Secondly, all forms of discrimination and violence against women and girls must be ended. The United Nations system is called upon to develop a more coherent response to this phenomenon, including through the Secretary-General's campaign on violence against women. Special attention should also be paid to the recognition that sexual violence can be both a cause and a consequence of HIV/AIDS, as shown in conflict settings where both are endemic.

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    On the subject of United Nations coherence and effectiveness in particular, we recognize the important and central role of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-Women), working in close partnership and collaboration with the Special Representatives of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict and for Children and Armed Conflict, respectively.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    In that context, my delegation would like to point out that my country is a contributor of military observers. I am pleased to announce that, this November, Peru will deploy women on the ground in peacekeeping operations. We have already said repeatedly that we should never allow sexual violence to be seen as the inevitable consequence of armed conflict. We therefore welcome the zero-tolerance policy on sexual violence and abuse that the SecretaryGeneral has been introducing into peacekeeping operations. We also believe that training and consciousness raising for military personnel deployed on the ground are fundamental to enable them to respond in a timely and appropriate fashion when faced with situations of sexual violence.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    Because combating the impunity of gender violence is fundamental to peacekeeping processes, States need to strengthen their judicial systems so that such cases can be brought to trial. In that regard, it will continue to be equally important to pursue the ratification of the Statute of the International Criminal Court.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    My country resolutely supports the work currently being carried out by UN-Women and encourages it to continue its decisive contribution to the implementation of resolutions relating to peace and security, as well as to follow-up with regard to the indicators that the Secretary-General presented in October 2010. Similarly, my country values the work of the Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict and the Special Representative on Children and Armed Conflict on aspects related to women, peace and security, in particular with respect to the prevention of sexual violence.

  • Country

    Sudan
  • Extracts

    Concerning the issue of violence against women, the Government of the Sudan in 2007 adopted a national strategy elaborated at both the official and the popular levels. The strategy includes six principles on strengthening and revitalizing the participation of women in the maintenance of peace, and on their right to participate in terms of decision-making, economic development, education, health, the environment and the settlement of disputes. The strategy has been implemented at both the federal and the state level. In that respect, the priorities included in paragraph 3 of the report of the Security Council are almost identical to the criteria included in our national strategy.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    It is also important to recognize that there is now great awareness of the many types of violence inflicted on women in conflict, and that significant attempts have been made to address them. Since the primary victims of armed conflict are women, along with children and the elderly, it is important that they take on a key role in peacekeeping and peacebuilding and, even more urgently, in the process of prevention, to which it is never too late to devote special attention.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    National ownership of resolution 1325 (2000) is the best way to ensure its effective implementation, given that primary responsibility for combating rape as a weapon of war falls to Member States, whose duty it is to urgently take measures to deal with this phenomenon, measures that educate as well as enforce. Tunisia has already launched a national action plan for implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). In particular, it promotes training women in peacekeeping and peacebuilding so that we can deploy qualified personnel in United Nations operations on the ground.

  • Country

    Bangladesh
  • Extracts

    Eleven years ago, the Security Council adopted the landmark resolution 1325 (2000) on women and peace and security. Thereafter, several resolutions, such as resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010), have been adopted to buttress the process initiated in resolution 1325 (2000). We are, however, disappointed to note that violence against women and girls continues, as detailed in various reports. As we have mentioned in the past, women and girls suffer most as victims of conflict, while in the peace process they are mostly deprived of the dividends. Therefore, the onus lies on us to ensure that the oppression of women and girls, particularly that based on gender, is stopped forever.

  • Country

    Bangladesh
  • Extracts

    The Government has enacted laws to protect women against domestic violence and is currently implementing a number of projects to develop the capabilities of women. Many affirmative actions have been taken that help women in distress and elderly women. In order to involve women in decision-making processes, the Government has adopted a quota system for women in the national Parliament and in the recruitment of our civil service officers, in addition to direct elections and open competitions.

  • Country

    Bangladesh
  • Extracts

    In the maintenance of international peace and security, we take pride in our modest contribution of troops and police forces to United Nations peacekeeping missions. The recruitment of women to the police forces and the military amply demonstrates our commitment to women's empowerment in both the national and the international arenas. We are pleased that we were able to deploy a full contingent — an all- female formed police unit — to the friendly country of Haiti following the devastating earthquake there. I am pleased to report that our all-male troop contingents are fully briefed on gender issues. We provide the necessary on-the-job training to reinforce their understanding and sensitivity in that regard. We are aware that we need to mainstream a gender perspective into all conflict prevention activities and strategies, develop effective gender-sensitive early warning mechanisms and institutions and strengthen efforts to prevent violence against women, including various forms of gender-based violence.

  • Country

    Kenya
  • Extracts

    Prevention is undoubtedly the cornerstone of any strategy to address the challenges that society faces. We note with satisfaction the various actions that have been undertaken by Member States, the United Nations system, civil society and other actors in implementing resolution 1325 (2000). We believe that countries must systematically integrate and mainstream women- specific issues in their action plans in order to tackle the growing problem of sexual and gender-based violence during conflict and even in peacetime. In this regard, it is important that more support be extended to countries in order to buttress preventive measures and support their institutions to combat these vices.

  • Country

    Kenya
  • Extracts

    Sexual abuse is indeed one of the most pervasive crimes of our time. It is imperative, therefore, that the international community support national systems and institutions — such as the police, prosecution and the judiciary — to combat this despicable crime. My delegation wishes to underscore the importance of education and communication as tools to prevent and combat violence generally. It is in this connection that my delegation urges UN-Women to continue prioritizing education and public communication within its mandate.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    More than a decade has passed since the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000). Throughout that period, the United Nations system, regional organizations, Member States and civil society have made significant efforts to adapt the resolution to local settings through a wide spectrum of measures and initiatives. Progress has been made in terms of discourse and evolving practice on the participation of women in conflict prevention, resolution and peacebuilding, and awareness has increased of the threat that sexual violence constitutes to peace and security.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    Despite important national, regional and international efforts, however, the conditions that women and girls still face in situations of armed conflict continue to be abhorrent. The benefits of resolution 1325 (2000) have yet to reach most women in conflict and in fragile settings. In that regard, allow me to make the following comments. First, we view the prevention of conflict as a crucial element of resolution 1325 (2000). That includes the prevention of all forms of conflict-related violence against women and girls. Sexual violence remains the least-condemned war crime in peace agreements and beyond. The elimination of impunity is perhaps the single most effective preventive tool to fight that crime. In that regard, reforming the security sector and ensuring respect for the rule of law in a gender-responsive manner is of crucial importance. Conflict and post-conflict societies should be assisted in those areas as early as possible. The preventive aspect of resolution 1325 (2000) also includes women's full and equal involvement in conflict prevention efforts. We concur with the Secretary-General's report (S/2011/598*) that more attention needs to be paid to women's roles in the field. We support his recommendation for the Council to use its deliberations on preventive diplomacy and mediation to consider means of enhancing the role of women in conflict prevention.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    Today, women's community peace huts in counties around the country are venues for conflict mediation and resolution. They also serve as safe havens for women escaping domestic violence and as counselling centres for survivors of sexual and gender- based violence. In the peace huts, women address child support issues and work with local police to identify suspects who have committed crimes against women, so as to ensure their arrest and interrogation. Women also monitor the early warning signs of conflict and lead peaceful demonstrations on issues that affect their well-being.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    The incidence of rape of girls and women is still unacceptable high, and women constitute only 14 per cent of the Liberian legislature. We are humbled when we consider the vastness of the challenges that still lie ahead; the gender inequities that still exist; and the high walls that we still have to scale before female mediators and peace negotiators become normal features of the international peace architecture. We believe that the systematic use of quotas at the national and international levels could help to accelerate progress towards this objective. Affirmative action programmes are also required to give the necessary impetus to our effort to place women centrally in conflict prevention, mediation and peace processes.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    We welcome in particular the establishment of UN-Women, the agency that lies at the heart of the gender architecture of the Organization, as it coordinates all efforts undertaken in this field. We welcome also the inclusion of specific indicators in the reports of the Secretary-General, as is the case in the report before us today (S/2011/598*), as well as the seven-point action plan. Unfortunately, however, as a result of the unequal implementation of resolutions dealing with the gender architecture, there exist significant gaps. One of the clearest examples of this is the persistence of sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict situations.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    My delegation is concerned about the identification of patterns of sexual violence in conflict and postconflict situations in many States and regions. Sexual violence as a tactic of war stokes crises, fuels the continuation of armed conflict, promotes the displacement of people, limits subsistence activities and reduces opportunities for development. In order to avert that phenomenon, it is pivotal that peacekeeping mission personnel as well as mediation and electoral assistance teams have sufficient specialized expertise in the field of gender and sexual violence and also have the capacity to act in a timely manner so as to initiate the relevant investigations.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    We have also made strides in ensuring the rule of law, most recently the establishment of a national commission on the elimination of violence against women, following the enactment of the law in that
    regard in December 2010. Those steps have been vital in enhancing Afghan women's access to legal redress and have also sent a strong message that the Afghanistan Government is committed to the rights of women and to ensuring that there is no impunity for those who violate them.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    Our international partners have assisted the Afghan Government in our endeavours. UN-Women has administered a multi-donor trust fund for the elimination of violence against women that provided grants for national organizations to combat violence against women. I am very pleased to report that, in collaboration with UN-Women, Afghanistan has submitted its first country report on the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. The continued collaboration of our Government, international partners and both Afghan and international civil society groups will be vital to ensure the full realization of women's rights in a strong and stable Afghanistan.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    Building a stable and secure environment that enables women to live free of intimidation and violence and promotes their participation and leadership in efforts to maintain peace and security is one of the core objectives of the Afghan Government.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    We have seen progress in this regard in the past 10 years. To complement the resolution, the Council has put in place a framework that makes possible a more comprehensive approach to the protection of women and their participation in the resolution of conflicts. At the same time, the United Nations Secretariat and its agencies, funds and programmes, as well as other bodies of the Organization, now undertake more coordinated efforts. Ms. Bachelet's role has undoubtedly made a contribution in that regard. I also wish to commend the work and coordinating efforts of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, as well as his Special Representative on Children and Armed conflict for her respective contributions.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    The prevention of the violation of women and girls' human rights, including sexual violence, must enjoy the highest priority. It is high time that we bring war criminals to justice, end impunity for their atrocities, and invest in immediate service and assistance mechanisms for women and girl war crime victims. Our focus must also be on including women in peace processes as mediators, members of negotiating parties, and signatories to peace agreements.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    Kazakhstan welcomes the drafting of a comprehensive set of indicators aimed at tracking implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), which can serve as benchmarks for standards to design and set in place a methodical monitoring system allowing countries to review their own structures and mechanisms and resource allocations. We must also condemn rape as a tactic of terror and war.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    Liechtenstein honours its commitments to implementing resolution 1325 (2000), as pledged at the commitment conference “A call to action” on 25 September 2010. We continue to support international efforts to end impunity for the most serious crimes, including those committed against women during armed conflict. That commitment includes continued financial support to the Trust Fund for Victims established by the International Criminal Court (ICC), which adopts a gender-based perspective across all programming and specifically targets victims of all forms of sexual and gender violence.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    The Rome Statute of the ICC has significantly advanced international law by including sexual violence in the definition of crimes, in particular as a crime against humanity. The ICC therefore represents an important mechanism in the fight against sexual violence, which should be better integrated in the Security Council work on the issue.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    The Rome Statute of the ICC has significantly advanced international law by including sexual violence in the definition of crimes, in particular as a crime against humanity. The ICC therefore represents an important mechanism in the fight against sexual violence, which should be better integrated in the Security Council work on the issue.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    The improvement of the status of women, in particular in countries with identified patterns of conflictrelated sexual violence, starts with addressing the very basic issues involved in enabling women to live a more decent life. The experience of Lithuania and other partner countries in Afghanistan, where Lithuania is leading a provincial reconstruction team, shows that women's empowerment and full participation at all levels of economic, political and social life are key not only to peace and security but also to poverty reduction, economic recovery and sustainable development. To cite but two examples, one project aims at consulting local medics and patients on midwifery and other women's health- related questions at the provincial hospital. Another important development project for local women and their organizations was dedicated to strengthening the capacity of the provincial administration and local non-governmental organizations to prepare and implement their own projects. Finally, Lithuania calls on the Security Council to use its authority to ensure that all resolutions, including those on mission mandates and their renewal, integrate and advance the women and peace and security agenda.

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    In terms of the Security Council's Charter-based functions, its attention should be given only to those situations that represent a threat to international peace and security. Issues ofviolence against women should be considered in the Council only as they relate to themes of maintaining peace and security and in strict relation to those situations that are on the Council's agenda. We are convinced that that will guarantee the effective work of the Council to implement resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    We have carefully studied the report of the Secretary-General (S/2011/598*) prepared for this meeting. We suggest that it would be proper to ensure that future reports reflect the multifaceted nature of violence against women, as is required by resolution 1325 (2000) itself. In particular, we call on the Secretary-General to give more attention to such important problems as killing and wounding of women and children, particularly as a result of indiscriminate or excessive use of force. Often such crimes go unpunished or are justified as being unavoidable or being so-called collateral damage. This contradicts provisions of the Geneva Convention, inter alia. The recent events in Libya are an example of this.

  • Country

    Ukraine
  • Extracts

    Despite all international efforts, women and girls continue to be the most vulnerable victims of armed conflicts, targeted with sexual violence, sexual exploitation and other forms of gender-based violence. Eliminating impunity is critical for preventing gender- based crimes. In 2010 Ukraine became a co-sponsor of Council resolution 1960 (2010), which concerned sexual violence in armed conflict. We remain ready to undertake further steps, in particular as a member of UN-Women.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    I have three points to make in today's debate: first, support for the role of UN Women and Special Representatives of the Secretary General (SRSG) on Sexual Violence in Conflict; second, the need to do more on conflict prevention and early warning; and finally, the work that the United Kingdom has taken forward through our National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    Since taking up her position as Under Secretary General and Executive Director of UN Women, Michelle Bachelet has passionately and effectively promoted the Women, Peace and Security agenda. Supported by Special Representatives Radhika Coomaraswamy and Margot Wallstrom, UN Women plays a vital role coordinating wider international efforts to implement the full suite of UN resolutions on Women Peace and Security. We commend, in particular, the efforts to improve systematic reporting of progress through the development of indicators and a strategic framework, including the Strategic Framework of UN Action against Sexual Violence in Conflict. In July, the United Kingdom pledged $16 million over a 2 year period to UN Women to support this important work.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    In Afghanistan, the UK has funded a full range of measures undertaken by the Criminal Justice Task Force to minimise gender-related barriers to working in a high profile law enforcement environment. And we supported the Government of Nepal's efforts to develop its own National Action Plan to generate, among many other things, work to provide support for women and girls who have been the victims of sexual violence. We encourage more countries to develop National Action Plans in order to strengthen the implementation of Resolution 1325 and associated resolutions.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    Over the past several years, the United Nations and its member states have taken important steps to increase women's participation in issues related to peace and security. We established UN Women and the Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary General for Sexual Violence in Conflict. Through this Council's work, we defined what we expect of parties to conflict with respect to the protection of women. We established a framework to track implementation of Resolution 1325. Many states, including my country, are developing national action plans to guide their engagement on issues of women, peace, and security. But all this is just a beginning. We must ensure that norms and institutional frameworks turn into action. What counts now is implementation and delivering results.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    More can be done to ensure that personnel of UN missions are adequately prepared to implement resolution 1325 and supported in their efforts. Both pre-deployment training and mission-wide strategies on the protection of civilians, including the needs of vulnerable groups such as women and girls, need to be improved. Gaps also remain in ensuring that those serving in UN missions are held accountable for their performance, particularly in the case of sexual exploitation and abuse. As the Secretary-General acknowledged, "the UN still lacks a system that enables complaints of sexual exploitation and abuse to be reported safely." The United Nations needs to lead by example by actively enforcing the zero tolerance policy on sexual exploitation and abuse by UN peacekeepers. Conflict-related sexual violence must be addressed from the very start in peace processes, and more women should be included as mediators and members of negotiating teams.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    In the Participation Pillar, the U.S. supported Afghan women's inclusion in the High Peace Council and in follow-on shuras and negotiations, in the reintegration and reconciliation process at the local level. We've also awarded $16.9 million in direct grants to Afghan women-focused NGOs. In the Protection Pillar, the U.S. contributed roughly $2 million to the office of the Special Representative of the Secretary General for sexual violence and conflict. We have provided numerous courses to foreign militaries on human rights, prevention of gender-based violence, sexual exploitation, and protection of civilians.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    In the Prevention Pillar, the U.S. has developed multiple programs that seek to address the root causes of conflict, including a $26 million annual Reconciliation Program that supports innovative programming in conflict-affected countries and includes gender analysis. In the Relief and Recovery Pillar, the U.S. has provided significant funding to improve water and sanitation in situations in which women's safety and security are at risk.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    The positive ramifications of increasing women's participation in every context and at every stage of political transition are widely recognized and critically important. Situations of political transition should be perceived as providing opportunities for enhancing women's roles in decision-making at every level. It is equally important to redouble our efforts to combat impunity. Unfortunately, armed conflict and post- conflict disorder hit women and children the hardest. Targeted measures should be directed at the perpetrators of sexual violence and rape. We should all ensure that effective international mechanisms are established to respond to such crimes and bring their perpetrators to justice.

  • Country

    Burundi
  • Extracts

    In the area of prevention and protection, the Government of Burundi has taken stern measures to discourage abuse of girls as wives or sex slaves, by instituting a police unit for minors and morality under the ministry that handles public security. As part of the fight against gender-based violence, training sessions are regularly conducted for the military and the national police forces. On top of everything else, a national strategy to fight gender-based violence has been drawn up and will soon be adopted by the Government. The implementation of that strategy will, however, require strong support from the international community.

  • Country

    S. Korea
  • Extracts

    Thirdly, we need to pay greater attention to the vulnerability of displaced women and girls, given their particular risk of sexual and gender-based violence. My delegation welcomes the target set out in the strategic results framework on the special measures to increase the security of female refugees and persons internally displaced by armed conflict, as well as to ensure multi-sectoral prevention and response mechanisms for sexual and gender-based violence in camp and non-camp settings alike.

  • Country

    Senegal
  • Extracts

    My delegation has a special interest in the topic, because resolution 1325 (2000) represented an enormous step forward in the protection of women and highlighted the importance of their role in all aspects of United Nations peacekeeping. Nonetheless, while it has remained far from being a cure-all, resolution 1325 (2000) has contributed, along with resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009) and 1889 (2009), to improving the normative framework for preventing gender-based violence and for protecting women against that scourge. It should, however, be pointed out that, despite those praiseworthy efforts, persistent shortcomings have exposed thousands of women and girls to various types of barbaric abuse and atrocities. In fact, rape continues to be used as a weapon of war in certain conflict areas, and the ongoing existence of sexual and gender-based violence, even at the end of a conflict, represents an almost permanent threat to the security and health of that vulnerable group of the population. That is why the international community must firmly commit to vigorously combating impunity in order to guarantee the effective prevention of all forms of violence against women.

  • Country

    Senegal
  • Extracts

    While welcoming the zero tolerance policy on sexual violence of the Secretary-General, we must, in addition, insist on the need to bolster the role of women in conflict-prevention and resolution. Nevertheless, the poor results in that area have undoubtedly been due to the continuing low participation of women in the drafting of implementation strategies. I consider it crucial, therefore, to foster women's participation by reserving a key role for them in conflict-prevention policies, as well as policies on peacekeeping, peacebuilding and social and economic recovery. In that context, there must be a special focus on women's empowerment, which will require significant investment in education, training and maternal health.

  • Country

    Senegal
  • Extracts

    The effective prevention of sexual violence also requires stringent measures to vigorously combat the root causes of conflict exacerbation. Since there is an established link between what is known as low-level conflicts and wide-scale violence against women, I would like to launch an appeal for coordinated and focused action against the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons. In that regard, my delegation cherishes the hope that the diplomatic conference of 2012 will enable the adoption of a robust arms trade treaty. Allow me to conclude by expressing my country's conviction that the efforts to be undertaken by 2015 will enable the Security Council to take stock at that time of the positive implementation of resolution 1325 (2000).
  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    One year ago this month, Canada announced its Action Plan which seeks to enhance the participation of women in peace processes. We encourage the meaningful participation of women in all elements of peacemaking. We also promote efforts to protect the human rights and physical safety of women and girls, including against rape as a weapon of war and all forms of sexual violence in conflict.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    we encourage the Security Council to continue to provide the political leadership and take targeted actions to ensure the meaningful participation of women in conflict prevention, mediation and resolution processes.

    In order to inform the work of the Council, we recommend that the Council receive regular briefings on these matters by the Secretary-General and other relevant officials including the Special Representative of the Secretary General for Sexual Violence in Armed Conflict.
  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    Canada applauds the Secretary-General's recommendation to develop a framework including early warning signs specific to conflict-related sexual violence.

  • Country

    Maldives
  • Extracts

    Research by the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security reveals that the Council does not consistently apply the principles of the women, peace and security agenda in its country-specific work.

Peacekeeping
  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    All of that reflects the efforts being made by the Government of Colombia to adopt policies designed to include women at all stages of peacekeeping and peacebuilding while eliminating discrimination against women and promoting their economic, political and social empowerment, as well as their more active participation in development, both in decisionmaking and in enjoying the benefits that development brings.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Ensuring that women are represented and participate in decision-making forums, institutions and mechanisms concerned with preventing and resolving conflict and with peacebuilding; that they are included in peace agreement negotiations and implementation; and that enabling conditions for women peacemakers and peacekeepers are created requires clear guidelines and support on the part of the United Nations and national authorities. Member States and regional and sub-regional organizations should invest more in strengthening the capacity of women's organizations. Such organizations should be provided with support for their conflict-prevention and resolution efforts and consulted more on local women's peace initiatives.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The United Nations is being asked to do more with regard to women and peace and security, including through the mainstreaming of the gender perspective in the United Nations system and United Nations peacekeeping missions. We commend the work of the Secretary-General in mainstreaming the gender perspective in the United Nations recruitment process. The number of women at the senior decision-making level and the participation of women in mission planning, peacekeeping operations and peacebuilding efforts have increased. Nonetheless, the numbers still remain very low.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    We agree with all those who support increased deployment of female military and police personnel in United Nations peacekeeping operations and the provision to all military and police personnel of appropriate training to effectively discharge their responsibilities. India was the first country to deploy an all-female peacekeeping unit, 100 troops in Liberia in 2007. We have offered to contribute more such units. India is the largest contributor of troops in United Nations history. We are very proud of the exemplary record of our peacekeepers, both men and women, in the protection of women, children and the needy in conflict situations.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    The adoption of resolution 1325 (2000) was hailed as a landmark and groundbreaking resolution. For the first time, the importance of women's full participation in conflict prevention, conflict resolution and peacebuilding at all levels was recognized. Since then, the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and its sister resolutions have paved the way for the mainstreaming of the gender perspective in United Nations peacekeeping operations and missions worldwide. In a similar vein, the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, which also addresses women and armed conflict, should continue to be implemented. Those various international frameworks on women are complementary and mutually reinforce our efforts to protect the rights of women in conflict situations.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    Our annual debate on women and peace and security is built upon various premises, among them, first, that women in conflict are often victims and shoulder multiple consequences of conflict, and secondly, that despite being vulnerable, in many instances women in conflict have continued to demonstrate their transformative role and their potential for creating sustainable peace. Indonesia shares the common view that through the promotion of women's role as agents of peace, their plight as victims of conflict can be overcome. Embedded in that common view is the paramount importance of conflict prevention.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    In that regard, South Africa is among the States with the highest representation of women across all spheres of Government. Women are also at the helm of ministries in the fields of international relations, cooperation and defence. In the area of peacekeeping, we have deployed gender mainstreaming officers in positions of command in peacekeeping missions to ensure that issues related to women are addressed. In addition, we are one of the top three troop-contributing countries with the largest contingent of women in peacekeeping missions.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    In the recent past, South African women held the position of Deputy Police commissioner in the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur. We believe that the presence of women in peacekeeping missions positively benefits local women and girls, including other vulnerable groups in countries in, and emerging from, conflict.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    Secondly, we are pleased to report a clear increase in the number of women among the military, police and civilian peacekeepers deployed. We also committed to train our personnel on gender equality and human rights. The mixed police teams deployed in Haiti, Liberia and Afghanistan have all received training on resolution 1325 (2000). Some have been specifically trained to address sexual and gender-based violence. We have developed a human rights manual for all crisis management personnel and supported gender-sensitive security sector reform in Palestine and the Balkans.

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    In the matter under discussion, three areas seem to us essential for coherent and fruitful action. First, we must strengthen our normative framework at the international, regional and national levels. Secondly, we must work to strengthen capacities, especially through peacekeeping missions and in the post-conflict peacebuilding and reconstruction phase. Finally, we must establish a stronger link between the protection of women and children and the prevention of armed conflict by focusing on the root causes of those conflicts.

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    We note that much progress has been made in developing a normative framework to strengthen the action of the international community. Resolution 1325 (2000) is the foundation of that structure. That foundation has expanded and now forms a body with resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010). Together, those resolutions offer the Council and the international community as a whole a vast body of values and principles that can guide our action in matters of participation, protection, capacity building and the fight against impunity, but also in the rehabilitation and reintegration of women in society in the context of peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    In December 2010 Italy adopted a three-year action plan on Resolution 1325. The plan provides a strategic framework to improve implementation of 1325 by having a national focal point at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs monitor all relevant activities. The plan focuses on key goals such as: increasing the number of women in the national Police and in the armed Forces; strengthening the inclusion of women in peace operations and in the decision-making bodies of peace operations; protecting the human rights of women and children, in conflict and post-conflict; strengthening women's participation in peace processes; and engaging with civil society organizations to promote the implementation of Resolution 1325.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    Eleven years after the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), the Council has continued to make progress in providing guidelines on strengthening the protection of women in situations of armed conflict. To that end, in 2008, the Council adopted resolution 1820 (2008), which noted that attacks on women in armed conflicts continued to occur. On 16 December 2010, the Council adopted resolution 1960 (2010). One important aspect that has been highlighted is the need for increased participation by women in political processes, particularly in mediation and in peacekeeping and peacebuilding operations. In that respect, the meeting organized by UN-Women in the context of the sixty sixth session of the General Assembly on women and political participation takes on particular importance. My delegation feels that the meeting should be replicated at the regional, national and local levels.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    The implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) is not the exclusive province of the Security Council or of the United Nations system; it is also incumbent upon the international community as a whole. In that respect, the formulation and development of a national action plan is crucial. Chile has had such a plan in place since 2009. By involving a broad swath of civil society in its development, and by incorporating the Secretary-General's earlier recommendations, we designed an integrated action plan that brings together, as effectively as possible, agencies charged with the prevention, management and resolution of conflicts, all with the comprehensive inclusion of a gender perspective.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    The main action lines of that document are to apply a gender focus to the respect and promotion of human rights; to promote the equal participation of women both in peacekeeping operations and in related decision-making bodies; to bring a gender perspective in the broadest sense of the term to bear on the design, implementation and execution of our international cooperation policies; to strengthen the technical capacity of both public officials and civil society with regard to gender issues and security and conflict; and to promote the regional implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) through the exchange of experience and international cooperation, both bilaterally and via the regional peacekeeping operations in which Chile takes part, particularly in the context of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    Croatia's policy in this regard is directed towards the substantial deployment of women in peacekeeping operations, in both the armed forces and police, as their presence reinforces the importance of women's perspective and represents added value for all initiatives aimed at achieving peace.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    Resolution 1325 (2000), adopted 11 years ago, represents a fundamental milestone, because ever since its adoption the issue of the role of women in peace and security has occupied an important place on the agenda of the Security Council. As a result, it has taken on an important and essential role in the achievement of international peace and security. The resolution has served as the point of departure for subsequent developments on this issue in the Security Council when it comes to ensuring the participation of women in peacekeeping and peacebuilding and, most especially, with regard to combating sexual violence against women and girls. For that reason, along with international human rights law and international humanitarian law, resolution 1325 (2000) and resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010) provide the international community with a normative framework for considering the needs of women in conflict and post-conflict situations.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    In that context, my delegation would like to point out that my country is a contributor of military observers. I am pleased to announce that, this November, Peru will deploy women on the ground in peacekeeping operations. We have already said repeatedly that we should never allow sexual violence to be seen as the inevitable consequence of armed conflict. We therefore welcome the zero-tolerance policy on sexual violence and abuse that the SecretaryGeneral has been introducing into peacekeeping operations. We also believe that training and consciousness raising for military personnel deployed on the ground are fundamental to enable them to respond in a timely and appropriate fashion when faced with situations of sexual violence.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    Because combating the impunity of gender violence is fundamental to peacekeeping processes, States need to strengthen their judicial systems so that such cases can be brought to trial. In that regard, it will continue to be equally important to pursue the ratification of the Statute of the International Criminal Court.

  • Country

    Bangladesh
  • Extracts

    We recognize that empowering women will lead to their taking command of resources and acquiring adequate leadership capabilities for the efficient management of those resources. Therefore, we emphasize the fulfilment of women's economic needs and the necessity of their engagement internationally at all levels and in all forms of decision-making.

    While the former could be achieved by ensuring women's access to and participation in income- generating and entrepreneurial activities, such as micro-credit, education, vocational training and public health, the latter could be ensured through the recruitment of women, particularly to senior positions. In order to more clearly understand the needs of the women of the South, we must ensure that women from the global South get due recognition in the consideration of such recruitment. For proper coordination with the field, the fair representation of troop- and police-contributing countries must be ensured, as decided previously by the General Assembly and the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations of the United Nations. We believe that women's participation can be ensured through an inclusive process. At the policy level, this requires the creation of a mechanism to integrate women into decision-making processes, which should be supported by the necessary capacity- building initiatives at the community level that would enable women to effectively participate. We strongly believe that our debates and discussions, instead of being confined to our respective capitals, should transcend borders and reach women at the grass-roots level, women who may sometimes be unable even to find the words to express their agony. This has to be done by empowering the people, especially women, at the grass-roots level. If we fail to do so, our progress will be slow.
  • Country

    Bangladesh
  • Extracts

    In the maintenance of international peace and security, we take pride in our modest contribution of troops and police forces to United Nations peacekeeping missions. The recruitment of women to the police forces and the military amply demonstrates our commitment to women's empowerment in both the national and the international arenas. We are pleased that we were able to deploy a full contingent — an all- female formed police unit — to the friendly country of Haiti following the devastating earthquake there. I am pleased to report that our all-male troop contingents are fully briefed on gender issues. We provide the necessary on-the-job training to reinforce their understanding and sensitivity in that regard. We are aware that we need to mainstream a gender perspective into all conflict prevention activities and strategies, develop effective gender-sensitive early warning mechanisms and institutions and strengthen efforts to prevent violence against women, including various forms of gender-based violence.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    Through the adoption by the Security Council of resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions, the United Nations has been able to develop, integrate and fine-tune the tools available to it to address a gender perspective in a multidimensional manner, by recognizing the importance of women's active participation in the various stages of conflict prevention and resolution, as well as in peacekeeping, reconstruction and peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    My delegation is concerned about the identification of patterns of sexual violence in conflict and postconflict situations in many States and regions. Sexual violence as a tactic of war stokes crises, fuels the continuation of armed conflict, promotes the displacement of people, limits subsistence activities and reduces opportunities for development. In order to avert that phenomenon, it is pivotal that peacekeeping mission personnel as well as mediation and electoral assistance teams have sufficient specialized expertise in the field of gender and sexual violence and also have the capacity to act in a timely manner so as to initiate the relevant investigations.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    The presence of additional female peacekeepers and female staff in peacebuilding operations, at both the military police and civilian levels, would have a clear positive effect. It is therefore necessary to increase the number of women who hold high-ranking posts in such operations. We welcome the decision of the Peacebuilding Fund to allocate $5 million to the gender promotion initiative; we hope that this will lead to tangible results in the short term.

  • Country

    Fiji
  • Extracts

    Fiji's commitment to the resolution is exemplified in our policies that, amongst other things, strongly encourage the recruitment of women in our security forces and their deployment with equal opportunities to peacekeeping missions. We support the global effort to increase the participation of women in UN police peacekeeping roles to 20% by 2014. We encourage the provision of pre and post deployment training of our peacekeepers and welcome further assistance and expertise in this regard. Furthermore, we support the participation and representation of women at all levels of decision-making.
  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    We are pleased to note that resolution 1325 (2000) has continued to open new perspectives of awareness about women's role in peace negotiations, humanitarian planning, peacekeeping operations, post- conflict peacebuilding and governance. Even so, there is a wide gap between aspirations and the reality on the ground. The report of the Secretary-General on women and peace and security (S/2011/598*) provides a strategic road map for the United Nations, together with national, regional and international stakeholders.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    We must continue to ensure that women play key roles in peacekeeping operations and political missions; we must not only look at gender as a thematic issue, but ensure that women hold key and responsible positions at every level. We endorse the recommendations of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations that a larger proportion of women be deployed in the military and police contingents of peacekeeping operations, and recruited into the armed forces and police services of Member States, with pre-deployment training for military and police on gender issues. It is through these actions that we can achieve the target of women constituting 20 per cent of peacekeeping operations by 2014, from the highest decision-making level to field operations.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    As outlined in the concept note (S/2011/654, annex) circulated for this debate, the participation of women in decision-making forums related to conflict prevention and resolution, peacebuilding and post conflict recovery is a central goal of the women, peace and security agenda. Research has shown that the exclusion of women and the lack of gender expertise in peace negotiations lead to irreversible setbacks for women's rights. Peace accords often neglect to ensure the engagement of women in post-conflict governance and their access to economic opportunities, justice and reparations.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Resolution 1325 (2000) is relevant to the implementation of Lithuania's foreign, security and development cooperation policy objectives, as well as our participation in international peacebuilding and peacekeeping missions. Lithuania was one of 38 Member States that contributed to the Secretary-General's report on women and peace and security (S/2011/598*).
  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    Indeed, while acknowledging that important progress has been accomplished in the implementation of resolution 1325 and the subsequent resolutions on Women Peace and Security, we need to recognize that significant challenges still remain: women are still underrepresented at the several levels of peacekeeping and peacebuilding efforts as they are inadequately represented in formal peace negotiations. The exclusion of women from peace talks and peacebuilding efforts often means that insufficient attention is paid to addressing gender disparities and women's needs and concerns in the post conflict phase, thus reinforcing a circle of inequality and marginalization.

  • Country

    Ukraine
  • Extracts

    The focus of today's debate on the participation and role of women in conflict prevention and mediation could not be more timely. Ukraine has always stressed the need for the widest possible use of the potential of women in the spheres of preventive diplomacy, peacekeeping and peacebuilding. We believe that there is still much to be done to redress the current underrepresentation of women in decision- making with regard to conflict resolution so as to make their voice heard loud and clear in peace negotiations. In that context, we welcome the adoption of the first-ever resolution on “Strengthening the role of mediation in the peaceful settlement of disputes and conflict prevention and resolution” (General Assembly resolution 65/283). In that document, all Member States resolved to promote the equal, full and effective participation of women at all levels of the peaceful settlement of disputes, conflict prevention and resolution, as well as to provide adequate gender expertise for all mediators and their teams.

  • Country

    Ukraine
  • Extracts

    My delegation prides itself on the long record of participation of Ukrainian women, as civilian police and military observers, in United Nations peacekeeping efforts. Currently, they are deployed in five United Nations peacekeeping operations — in Côte d'Ivoire, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, South Sudan and Timor-Leste. Their dedicated service to peace is one of the concrete ways in which Ukraine contributes to advancing the agenda of today's meeting on the ground.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    The Secretary-General's report provides examples of both real progress and the challenges ahead of us. We welcome the initiative of DPKO and DPA to include gender components, advisors, or focal points in all field missions on this issue. We're pleased that a gender and mediation specialist has been appointed to the Standby Team of Mediation Experts to ensure that women's concerns are addressed in conflict prevention and resolution, and not just toward the end of a conflict, as is often the case. And we are encouraged that a growing number of reports to the Security Council, as well as mission mandate renewal resolutions, address issues related to women in conflict and post-conflict situations. However, as the Secretary-General noted, "mere reference to women, peace and security resolutions is not enough." We must give UN entities strong support to implement and deliver results for gender equality.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    More can be done to ensure that personnel of UN missions are adequately prepared to implement resolution 1325 and supported in their efforts. Both pre-deployment training and mission-wide strategies on the protection of civilians, including the needs of vulnerable groups such as women and girls, need to be improved. Gaps also remain in ensuring that those serving in UN missions are held accountable for their performance, particularly in the case of sexual exploitation and abuse. As the Secretary-General acknowledged, "the UN still lacks a system that enables complaints of sexual exploitation and abuse to be reported safely." The United Nations needs to lead by example by actively enforcing the zero tolerance policy on sexual exploitation and abuse by UN peacekeepers. Conflict-related sexual violence must be addressed from the very start in peace processes, and more women should be included as mediators and members of negotiating teams.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    The United Nations and its Member States need to further increase the number of women in peacekeeping operations and political missions in order to ensure gender expertise in the planning of missions and in all mediation efforts, and to enhance the appointment of women to senior leadership positions. The Secretary-General's seven-point action plan on women's participation in peacebuilding (see S/2010/466) contains important commitments in that regard, and we encourage the United Nations system to take them forward.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Fourth and last, the Security Council could do more to systematically integrate women, peace and security issues in its daily work, including when mandating or renewing UN missions. Envoys and Special Representatives should address those issues, where relevant, in their briefings to the Council. I would like to conclude, Madam President, by expressing Germany's support for the presidential statement adopted today.
  • Country

    Kyrgyzstan
  • Extracts

    Following the inter-ethnic conflict in southern Kyrgyzstan in 2010, special importance was given to supporting female initiatives in the area of conflict resolution, peacebuilding and post-conflict reconstruction. In that difficult time, women activists joined together to form women's peacekeeping networks in order to put an end to conflict and violence and to prevent a recurrence of the tragic events.

    My country notes the timely and swift reaction of the United Nations Peacebuilding Fund, which funded projects to promote national reconciliation and post- conflict reconstruction. Today, the women's peacekeeping network includes 20 local women's peace committees and serves as the link between local communities and the central Government.
    Kyrgyzstan believes that the key role in coordinating agreed measures on women's participation in conflict prevention and peacebuilding efforts should be played by the new entity UN-Women. Through close partnerships with UN-Women, UNICEF, the United Nations Development Programme and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, in May the network of Kyrgyzstan women peacekeepers began to implement 11 projects aimed at fostering inter-ethnic harmony and ensuring peace in post-conflict areas of Kyrgyzstan. We also consider it necessary to more actively promote that component in the action strategy of the United Nations Regional Centre for Preventive Diplomacy for Central Asia.
  • Country

    Kyrgyzstan
  • Extracts

    Kyrgyzstan believes that United Nations peacekeeping operations serve as the main tool for maintaining peace in conflict zones. In that respect, my country supports the efforts to enhance the role of women in the field missions of peacekeeping operations. It would be relevant to expand the targeted training programme for women to relevant positions in United Nations peacekeeping missions.

    In the future, Kyrgyzstan intends to increase the number of women serving in the military and police contingents of United Nations peacekeeping operations. We have developed draft legislation on principles and procedures for the participation of the Kyrgyz Republic in the maintenance of international peace and security, which also incorporates a gender perspective.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    We welcome the Secretary-General's conclusions in his recent report (S/2011/598*) that the indicators proposed last year (S/2010/498), which were endorsed by the Council in its presidential statement of 26 October 2010 (S/PRST/2010/22), had made a major contribution to consistency and coherence in international efforts. We appreciate the Secretary- General's candid assessment of the challenges that lie ahead and support his observations and recommendations. We must focus our efforts even more on implementing the normative framework created over the past 11 years. The strategic results framework is the right tool to accurately measure progress or the absence of it. We encourage the Secretary-General to continue to collect data based on the set of indicators presented in his 2010 report. At the same time, we encourage the entire United Nations system and all Member States to help the Secretary-General to implement his zero-tolerance policy on sexual exploitation and abuse perpetrated by the Blue Helmets. Beyond the suffering of women and girls, which we have a moral obligation to prevent, the credibility of the Organization and of our efforts in peacekeeping and peacebuilding in general is at stake.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    Regarding specific recent actions, allow me to highlight the first version of an international course on a gender comprehensive approach to operations, organized by the Ministries of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation and of Defence of my country, in cooperation with their counterpart departments of the Government of the Netherlands, and held from 14 to 18 June in Madrid. The course focuses on implementing the international community's appeals, specifically resolution 1960 (2010), and also the recommendations of the NATO Lisbon Summit, to invest greater efforts in the training of civil and military employees on gender issues. Through practical exercises, it focuses on the integration of the gender perspective in civilian and military peacekeeping operations in various kinds of conflicts. Professional academic, military and civilian speakers of the United Nations, NATO and European Union took part in the course.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    For a start, I would like to emphasize that women's security is part of overall peace and security and that women can contribute to peace processes and are very able to do so. The involvement of women in peacekeeping operations and conflict prevention is of the utmost importance to ensure the success of the operations, as it is the only way to reach the whole population.

  • Country

    Senegal
  • Extracts

    While welcoming the zero tolerance policy on sexual violence of the Secretary-General, we must, in addition, insist on the need to bolster the role of women in conflict-prevention and resolution. Nevertheless, the poor results in that area have undoubtedly been due to the continuing low participation of women in the drafting of implementation strategies. I consider it crucial, therefore, to foster women's participation by reserving a key role for them in conflict-prevention policies, as well as policies on peacekeeping, peacebuilding and social and economic recovery. In that context, there must be a special focus on women's empowerment, which will require significant investment in education, training and maternal health.

  • Country

    Senegal
  • Extracts

    It is certain that those significant national and regional level initiatives are welcome. However, they will achieve the desired success only if linked with an international dynamic inspired by the Security Council and based on coordinated efforts on the part of UN-Women and all of the other relevant bodies. There is also a need to improve women's involvement in peacekeeping operations by following up on the laudable efforts already carried out in that domain.

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    I cannot conclude without expressing my appreciation for the report's mention of Argentina's efforts to increase the number of Argentine women deployed in its armed and security forces, as well as to peacekeeping missions. The report also notes our initiatives to develop and improve training in the specific protection rights and needs of women and girls. We will pursue such efforts in the conviction that, 11 years after the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), much remains to be done if we are to achieve its full and effective implementation.

Human Rights
  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    Finally, we would like to reiterate that approaches to human rights that focus exclusively in monitoring mechanisms do not contribute to achieving sustainable solutions, unlike mechanisms for cooperation, constructive dialogue and effective support for countries,which do indeed genuinely contribute to effective solutions.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    We firmly believe that women should be involved in the policymaking and post-conflict planning and programming processes. It is also important to increase the number of gender experts on the roster. Furthermore, the various implementation gaps should be addressed more systematically, including through improved coordination and accountability for results. Clarity, comparability and consistency are necessary in order to monitor the impact of various efforts on women's empowerment and their rights.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    Gender equality and the empowerment of women remain the key focus area of social development and distributive justice globally. Empowering women politically, economically, educationally and legally has been a major objective of the Government of India. We are proud of the fact that India gave women equal voting rights more than 60 years ago, at the time of our independence. In 1992, we amended our Constitution and reserved 33 per cent of the seats for women in local- and district-level governance institutions and bodies. That was subsequently raised to 50 per cent in 2009. Currently, we have more than 1.5 million elected women representatives in local bodies. That is the biggest mobilization of women worldwide in politics at the local Government and the rural and district levels.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The promotion and protection of the human rights of women and girls in armed conflict continue to pose a pressing challenge. The Council has in previous resolutions recognized the specific vulnerability of women during conflicts and that they bear a disproportionate brunt of armed conflict, even though they are in most cases not directly engaged in combat. There should be zero tolerance for gender-based violence, and incidents of gender-based violence must be unequivocally condemned. All cases of gender based violence in an armed conflict, whether perpetrated by parties to the conflict, peacekeeping personnel or humanitarian actors, must be promptly investigated and the perpetrators prosecuted.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    The adoption of resolution 1325 (2000) was hailed as a landmark and groundbreaking resolution. For the first time, the importance of women's full participation in conflict prevention, conflict resolution and peacebuilding at all levels was recognized. Since then, the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and its sister resolutions have paved the way for the mainstreaming of the gender perspective in United Nations peacekeeping operations and missions worldwide. In a similar vein, the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, which also addresses women and armed conflict, should continue to be implemented. Those various international frameworks on women are complementary and mutually reinforce our efforts to protect the rights of women in conflict situations.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Indeed, in congratulating the three outstanding women who were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize this year, President Johnson-Sirleaf of Liberia, her compatriot Ms. Leymah Gbowee and Ms. Tawakkul Karman of Yemen, President Jacob Zuma underscored the important contribution that women continue to play in their ongoing struggle for women's rights, dignity, peace and development all over the world. The vast majority of women are not involved in creating wars, but they remain the primary victims of war and conflict. Long after the guns have ceased blazing, their children and families continue to suffer the devastating effects of the aftermath of conflict. Women are the ones left to pick up the pieces and to rebuild families and their communities.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    Exactly a week ago, the Security Council resolution on Yemen (resolution 2014 (2011)) called upon all concerned parties to improve women's participation in conflict resolution and encouraged them to facilitate the equal and full participation of women at decision making levels. Yesterday's resolution on Libya (resolution 2016 (2011)) emphasized the importance of the full and equal participation of women and the respect for the human rights of all. We welcome these very strong calls.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    During this eventful year, women have taken to the streets and squares across North Africa and the Middle East and demanded change, equality, freedom and justice alongside men. We call on the Security Council to ensure that women's voices are heard and reflected in planning, actions and results. Provisions on women's full participation and on the protection and promotion of women's human rights should be included in all relevant country-specific resolutions, and they should be systematically followed up when the special envoys and Special Representatives of the Secretary-General report back to the Council.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    The Nordic countries have engaged in twinning and cooperation with partner countries, including Afghanistan, Kenya, Liberia, Nepal and the Philippines. We provide technical and financial support for the development of their new structures. But we also learn from them and hope that in this way our activities will be more responsive to the needs and priorities of countries with recent experience of conflict or fragility. Together we foster political will for women's rights in every part of the world. The Nordic countries have greatly benefited from the advice and partnership of civil society. We support the work of local and regional non-governmental organizations from Afghanistan to the Great Lakes region and from Nepal to the Sudan.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    Secondly, we are pleased to report a clear increase in the number of women among the military, police and civilian peacekeepers deployed. We also committed to train our personnel on gender equality and human rights. The mixed police teams deployed in Haiti, Liberia and Afghanistan have all received training on resolution 1325 (2000). Some have been specifically trained to address sexual and gender-based violence. We have developed a human rights manual for all crisis management personnel and supported gender-sensitive security sector reform in Palestine and the Balkans.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    Second, women's rights must be an integral part of peace agreements. One of the measurement of the success of a peace settlement is the extent to which obligations under the Convention on the Discrimination against Women and other international human rights conventions are fulfilled.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    Third, it is not enough to simply advocate the participation of women in peace processes. We need to provide concrete support for women to build the skills needed for meaningful involvement. And education is crucial. At the same time, social barriers blocking women's access to peace processes need to be addressed. Since men are also a part of the equation, civic education and human rights programmes for both men and women at the community level can help lift these barriers and hammer home the importance of gender inclusiveness. We must also support civil society organizations, in particular women's groups, which are vital to creating better links among women and between state and community.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    In December 2010 Italy adopted a three-year action plan on Resolution 1325. The plan provides a strategic framework to improve implementation of 1325 by having a national focal point at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs monitor all relevant activities. The plan focuses on key goals such as: increasing the number of women in the national Police and in the armed Forces; strengthening the inclusion of women in peace operations and in the decision-making bodies of peace operations; protecting the human rights of women and children, in conflict and post-conflict; strengthening women's participation in peace processes; and engaging with civil society organizations to promote the implementation of Resolution 1325.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    Since then Italy has had regular contacts with civil society organizations to benefit from their experience in the field, particularly in the collection of sex-disaggregated data. The national focal point is promoting awareness activities by disseminating the plan throughout all sectors of Government and society. At the international level, Italy has introduced “Women, Peace, and Security” as a priority question to be raised during the Universal Periodic Review of Human Rights Council, when the human rights situation of Member States under consideration are being addressed, in addition to bringing up the issue in bilateral contacts with the countries concerned.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    There can be no doubt that the establishment of UN-Women constitutes a milestone in the defence of the rights and the protection of women. In June, Under-Secretary-General achelet submitted to Member States a first strategic plan, which my country fully supports.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    The main action lines of that document are to apply a gender focus to the respect and promotion of human rights; to promote the equal participation of women both in peacekeeping operations and in related decision-making bodies; to bring a gender perspective in the broadest sense of the term to bear on the design, implementation and execution of our international cooperation policies; to strengthen the technical capacity of both public officials and civil society with regard to gender issues and security and conflict; and to promote the regional implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) through the exchange of experience and international cooperation, both bilaterally and via the regional peacekeeping operations in which Chile takes part, particularly in the context of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti.

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    Such efforts at creating the right conditions for ensuring women's full participation should include increasing the participation and representation of women in preventive diplomacy initiatives. It should also include strengthening the capacities of the relevant Government institutions and women's organizations involved with conflict and post-conflict issues, the adequate representation of women in the negotiation and implementation of peace agreements, support for local women's peace initiatives, the promotion and protection of the human rights of women, higher levels of representation in decision-making roles, and ensuring proper coherence and coordination among the United Nations entities responsible for implementing the women, peace and security agenda in the entire United Nations system.

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    Nigeria is also committed to fulfilling its obligations under the African Charter of Human and Peoples' Rights on the rights of women in Africa. As Ms. Bachelet has often said, the obstacles to women's political participation, which I believe have a direct bearing on their capacity to play an active role in preventive diplomacy and conflict prevention, are indeed enormous. Violence, poverty, lack of access to education and health care, and limited economic opportunities all combine to undermine the role of women and girls in conflict prevention, peace negotiations and peacebuilding. It is therefore necessary that we develop and take measures to address these inherent obstacles. Promoting women's equality and empowerment is, in our view, one of the best ways to address the root causes of conflict and therefore prevent such conflict. I envisage a presidential statement along those lines in the near future.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    Resolution 1325 (2000), adopted 11 years ago, represents a fundamental milestone, because ever since its adoption the issue of the role of women in peace and security has occupied an important place on the agenda of the Security Council. As a result, it has taken on an important and essential role in the achievement of international peace and security. The resolution has served as the point of departure for subsequent developments on this issue in the Security Council when it comes to ensuring the participation of women in peacekeeping and peacebuilding and, most especially, with regard to combating sexual violence against women and girls. For that reason, along with international human rights law and international humanitarian law, resolution 1325 (2000) and resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010) provide the international community with a normative framework for considering the needs of women in conflict and post-conflict situations.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    Because combating the impunity of gender violence is fundamental to peacekeeping processes, States need to strengthen their judicial systems so that such cases can be brought to trial. In that regard, it will continue to be equally important to pursue the ratification of the Statute of the International Criminal Court.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    We have moved forward in recognizing the importance of women's participation in peace and security. However, we still face many challenges. What is most important is to join forces so that women and girls are able to exercise their right to live without fear, without violence and with respect and equality of opportunity.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    There can be no lasting peace unless we guarantee access to justice as well as accountability and support the fight against impunity. In that regard, I wish to recall that the International Criminal Court could exercise its jurisdiction with regard to such crimes.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    We have also made strides in ensuring the rule of law, most recently the establishment of a national commission on the elimination of violence against women, following the enactment of the law in that
    regard in December 2010. Those steps have been vital in enhancing Afghan women's access to legal redress and have also sent a strong message that the Afghanistan Government is committed to the rights of women and to ensuring that there is no impunity for those who violate them.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    Ensuring the rights of women is only half of the battle; we also need to see the full participation of women, as resolution 1325 (2000) reminds us that they have a vital role to play in peace and security. The representation of women in governance and their political participation has steadily increased. We have succeeded in holding two presidential and two parliamentary elections, in which women actively participated as candidates, elections staff, poll monitors and electorates. Women comprise 25 per cent of the Parliament, thus ranking Afghanistan thirtieth among the countries of the world with the highest rate of women representatives in Parliament. The Afghanistan National parliament has also established a resource centre for women parliamentarians to enhance their capacity to effectively include women's voices and perspectives in national development and reconstruction plans. When reviewing these facts and figures, let us not lose sight of the great personal risk that these women undertake in order to participate in the governance of their country and in their future. I wish to take this opportunity to honour the women who continue take risks in order to assume an active role in the future direction, peace and security of our country.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    Our international partners have assisted the Afghan Government in our endeavours. UN-Women has administered a multi-donor trust fund for the elimination of violence against women that provided grants for national organizations to combat violence against women. I am very pleased to report that, in collaboration with UN-Women, Afghanistan has submitted its first country report on the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. The continued collaboration of our Government, international partners and both Afghan and international civil society groups will be vital to ensure the full realization of women's rights in a strong and stable Afghanistan.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    Allow me to conclude by referring to the matter of justice, which is a major issue in the implementation of the resolution on women and peace and security. How can women express themselves and participate in public life if they must live alongside their former tortures, or live in fear and under oppression? How can they have access to justice if the road to justice entails humiliation, threats and reprisals? Access to justice and combating impunity are essential elements in ensuring women's full participation. In particular, there is a duty on the part of the international community to make use of all the instruments available to it — establishing commissions of inquiry, making referrals to the International Criminal Court and putting in place targeted sanctions, in the case of serious violations and systematic assaults on the rights of women. Only then will the efforts of the international community take on genuine credibility when it comes to protecting women and promoting their participation in conflict resolution.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    The flagship agency on gender — UN-Women — has begun to prove its leadership in theimplementation of resolution 1325 (2000) through United Nations system-wide coherence. It has been able to pulled together a set of key universal and regional human rights instruments. The focus on women and peace and security can be further strengthenedthrough collaboration with humanitarian, human rights and aid- to-development agencies, and the defence forces of concerned United Nations Member States, as well as with all categories of women, including activists, war victims, refugees, asylum-seekers and migrants. To conclude, we must go forward to strengthen resolution 1325 (2000), structured on the three main pillars of participation, protection and prevention, and is a most powerful tool for women's organizing, mobilization and action.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    As outlined in the concept note (S/2011/654, annex) circulated for this debate, the participation of women in decision-making forums related to conflict prevention and resolution, peacebuilding and post conflict recovery is a central goal of the women, peace and security agenda. Research has shown that the exclusion of women and the lack of gender expertise in peace negotiations lead to irreversible setbacks for women's rights. Peace accords often neglect to ensure the engagement of women in post-conflict governance and their access to economic opportunities, justice and reparations.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Last June, women leaders from all parts of the world — Special Representative of the SecretaryGeneral Wallström among them — met in Vilnius at a conference entitled “Women Enhancing Democracy: Best Practices” under the Lithuanian presidency of the Community of Democracies, and shared their experiences and best practices in enhancing the role of women. The Working Group on Gender Equality and Women's Rights, co-chaired by the United States of America and Lithuania, discussed, among other priority issues, women and peace and security. The conference showed that, in many parts of the world, the involvement of women is still low. Indeed, women could and should play a bigger role in human rights and security monitoring and establish early warning systems to generate information about specific threats, peace talks, donor conferences, elections and decision- making.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    The Lithuanian National Programme on Equal Opportunities for Women and Men 2010-2014 raised, for the first time, gender issues in the national defence system and included measures for training gender experts who will now prepare Lithuanian personnel in this area for deployment to missions and operations. As announced by Lithuanian President Dalia Grybauskaitė during the General Assembly general debate in September (see A/66/PV.16), Lithuania drew up its first national action plan for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in 2011. We seek through the national action plan to facilitate outreach to our society concerning the aims of the resolution, to promote and protect women's rights, to encourage them to participate in international military and civil operations and missions, to involve more institutions and non-governmental organizations, and to streamline activities at all levels.
  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    In the Prevention Pillar, the U.S. has developed multiple programs that seek to address the root causes of conflict, including a $26 million annual Reconciliation Program that supports innovative programming in conflict-affected countries and includes gender analysis. In the Relief and Recovery Pillar, the U.S. has provided significant funding to improve water and sanitation in situations in which women's safety and security are at risk.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    The topic of our debate is a very timely one. Today we should acknowledge the important contribution made by women in the Arab world to bring about political transformation, and the decisive role they have played and continue to play in the quest for democracy, transparent political systems, the rule of law and the promotion and protection of human rights. It is difficult to imagine the achievements of the Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya without the active participation of women and young people, and it is difficult to imagine a successful and inclusive democratic transformation process without their active participation.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    The PRST to be adopted today clearly recognizes once again the significant role of women in prevention, conflict resolution and post conflict rebuilding. Including women in peace initiatives is not a benevolent act, we see it as a key requirement to any lasting, sustainable peace. Women's participation will strengthen the capacity to resolve conflict and build security and justice systems that protect the human rights of all. However, we have still existing gaps between repeated commitments and the situation on the ground. Women remain severely under-represented in peace negotiations and they are often marginalized in efforts to build sustainable peace.

  • Country

    Israel
  • Extracts

    We must recognize the clear connection between advancing peace and advancing equal rights for women.

Justice, Rule of Law and Security Sector Reform
  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    There has been legislation in place in this area since 1992, recently updated by a law in 2011 that provides for and promotes the participation of women in the exercise of legislative policy work in the Congress, as well as in the executive and judicial branches. There are now 37 women in the Colombian parliament. The highest positions in the country's public prosecutors' and comptrollers' offices are held by women. In the Ministry for Foreign Affairs, the Minister and two deputy ministers are women, from whom I receive orders — I mean, instructions — every day.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Conflict and post-conflict situations often bring violence and deprivation of rights. Addressing conflict related or sexual and gender-based violence, and combating various abuses of women and girls' rights, is an integral part of the women and peace and security agenda. In that context, we emphasize the importance of bringing those responsible for crimes against women and girls to justice. A range of existing legal and reconciliation mechanisms should be used at the national or international level, while support for national institutions and institutional reforms must be an integral part of this process.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    The role of the United Nations is to support Member States in this multifaceted process. It is important to create useful guidelines adapted to specific country situations, and to support the development of activities related to women and peace and security in the context of existing international obligations, rooted in national legislation.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    Key aspects of post-conflict reconstruction, such as economic recovery, social cohesion and political legitimacy, all require the active engagement of women. Resolution 1325 (2000) was a seminal piece of international legislation in our efforts on women and peace and security. The United Nations, Member States and civil society have made steady and noticeable efforts in implementing the resolution. However, the results remain mixed, with important gaps remaining in fully realizing its provisions.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    Women and girls are much more vulnerable to the impacts of violent conflict than men, due to the breakdown of social and legal systems when violence occurs and because of inherent gender inequalities. Women frequently bear the brunt of the devastating consequences of armed violence, including sexual violence.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    Of course, when we talk about conflict prevention we are talking not just about involving women in preventive diplomacy. We also speak of the much broader agenda of ensuring that drivers of conflict do not have the chance to surface. Democratic institutions, the rule of law and economic development are foundations of peaceful societies. We cannot expect such societies to flourish without embracing the role that women play in shaping them.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    Peace negotiations not only shape the post-conflict political landscape directly, through agreements on justice, power-sharing and constitutional issues, but also indirectly, by lending legitimacy to those represented at the peace table. A properly integrated role for women enhances the prospects of a durable and lasting peace.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    In post-conflict planning and budgeting, there should be targeted actions and sector-specific gender experts for all relevant areas, such as security sector reform and economic recovery. The Secretary-General's seven-point action plan on peacebuilding (see S/2010/466) provides detailed recommendations on that. We welcome the work done so far. However, much remains to be done, and we encourage the United Nations to implement all of the recommendations without delay. As donors, we commit to do our part both by supporting women's participation in post-conflict donor conferences and by directing funding for initiatives that contribute to gender equality.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    Secondly, we are pleased to report a clear increase in the number of women among the military, police and civilian peacekeepers deployed. We also committed to train our personnel on gender equality and human rights. The mixed police teams deployed in Haiti, Liberia and Afghanistan have all received training on resolution 1325 (2000). Some have been specifically trained to address sexual and gender-based violence. We have developed a human rights manual for all crisis management personnel and supported gender-sensitive security sector reform in Palestine and the Balkans.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    Thirdly, we have increased our efforts to fight impunity, with due attention to the rights of victims. Justice, including meaningful reparations for victims, is essential in restoring the confidence of the people in their Government. There should never be amnesty for the most serious crimes, including sexual violence, which can constitute war crimes and crimes against humanity. We remain staunch supporters of the International Criminal Court and have been at the forefront of the work linking its complementarity principle with development activities that strengthen rule of law at the national level. We have also led the discussions around the review of the Court's strategy for victims, and we support its Trust Fund for Victims.
  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    We note that much progress has been made in developing a normative framework to strengthen the action of the international community. Resolution 1325 (2000) is the foundation of that structure. That foundation has expanded and now forms a body with resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010). Together, those resolutions offer the Council and the international community as a whole a vast body of values and principles that can guide our action in matters of participation, protection, capacity building and the fight against impunity, but also in the rehabilitation and reintegration of women in society in the context of peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    Although women are widely recognized as effective agents of peace, they still have little access to decision-making positions and peace negotiations. Women in the aftermath of conflict have little or no protection or access to services, justice and economic security, and those are the areas in which women's needs and gaps in response are most evident. Furthermore, the inclusion of women and gender expertise in peacebuilding activities is essential to reconstituting political, legal, cultural and socio- economic and social structures. Gender equality brings new degrees of democratic inclusiveness to peacebuilding, faster and more durable economic growth, and human and social capital recovery.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    Resolution 1325 (2000), adopted 11 years ago, represents a fundamental milestone, because ever since its adoption the issue of the role of women in peace and security has occupied an important place on the agenda of the Security Council. As a result, it has taken on an important and essential role in the achievement of international peace and security. The resolution has served as the point of departure for subsequent developments on this issue in the Security Council when it comes to ensuring the participation of women in peacekeeping and peacebuilding and, most especially, with regard to combating sexual violence against women and girls. For that reason, along with international human rights law and international humanitarian law, resolution 1325 (2000) and resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010) provide the international community with a normative framework for considering the needs of women in conflict and post-conflict situations.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    Because combating the impunity of gender violence is fundamental to peacekeeping processes, States need to strengthen their judicial systems so that such cases can be brought to trial. In that regard, it will continue to be equally important to pursue the ratification of the Statute of the International Criminal Court.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    Women are decisive actors in the three pillars of achieving lasting peace, namely, economic recovery, social cohesion and political legitimacy. In that respect, it is essential that emphasis be placed in all post conflict phases on strengthening the rule of law as well as the economic and political empowerment of women in order to guarantee their full insertion in the community.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    Despite important national, regional and international efforts, however, the conditions that women and girls still face in situations of armed conflict continue to be abhorrent. The benefits of resolution 1325 (2000) have yet to reach most women in conflict and in fragile settings. In that regard, allow me to make the following comments. First, we view the prevention of conflict as a crucial element of resolution 1325 (2000). That includes the prevention of all forms of conflict-related violence against women and girls. Sexual violence remains the least-condemned war crime in peace agreements and beyond. The elimination of impunity is perhaps the single most effective preventive tool to fight that crime. In that regard, reforming the security sector and ensuring respect for the rule of law in a gender-responsive manner is of crucial importance. Conflict and post-conflict societies should be assisted in those areas as early as possible. The preventive aspect of resolution 1325 (2000) also includes women's full and equal involvement in conflict prevention efforts. We concur with the Secretary-General's report (S/2011/598*) that more attention needs to be paid to women's roles in the field. We support his recommendation for the Council to use its deliberations on preventive diplomacy and mediation to consider means of enhancing the role of women in conflict prevention.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    There can be no lasting peace unless we guarantee access to justice as well as accountability and support the fight against impunity. In that regard, I wish to recall that the International Criminal Court could exercise its jurisdiction with regard to such crimes.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    We believe that the provisions of these Security Council resolutions are relevant at both the international and national levels. In Mexico, following an approach to prevent violence, the institutions that are responsible for monitoring security, safety and law enforcement receive ongoing training in the field of gender affairs. As a result, more women have become involved in the administration of justice, with the notable example of the appointment of the Attorney- General, Marisela Morales — the first Mexican woman to hold this important post. In turn, the national defence agency has trained almost 80,000 personnel in the field of gender equity, and this year will see the graduation of the first female air force pilot. In the diplomatic sphere, a high number of female representatives have had a bearing my country's foreign policy, starting with Ms. Patricia Espinosa Cantellano, Minister for Foreign Affairs.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    We have also made strides in ensuring the rule of law, most recently the establishment of a national commission on the elimination of violence against women, following the enactment of the law in that
    regard in December 2010. Those steps have been vital in enhancing Afghan women's access to legal redress and have also sent a strong message that the Afghanistan Government is committed to the rights of women and to ensuring that there is no impunity for those who violate them.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    Allow me to conclude by referring to the matter of justice, which is a major issue in the implementation of the resolution on women and peace and security. How can women express themselves and participate in public life if they must live alongside their former tortures, or live in fear and under oppression? How can they have access to justice if the road to justice entails humiliation, threats and reprisals? Access to justice and combating impunity are essential elements in ensuring women's full participation. In particular, there is a duty on the part of the international community to make use of all the instruments available to it — establishing commissions of inquiry, making referrals to the International Criminal Court and putting in place targeted sanctions, in the case of serious violations and systematic assaults on the rights of women. Only then will the efforts of the international community take on genuine credibility when it comes to protecting women and promoting their participation in conflict resolution.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    The prevention of the violation of women and girls' human rights, including sexual violence, must enjoy the highest priority. It is high time that we bring war criminals to justice, end impunity for their atrocities, and invest in immediate service and assistance mechanisms for women and girl war crime victims. Our focus must also be on including women in peace processes as mediators, members of negotiating parties, and signatories to peace agreements.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    The Rome Statute of the ICC has significantly advanced international law by including sexual violence in the definition of crimes, in particular as a crime against humanity. The ICC therefore represents an important mechanism in the fight against sexual violence, which should be better integrated in the Security Council work on the issue.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    The Rome Statute of the ICC has significantly advanced international law by including sexual violence in the definition of crimes, in particular as a crime against humanity. The ICC therefore represents an important mechanism in the fight against sexual violence, which should be better integrated in the Security Council work on the issue.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    In Afghanistan, the UK has funded a full range of measures undertaken by the Criminal Justice Task Force to minimise gender-related barriers to working in a high profile law enforcement environment. And we supported the Government of Nepal's efforts to develop its own National Action Plan to generate, among many other things, work to provide support for women and girls who have been the victims of sexual violence. We encourage more countries to develop National Action Plans in order to strengthen the implementation of Resolution 1325 and associated resolutions.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    The topic of our debate is a very timely one. Today we should acknowledge the important contribution made by women in the Arab world to bring about political transformation, and the decisive role they have played and continue to play in the quest for democracy, transparent political systems, the rule of law and the promotion and protection of human rights. It is difficult to imagine the achievements of the Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya without the active participation of women and young people, and it is difficult to imagine a successful and inclusive democratic transformation process without their active participation.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    The issue of women's participation in peace talks and other conflict-related negotiations certainly contains more than an element of justice. It is also an issue of effectiveness, which has a direct impact on the success of conflict resolution and mediation efforts. Women can bring to the table unique perspectives on issues such as impunity, accountability, and justice. If these perspectives are addressed in negotiations, the chance of achieving a sustainable peace will be much greater.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    Last month, during the general debate and at an event on women's political participation, President Dilma Rousseff made it clear that the empowerment of women is high on Brazil's agenda. We have enacted advanced legislation on the protection of women, established specialized police stations for women's issues, and put women at the centre of our Bolsa Familia cash transfer programme. These are valuable experiences that we are ready to share with other countries, including those emerging from conflict.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    The PRST to be adopted today clearly recognizes once again the significant role of women in prevention, conflict resolution and post conflict rebuilding. Including women in peace initiatives is not a benevolent act, we see it as a key requirement to any lasting, sustainable peace. Women's participation will strengthen the capacity to resolve conflict and build security and justice systems that protect the human rights of all. However, we have still existing gaps between repeated commitments and the situation on the ground. Women remain severely under-represented in peace negotiations and they are often marginalized in efforts to build sustainable peace.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Third, with regard to the national level: Last year the German Government presented its third report to Parliament on its implementation of SR resolution 1325. It contains, inter alia, projects on gender training, including for UN peacekeepers, prevention of sexual violence, enabling women's participation in peace-processes as well as their unhindered access to justice. A special focus lies on the support for women's organizations and NGOs in promoting women's empowerment. In addition, the German Government has set up action plans on “gender in development aid programmes” and on “civilian crisis prevention”. Germany implements the indicators adopted by the European Union in 2010.

  • Country

    Kyrgyzstan
  • Extracts

    Preventive actions in post-conflict countries, including comprehensive reform of judicial and law enforcement systems, are important as the only way to ensure the rule of law and better protection of the rights of women, particularly in protecting them from violence and increasing their participation in the law enforcement sector. My country believes that positive experience in that area must be mainstreamed and disseminated.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    We welcome the United Nations strategic results framework and the set of indicators on women and peace and security, which guide the implementation of resolutions, and we also welcome the comprehensive report on the NATO/ Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council policy on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and related resolutions. In addition, we believe that the International Criminal Court has an important role to play in ending impunity in crimes against women.

  • Country

    S. Korea
  • Extracts

    First, eliminating impunity is critical to preventing gender-based crimes. We commend the Council's continued efforts to fight impunity and uphold accountability for serious crimes against women and girls.

  • Country

    S. Korea
  • Extracts

    States need to further strengthen their justice systems to prosecute gender based crimes and improve systems for the protection of victims and witnesses.

  • Country

    Senegal
  • Extracts

    My delegation has a special interest in the topic, because resolution 1325 (2000) represented an enormous step forward in the protection of women and highlighted the importance of their role in all aspects of United Nations peacekeeping. Nonetheless, while it has remained far from being a cure-all, resolution 1325 (2000) has contributed, along with resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009) and 1889 (2009), to improving the normative framework for preventing gender-based violence and for protecting women against that scourge. It should, however, be pointed out that, despite those praiseworthy efforts, persistent shortcomings have exposed thousands of women and girls to various types of barbaric abuse and atrocities. In fact, rape continues to be used as a weapon of war in certain conflict areas, and the ongoing existence of sexual and gender-based violence, even at the end of a conflict, represents an almost permanent threat to the security and health of that vulnerable group of the population. That is why the international community must firmly commit to vigorously combating impunity in order to guarantee the effective prevention of all forms of violence against women.

  • Country

    Nepal
  • Extracts

    We are ready and eager to collaborate with the international community for effective implementation of our national action plan. As enshrined in Nepal's Interim Constitution, one third of Parliament is represented by women. This political representation will be continued down to village-level elected bodies. Local peace committees are functioning in all districts with at least 33 per cent of participation of women, and are empowered to address post-conflict-related issues at the local level. Nepal has been implementing gender-based budgeting for some years, through which gender mainstreaming gets special attention in all development activities. We have introduced a policy of affirmative action in various areas, including the civil service, with a view to ensuring that women are placed at public sector decision-making levels. We are also committed to increasing the number of women in our army and police forces.

Reconstruction and Peacebuilding
  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    All of that reflects the efforts being made by the Government of Colombia to adopt policies designed to include women at all stages of peacekeeping and peacebuilding while eliminating discrimination against women and promoting their economic, political and social empowerment, as well as their more active participation in development, both in decisionmaking and in enjoying the benefits that development brings.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    As a member of the Commission on the Status of Women and of the Group of Friends of 1325, Colombia reaffirms its support for full implementation of that resolution. We stress the importance of coordinated and consistent support of the United Nations system for national initiatives aimed at building the capacity to address the security needs, recovery and development of women and girls in conflict and post-conflict.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Ensuring that women are represented and participate in decision-making forums, institutions and mechanisms concerned with preventing and resolving conflict and with peacebuilding; that they are included in peace agreement negotiations and implementation; and that enabling conditions for women peacemakers and peacekeepers are created requires clear guidelines and support on the part of the United Nations and national authorities. Member States and regional and sub-regional organizations should invest more in strengthening the capacity of women's organizations. Such organizations should be provided with support for their conflict-prevention and resolution efforts and consulted more on local women's peace initiatives.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The five-year plans formulated by the Government of India for economic development recognize the important role of women as agents of sustained socio-economic growth and change by incorporating proposals on gender empowerment. Women's empowerment is essential to promote overall sustainable development. That is also true in conflict situations. We believe that the participation of women in all stages of the peace process — conflict prevention, peace negotiations, peacekeeping and post-conflict reconstruction — is essential for lasting peace and security.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    Key aspects of post-conflict reconstruction, such as economic recovery, social cohesion and political legitimacy, all require the active engagement of women. Resolution 1325 (2000) was a seminal piece of international legislation in our efforts on women and peace and security. The United Nations, Member States and civil society have made steady and noticeable efforts in implementing the resolution. However, the results remain mixed, with important gaps remaining in fully realizing its provisions.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The United Nations is being asked to do more with regard to women and peace and security, including through the mainstreaming of the gender perspective in the United Nations system and United Nations peacekeeping missions. We commend the work of the Secretary-General in mainstreaming the gender perspective in the United Nations recruitment process. The number of women at the senior decision-making level and the participation of women in mission planning, peacekeeping operations and peacebuilding efforts have increased. Nonetheless, the numbers still remain very low.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    Women's potential as agents of change, skilfully reshaping and rebuilding communities affected by conflict, is an important resource to tap into. However, it is not always the case that they can be readily available for such a huge task. In post-conflict situations, the deficit in experience, skills, understanding and knowledge on women and peace issues is often a hindrance to enlisting a greater involvement of women. Overcoming the trauma they have had to endure can also be a factor working against women becoming active peacebuilding actors.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Indeed, inroads have been made in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), as highlighted in the Secretary-General's report (S/2011/598*). However, let us be clear that gaps remain in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), as well as glaring disparities pertaining to the role of women in preventive diplomacy, formal peace processes and mediation. We therefore welcome the institutional and policy frameworks elaborated in the Secretary-General's report, in particular his seven point action plan for gender-responsive peacebuilding, which seeks to establish standard operating procedures for gender issues in the United Nations, conflict resolution and peacebuilding architecture.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Based on its past experience, South Africa is conscious of the centrality of women as peacemakers and facilitators in political processes and peacebuilding initiatives, particularly at the grass-roots level. Women at all levels of society have a role to play in conflict prevention and peacebuilding as agents of change. In that regard, South African Women in Dialogue has been actively engaged with women's organizations in countries such as Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Sudan in sharing experiences and lessons learned with women in States emerging from conflict. South Africa continues to contribute to popularizing the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) through structures such as the Southern African Development Community, the African Union and the Pan-African Women's Organization. To that end, South Africa recently held the Progressive Women's Movement of South Africa Summit on Women, Peace and Security in May.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Indeed, in congratulating the three outstanding women who were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize this year, President Johnson-Sirleaf of Liberia, her compatriot Ms. Leymah Gbowee and Ms. Tawakkul Karman of Yemen, President Jacob Zuma underscored the important contribution that women continue to play in their ongoing struggle for women's rights, dignity, peace and development all over the world. The vast majority of women are not involved in creating wars, but they remain the primary victims of war and conflict. Long after the guns have ceased blazing, their children and families continue to suffer the devastating effects of the aftermath of conflict. Women are the ones left to pick up the pieces and to rebuild families and their communities.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    In post-conflict planning and budgeting, there should be targeted actions and sector-specific gender experts for all relevant areas, such as security sector reform and economic recovery. The Secretary-General's seven-point action plan on peacebuilding (see S/2010/466) provides detailed recommendations on that. We welcome the work done so far. However, much remains to be done, and we encourage the United Nations to implement all of the recommendations without delay. As donors, we commit to do our part both by supporting women's participation in post-conflict donor conferences and by directing funding for initiatives that contribute to gender equality.

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    I would like to conclude by stressing that promoting more effective political participation by women at the level of the African continent to make them effective agents in prevention and peacebuilding efforts requires a greater contribution from all regional, multilateral and even bilateral players. Setting up programmes devoted to capacity-building for women and young girls, including those aimed at their socioeconomic empowerment, are crucial, especially in the reconstruction and peacebuilding phase. We also believe that the various entities of the United Nations system and regional and international financial institutions, including the World Bank, must also play a dominant role in this area. We would like to express our full support for the draft presidential statement that will be adopted at the end of our debate.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    If we want to see tangible progress in this area, more needs to be done at the national, regional, and international levels. First, women and women's rights must be consistently included in peace talks. Women are formidable negotiators, mediators and peace-builders. But all too often they are denied access to negotiations at the highest level because of the lack of political will or commitment. A transparent and inclusive peace process involving representatives of every component of society, including women, is the most likely to succeed.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    Eleven years after the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), the Council has continued to make progress in providing guidelines on strengthening the protection of women in situations of armed conflict. To that end, in 2008, the Council adopted resolution 1820 (2008), which noted that attacks on women in armed conflicts continued to occur. On 16 December 2010, the Council adopted resolution 1960 (2010). One important aspect that has been highlighted is the need for increased participation by women in political processes, particularly in mediation and in peacekeeping and peacebuilding operations. In that respect, the meeting organized by UN-Women in the context of the sixty sixth session of the General Assembly on women and political participation takes on particular importance. My delegation feels that the meeting should be replicated at the regional, national and local levels.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    With regard to the peacebuilding process, Chile notes the work of the Peacebuilding Commission and the vision of gender equality that the Commission has brought to its work, in keeping with the resolutions that led to its creation. It is also noteworthy that the Peacebuilding Fund has allocated significant resources to incorporating the gender perspective in the projects it funds.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    The implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) is not the exclusive province of the Security Council or of the United Nations system; it is also incumbent upon the international community as a whole. In that respect, the formulation and development of a national action plan is crucial. Chile has had such a plan in place since 2009. By involving a broad swath of civil society in its development, and by incorporating the Secretary-General's earlier recommendations, we designed an integrated action plan that brings together, as effectively as possible, agencies charged with the prevention, management and resolution of conflicts, all with the comprehensive inclusion of a gender perspective.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    The adoption by the Security Council of resolution 1325 (2000) bears testimony to the progress made during the past decade in the area of women and peace and security. That landmark resolution has brought much-needed attention to the question of women's empowerment, which represents a priority for my country. While all the resolutions on women and peace and security are equally important, resolution 1325 (2000) serves as an umbrella resolution in addressing women's empowerment, their task as peacebuilders and their fragile position as victims of war.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    We call upon the Security Council to intensify its efforts in the fight against impunity and to provide strong and effective leadership in strengthening the rule of law, with the ultimate aim of eradicating this abhorrent behaviour. The Council should include sexual violence as a priority element in resolutions mandating its sanctions committees, and they should explicitly include sexual violence as a criterion for the designation of political and military leaders for targeted measures. Perpetrators of sexual violence, including commanders who commission or condone the use of sexual violence, should be held accountable. Furthermore, we encourage strengthening the coordination among United Nations agencies both at Headquarters and in the field, especially in monitoring and reporting on situations where parties to armed conflict engage in rape and other sexual violence as means of war.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    As a country with authentic experience in the field of conflict prevention and resolution, as well as mediation and peacebuilding, Croatia is actively contributing to the realization of the objective of the resolution during both times of conflict and times of peace. As a way of contributing to international peace and security, Croatia is increasingly taking part in peacekeeping operations, thereby informing
    our perception of the role of women in preserving peace as special and unique. The lack of women's empowerment poses a major setback to the full achievement of human rights and overall economic and political development and progress.

  • Speaker

    The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)
  • Extracts

    Those of us from the continent, which has suffered so many conflicts, know and understand the terrible impact of war. We also know that women and girls suffer disproportionately — indirectly and directly — as victims of violent conflict. We also know that unless women are key players in rebuilding their societies, including by playing key roles in negotiating peace agreements, national reconciliation and in re-launching economic recovery, such efforts will not succeed. We also know that gender equality and the empowerment of women are crosscutting issues for all development policies and, indeed, should be a cornerstone for all policies, including for peacemaking and peacebuilding.

  • Speaker

    The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)
  • Extracts

    The Economic and Social Council devoted its 2010 annual ministerial review last year to the internationally agreed development goals and commitments in regard to gender equality and the empowerment of women. The ministerial declaration adopted by the Council broke new ground in that, for the first time, an intergovernmental body highlighted a number of crosscutting issues where action was expected to positively enhance gender-related goals. These cross-cutting issues are also relevant with regard to the role of women in contributing to peacemaking and peacebuilding. I wish briefly to highlight some of these crosscutting issues, which are of particular relevance to this debate and call for a common approach by the United Nations system at the normative, programmatic and operational levels.

  • Speaker

    The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)
  • Extracts

    Fifthly, promoting the full integration of women into the formal economy is also particularly relevant in post-conflict recovery and peacebuilding contexts, where new opportunities should be offered to women as part of the dividends of peace and as a way to consolidate social peace. The development and security pillars of the Organization are strongly interconnected in this respect. Sixthly, ensuring that women and girls with disabilities are not subject to multiple and aggravated forms of discrimination. Women with war-related disabilities deserve particular attention and support. The coordinated involvement of humanitarian, development, health and protection actors should be promoted by our intergovernmental bodies in order to target this category of women and girls.

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    Although Ms. Bachelet aptly highlighted the modest progress made by Member States and the United Nations in advancing the agenda of resolution 1325 (2000), we must heed her warning that we are very far from sufficiently and systematically integrating women into the process of conflict prevention and peacebuilding. We believe that this is an auspicious moment in the history of the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). The draft presidential statement that is to be adopted today could not have come at a better time, coming as it does in the aftermath of the recognition by the Nobel Committee of the role and participation of the three eminent women in conflict resolution and peace processes in their respective communities. While congratulating President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, Ms. Leymah Gbowee and Ms. Tawakkul Karman for their groundbreaking achievement, we share the hope of the Nobel Committee that this recognition of the important place of women in the peace process, which the draft presidential statement echoes loudly, is a watershed moment and paradigm shift in the global effort to implement resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    Nigeria is also committed to fulfilling its obligations under the African Charter of Human and Peoples' Rights on the rights of women in Africa. As Ms. Bachelet has often said, the obstacles to women's political participation, which I believe have a direct bearing on their capacity to play an active role in preventive diplomacy and conflict prevention, are indeed enormous. Violence, poverty, lack of access to education and health care, and limited economic opportunities all combine to undermine the role of women and girls in conflict prevention, peace negotiations and peacebuilding. It is therefore necessary that we develop and take measures to address these inherent obstacles. Promoting women's equality and empowerment is, in our view, one of the best ways to address the root causes of conflict and therefore prevent such conflict. I envisage a presidential statement along those lines in the near future.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    Resolution 1325 (2000), adopted 11 years ago, represents a fundamental milestone, because ever since its adoption the issue of the role of women in peace and security has occupied an important place on the agenda of the Security Council. As a result, it has taken on an important and essential role in the achievement of international peace and security. The resolution has served as the point of departure for subsequent developments on this issue in the Security Council when it comes to ensuring the participation of women in peacekeeping and peacebuilding and, most especially, with regard to combating sexual violence against women and girls. For that reason, along with international human rights law and international humanitarian law, resolution 1325 (2000) and resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010) provide the international community with a normative framework for considering the needs of women in conflict and post-conflict situations.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    As we all clearly acknowledge today, women are decisive actors in every stage of long-term peacebuilding processes, which is why we concur with the Secretary-General on the need to encourage women's participation as an integral part of efforts to establish, maintain and build peace.

  • Country

    Sudan
  • Extracts

    My country has applied the principle of equal pay for equal work since 1967. Legislation and laws concerning women have been developed, especially in 2003, when a law was passed equalizing the age of retirement for men and women. With respect to the promotion of the rights of Sudanese women in the area of political participation, there has been a qualitative development in the form of the electoral law of 2008, which increased the percentage of participation by women to 25 per cent in the federal and State Parliaments and was fully implemented during the elections held in the country last year. Thus women constitute one quarter of the membership of the Sudanese Parliament, while the report before the Council (S/2011/598*) states in paragraph 23 that women make up 19 per cent of parliamentarians globally.

    Regarding the level of participation of Sudanese women in the civil service, which has reached 66 per cent, I wish to note by way of example that in the judiciary alone, there are 79 women judges. Many such judges eventually become Supreme Court judges. Sudanese women have held high diplomatic posts, and many of them serve as ambassadors to various countries. A large number of women are doctors and specialize in various fields of medicine. In addition, they have assumed leading posts in the armed forces, the police and the security forces.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    It is also important to recognize that there is now great awareness of the many types of violence inflicted on women in conflict, and that significant attempts have been made to address them. Since the primary victims of armed conflict are women, along with children and the elderly, it is important that they take on a key role in peacekeeping and peacebuilding and, even more urgently, in the process of prevention, to which it is never too late to devote special attention.

  • Country

    Kenya
  • Extracts

    My delegation believes that women's participation enhances social harmony and inclusivity and reduces the chances of conflict. Women, therefore, should participate as full partners in governance institutions. The new Kenya Constitution has entrenched women's participation in all aspects of Kenya's governance structures and social life in general. Furthermore, the national policy on gender and development has set up an ambitious agenda aimed at integrating women into the mainstream of decision- making processes through regulatory and institutional reform.

    These efforts have begun to bear fruit. Kenya's next Parliament will have 48 and 16 seats reserved for women in the National Assembly and the Senate, respectively, in addition to those who will be competitively elected in the various constituencies. Furthermore, in all cases where special interests are represented in the legislature, the seats will be divided equally between men and women. Currently, women serve as members of constitutional commissions, such as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the Commission on the Implementation of the Constitution and the Public Service Commission, to name just a few. Additionally, the top two positions of any public body cannot be held by people of the same gender, thus giving an equal chance to women to either lead or eventually ascend to the top leadership positions of all public institutions.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    More than a decade has passed since the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000). Throughout that period, the United Nations system, regional organizations, Member States and civil society have made significant efforts to adapt the resolution to local settings through a wide spectrum of measures and initiatives. Progress has been made in terms of discourse and evolving practice on the participation of women in conflict prevention, resolution and peacebuilding, and awareness has increased of the threat that sexual violence constitutes to peace and security.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    Secondly, the meaningful participation of women in decision-making forums, institutions and mechanisms related to conflict resolution and peacebuilding is essential, not only for peace but also for sustainable development and long-term security. Such participation should be treated as a requirement for building a solid and genuine democracy, which cannot be fully achieved unless the inequalities affecting half of the population are adequately addressed.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    Today, women's community peace huts in counties around the country are venues for conflict mediation and resolution. They also serve as safe havens for women escaping domestic violence and as counselling centres for survivors of sexual and gender- based violence. In the peace huts, women address child support issues and work with local police to identify suspects who have committed crimes against women, so as to ensure their arrest and interrogation. Women also monitor the early warning signs of conflict and lead peaceful demonstrations on issues that affect their well-being.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    Since the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), discussions have revealed many examples of women's effective contribution to conflict prevention, peace processes and peacebuilding in the various regions of the world. Women bear the consequences of conflict and are thus well placed to contribute to solutions. Having reached this realization, our common challenge is to find creative means to institutionalize this role at the national and international levels. Women must be capacitated and strategically positioned to play their rightful role.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    Through the adoption by the Security Council of resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions, the United Nations has been able to develop, integrate and fine-tune the tools available to it to address a gender perspective in a multidimensional manner, by recognizing the importance of women's active participation in the various stages of conflict prevention and resolution, as well as in peacekeeping, reconstruction and peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    We welcome in particular the establishment of UN-Women, the agency that lies at the heart of the gender architecture of the Organization, as it coordinates all efforts undertaken in this field. We welcome also the inclusion of specific indicators in the reports of the Secretary-General, as is the case in the report before us today (S/2011/598*), as well as the seven-point action plan. Unfortunately, however, as a result of the unequal implementation of resolutions dealing with the gender architecture, there exist significant gaps. One of the clearest examples of this is the persistence of sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict situations.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    We are also concerned about the low level of participation by women in peace negotiations. The exclusion of women and the lack of experts in gender matters in negotiations perpetuate inequality. As is indicated in the current report of the Secretary-General, issues related to women tend to be addressed at the later stages of conflict prevention and mediation. The Nobel Peace Prize that was awarded to outstanding women in this field this year undoubtedly sends a positive message, but it is nonetheless insufficient.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    The effective implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), on women and peace and security, is a priority for France, which actively worked for its adoption, just as we have worked to strengthen awareness of this issue at the European Union, especially during our 2008 presidency of the Union. Last year, France adopted a national plan of action on the implementation of the resolution. In particular, it aims at prioritizing, at the international level, the protection of women against all forms of violence and promoting respect for their basic rights, as well as their equal participation in decision-making processes in the context of peacebuilding, reconstruction and development.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    France has undertaken commitments in the context of its plan of action to strengthen women's direct participation in reconstruction efforts and the decision making process, namely, by focusing priority on access to leadership positions. In particular, France is implementing several cooperation programmes, in partnership with UN-Women, aimed at strengthening women's participation in the decision-making process, improving their access to, and participation in, the justice sector. We are doing that by relying on civil society organizations and, in particular, women's groups, which I would like here to commend. Those programmes are being carried out in Africa and the Arab world, as well as in Afghanistan. Moreover, France is developing programmes intended to bolster the participation of women in peacekeeping operations. Our plan of action also includes initiatives to improve awareness of the need for respect for the rights of women in the context of training programmes, which is another important element in the implementation of the resolution on women, peace and security.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    We are pleased to note that resolution 1325 (2000) has continued to open new perspectives of awareness about women's role in peace negotiations, humanitarian planning, peacekeeping operations, post- conflict peacebuilding and governance. Even so, there is a wide gap between aspirations and the reality on the ground. The report of the Secretary-General on women and peace and security (S/2011/598*) provides a strategic road map for the United Nations, together with national, regional and international stakeholders.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    In addition, there must be dedicated budgets, targets, timelines and indicators aligned to national peacebuilding plans, overall national defence and security strategies or poverty reduction programmes. Focus in the post-conflict recovery phase must ensure that women's needs and rights are consistently addressed. My delegation supports the Secretary-General's recommendation that at least 15 per cent of United Nations funds for peacebuilding be dedicated to projects that address the specific needs of women and girls, advance gender equality and empower women. Adequate financing is vital to ensuring resources for gender training and support for non-governmental organizations and local groups that focus on issues of food security, nutrition, health and HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, education, and the rehabilitation and reintegration of women affected by war.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Resolution 1325 (2000) is relevant to the implementation of Lithuania's foreign, security and development cooperation policy objectives, as well as our participation in international peacebuilding and peacekeeping missions. Lithuania was one of 38 Member States that contributed to the Secretary-General's report on women and peace and security (S/2011/598*).
  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    The improvement of the status of women, in particular in countries with identified patterns of conflictrelated sexual violence, starts with addressing the very basic issues involved in enabling women to live a more decent life. The experience of Lithuania and other partner countries in Afghanistan, where Lithuania is leading a provincial reconstruction team, shows that women's empowerment and full participation at all levels of economic, political and social life are key not only to peace and security but also to poverty reduction, economic recovery and sustainable development. To cite but two examples, one project aims at consulting local medics and patients on midwifery and other women's health- related questions at the provincial hospital. Another important development project for local women and their organizations was dedicated to strengthening the capacity of the provincial administration and local non-governmental organizations to prepare and implement their own projects. Finally, Lithuania calls on the Security Council to use its authority to ensure that all resolutions, including those on mission mandates and their renewal, integrate and advance the women and peace and security agenda.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    The decision of the Nobel Prize Committee to award the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize to three women in recognition "for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women's rights to full participation in peace-building work" is a much deserved recognition of women's significant contribution to peacebuilding and democracy. It will undoubtedly send a powerful message to women around the world to engage in determining the future of their countries.
  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    Indeed, while acknowledging that important progress has been accomplished in the implementation of resolution 1325 and the subsequent resolutions on Women Peace and Security, we need to recognize that significant challenges still remain: women are still underrepresented at the several levels of peacekeeping and peacebuilding efforts as they are inadequately represented in formal peace negotiations. The exclusion of women from peace talks and peacebuilding efforts often means that insufficient attention is paid to addressing gender disparities and women's needs and concerns in the post conflict phase, thus reinforcing a circle of inequality and marginalization.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    Women have indeed a crucial role to play in rebuilding war torn societies and in reserving social cohesion. They did it in Europe during and after two World Wars, they did it in South America and they did it in Africa in countries divided by civilian strive. They still do it on a daily basis in several countries tormented by conflict. What is essential is to guarantee that women are included in peace processes and to ensure that their perspectives, direct knowledge of the concrete situation and concerns are taken into account as important contributions to the re-shaping of torn societies in post –conflict situations and in peacebuilding efforts.
  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    The history of resolution 1325 (2000), more than ten years of it, has clearly confirmed in practice the key role and significance of this instrument for advancing the role of women in conflict prevention and resolution and in post-conflict reconstruction and also in protecting women during conflicts. In that regard we express how pleased we are that this year the issue of women's participation in preventive diplomacy is given priority attention in the Council's presidential statement.

  • Country

    Ukraine
  • Extracts

    The focus of today's debate on the participation and role of women in conflict prevention and mediation could not be more timely. Ukraine has always stressed the need for the widest possible use of the potential of women in the spheres of preventive diplomacy, peacekeeping and peacebuilding. We believe that there is still much to be done to redress the current underrepresentation of women in decision- making with regard to conflict resolution so as to make their voice heard loud and clear in peace negotiations. In that context, we welcome the adoption of the first-ever resolution on “Strengthening the role of mediation in the peaceful settlement of disputes and conflict prevention and resolution” (General Assembly resolution 65/283). In that document, all Member States resolved to promote the equal, full and effective participation of women at all levels of the peaceful settlement of disputes, conflict prevention and resolution, as well as to provide adequate gender expertise for all mediators and their teams.

  • Country

    Ukraine
  • Extracts

    The importance of women's participation in peacebuilding can hardly be overestimated. The issue is one of the priorities of Ukraine as a member of the Organizational Committee of the Peacebuilding Commission (PBC) and one of it current Vice-Chairs. We see a great deal of merit in strengthening collaboration between the PBC and UN-Women in this field. From that perspective, Ukraine was one of the initiators of the first-ever joint high-level meeting of those bodies aimed at promoting advocacy for women's participation in peacebuilding, in line with the Secretary-General's thematic report.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    The Arab Spring has shown that the threats to security and to women and girls in particular are changing constantly. In our work on Women, Peace and Security we must be flexible enough to respond to new threats and challenges as they emerge. There are sweeping and positive social and economic trends at work. This Council needs to show that we are responsive to these trends. On this, as on other issues, we should demonstrate that we are on the right side of history. In particular, we must ensure that new governing structures that emerge in the aftermath of conflict do not undermine women's roles and participation in society, and that the same opportunities are available to men and women.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    In the Prevention Pillar, the U.S. has developed multiple programs that seek to address the root causes of conflict, including a $26 million annual Reconciliation Program that supports innovative programming in conflict-affected countries and includes gender analysis. In the Relief and Recovery Pillar, the U.S. has provided significant funding to improve water and sanitation in situations in which women's safety and security are at risk.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    As the President's concept note (S/2011/654) rightly points out, many gaps and challenges remain on the road to translating words into action and ensuring the full participation of women in all stages of conflict prevention, conflict resolution and peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    The effective representation and full involvement of women in peace processes, in transitional governments and in political life is a prerequisite for addressing their specific needs and concerns and for ensuring that their rights are adequately reflected in State structures, peace agreements, law enforcement processes, et cetera. One half of the population cannot claim to represent the other half. Women need to represent themselves.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    The United Nations and its Member States need to further increase the number of women in peacekeeping operations and political missions in order to ensure gender expertise in the planning of missions and in all mediation efforts, and to enhance the appointment of women to senior leadership positions. The Secretary-General's seven-point action plan on women's participation in peacebuilding (see S/2010/466) contains important commitments in that regard, and we encourage the United Nations system to take them forward.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    However, as has so often been emphasised, a focus on the way that conflict can victimise women should not lead us to obscure the role that women can play as agents of conflict resolution and recovery – or in the words of the Nobel Committee, “to realise the great potential for democracy and peace that women can represent”.
    More than simply a question of the right of women to participate in peace-making or peacebuilding - which of course it is – the report of the Secretary-General acknowledges what women bring to the table, and what their absence implies. Efforts at peace that accord women prominent and active roles have a better chance of successfully addressing key postconflict issues. The corollary is equally clear: "exclusion of women and a lack of gender expertise in negotiations leads to irreversible setbacks for women's rights... women's engagement in post-conflict governance and women's access to economic opportunity"
  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    And not just the inclusion of women negotiators, but more broadly a gender perspective, so that gender is established as a thread running through all major peace-building issues, rather than being parked on its own as a discrete topic. Gender is not a box to be ticked, a nod to political correctness. Its place is not at the end of a long list – it is a concern which should condition the approach from start to finish. The promise and potential of women peace-builders was evident to a delegation of women Ambassadors, including Ireland's Ambassador to the African Union, that paid a visit to Sudan earlier this year and met with a cross-section of women peace-builders, legislators and IDPs. The delegation's report noted the determination of women to play a full role in conflict prevention efforts and recommended that international organisations take on more responsibility for implementing women, peace and security priorities.
  • Country

    Kyrgyzstan
  • Extracts

    Following the inter-ethnic conflict in southern Kyrgyzstan in 2010, special importance was given to supporting female initiatives in the area of conflict resolution, peacebuilding and post-conflict reconstruction. In that difficult time, women activists joined together to form women's peacekeeping networks in order to put an end to conflict and violence and to prevent a recurrence of the tragic events.

    My country notes the timely and swift reaction of the United Nations Peacebuilding Fund, which funded projects to promote national reconciliation and post- conflict reconstruction. Today, the women's peacekeeping network includes 20 local women's peace committees and serves as the link between local communities and the central Government.
    Kyrgyzstan believes that the key role in coordinating agreed measures on women's participation in conflict prevention and peacebuilding efforts should be played by the new entity UN-Women. Through close partnerships with UN-Women, UNICEF, the United Nations Development Programme and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, in May the network of Kyrgyzstan women peacekeepers began to implement 11 projects aimed at fostering inter-ethnic harmony and ensuring peace in post-conflict areas of Kyrgyzstan. We also consider it necessary to more actively promote that component in the action strategy of the United Nations Regional Centre for Preventive Diplomacy for Central Asia.
  • Country

    Kyrgyzstan
  • Extracts

    Preventive actions in post-conflict countries, including comprehensive reform of judicial and law enforcement systems, are important as the only way to ensure the rule of law and better protection of the rights of women, particularly in protecting them from violence and increasing their participation in the law enforcement sector. My country believes that positive experience in that area must be mainstreamed and disseminated.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    Although women's participation in Tunisia's recent elections has not lived up to all expectations, we are confident that Tunisian women will be able to assume, at all levels and in all political and economic institutions, their responsibilities in the work of building their country, and that they will thereby set an example for other countries in the region and around the world. We urge Libyan leaders to grant women their full and proper place in the construction of the new Libya. We express our solidarity with the women of Yemen and Syria, who continue to fight against oppression and for their rights to freedom and democracy.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    Allow me, in my capacity as Chair of the Guinea configuration of the Peacebuilding Commission, to highlight the role that Guinean women must play in the establishment of democracy in Guinea, and specifically in national reconciliation efforts in their country, which was wounded by decades of authoritarian rule and military dictatorship. The Peacebuilding Commission is striving to assist Guinea to fully integrate women into all political processes and into economic and social life. In that context, I encourage the Secretary-General to push the entire United Nations system to pursue, with even stronger determination, the implementation of his seven-point action plan on the role of women in peacebuilding. In his report on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) under consideration, the Secretary-General outlines a few areas of progress, but he also acknowledges that progress is slow in an area of particular interest for today's debate — the participation of women in mediation efforts — and in the area of women's economic integration. At this stage, we do not have sufficient data to measure progress towards the goal of allocating 15 per cent of all United Nations-managed funds in support of peacebuilding to gender equality and women's empowerment.

  • Country

    Solomon Is.
  • Extracts

    As a country emerging from conflict, we have put in place a number of peace and security initiatives. We have adopted traditional and external mechanisms. We have borrowed the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission model, which has a gender chapter to it. I am pleased to say that during its work it has accumulated data relevant to resolution 1325 (2000) that we will feed into our national policy framework when the Commission's mandate comes to a natural end next year.

  • Country

    Solomon Is.
  • Extracts

    My delegation is mindful of the deep gaps within resolution 1325 (2000), as it deals merely with peace and security, not development. Our reading of the resolution is that it engages women becoming agents of change in conflict prevention, management and peacebuilding, acting as fire-fighters putting out fires without looking at the causes of conflict. Peace and security, however, can be sustained by having a sustainable development context to them.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    My country drew up an action plan on women, peace and security in 2007, which it has since updated twice. The effective implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions requires a significant cooperation effort, with the participation of six ministries, as well as constant and fluid contacts with civil society organizations, involved throughout the process, including the practical implementation of concrete actions. An action programme on women and peacebuilding, applicable to post-conflict situations in a cross-cutting way, is also included in the master plan for Spanish cooperation, in the context of the strategy on gender and development.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    We must expand the role of women everywhere. We need women to play a greater role in preventive diplomacy, mediation and peacekeeping. We need women to play a greater role in post-conflict reconstruction and institution-building, and we need a greater role for women in sustainable development and as agents for social transformation. The integral link between peace, security, gender equality and development is evident. This interaction renders women's participation in peace processes and sustainable development mutually reinforcing. The issue of women's security should therefore be addressed through holistic methodologies rather than ad hoc solutions. In that regard, while we should put gender equality and the empowerment of women at the core of our efforts, we should further encourage and support their participation in the work of peace, including post-conflict recovery efforts and the sustainable development process.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Secondly, ensuring the participation of women in conflict resolution and prevention and in rehabilitation and reconstruction is an important part of the efforts to implement resolution 1325 (2000). China supports a bigger role for women in good offices and dispute mediation. We hope the Secretary-General will appoint more female special representatives and special envoys, and we hope to see greater participation by women in United Nations good offices and mediation concerning major international and regional hotspots.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Thirdly, in conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction, the national ownership of the government and people concerned must be respected. The international community can provide constructive help, but it must adhere to the United Nations Charter and the principle of non-interference in internal affairs. In safeguarding the rights and interests of women and enhancing their role in peace and security, specific national conditions and historical and cultural differences must be fully taken into account. A uniform approach is not desirable.

  • Country

    Netherlands
  • Extracts

    Accordingly, it is not surprising that the Netherlands continues to emphasize that the local men, and especially women, living the daily reality of a conflict are the key stakeholders in any intervention. Individual local women and men, women's organizations and women's movements are the real drivers of durable change. Concretely, this means that the second resolution 1325 (2000) national action plan emanates from a demand-driven approach. This plan is about the women, be it at the community or national level, who have the courage to step up and become leaders and to play their part in conflict mediation, resolution and reconstruction. Thus our national action plan is created to support the needs of those strong, knowledgeable women and their movements. We believe they know best what to do in their situation and in the context of their culture. We are on the eve of a new decade of promoting women, peace and security. Together we are responsible for implementing our joint commitments now.

  • Country

    Senegal
  • Extracts

    While welcoming the zero tolerance policy on sexual violence of the Secretary-General, we must, in addition, insist on the need to bolster the role of women in conflict-prevention and resolution. Nevertheless, the poor results in that area have undoubtedly been due to the continuing low participation of women in the drafting of implementation strategies. I consider it crucial, therefore, to foster women's participation by reserving a key role for them in conflict-prevention policies, as well as policies on peacekeeping, peacebuilding and social and economic recovery. In that context, there must be a special focus on women's empowerment, which will require significant investment in education, training and maternal health.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    During his recent visit to Tripoli, Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs the Honourable John Baird met with Libyan women's groups to discuss the important role that women's leadership will play in the new Libya and its democratic institutions. The Minister urged the new government of Libya to ensure the participation of women in decision-making during Libya's transition. Libya is an example of an environment in which barriers to women's access to peace processes and to reconstruction efforts will need to be addressed by all those involved.

  • Country

    Nepal
  • Extracts

    Resolution 1325 (2000) brought to the fore the importance of women as peacemakers and peacebuilders. The resolution was a historic shift from the traditional perspective, which saw women as passive recipients of the suffering produced by conflict. It rightly stressed the role of women as active participants with important and indispensable parts to play in peacemaking and peacebuilding. The resolution rightly urged Member States to mainstream the gender perspective by ensuring an increased representation of women at all decision-making levels in the areas of the prevention, management and resolution of conflict, post-conflict reconstruction and institution-building. On the eleventh anniversary of the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), it is high time to take stock of our achievements, identify challenges and share experiences of successes and difficulties to ensure an enhanced level of effort and support for the effective implementation of the resolution. There have been many notable efforts in a broad range of areas by Member States, the United Nations system, and civil society organizations towards the resolution's implementation. Yet there are areas where our concerted efforts are needed. Countries emerging from conflict are in need of genuine partnership and cooperation from the international community to fill the gaps in the financial resources and human and technical expertise needed to rebuild their societies. The lofty goals and vision of resolution 1325 (2000) will remain unfulfilled if countries coming out of conflict are left without adequate financial and human resources and capacity-building.

  • Country

    Maldives
  • Extracts

    Maldives has expressed support for Libya's National Transitional Council. With its current transition from conflict to creating a stable Government, we urge the National Transitional Council to stay mindful of the specific needs of women and its obligations towards them. That includes everything from disarmament and reconciliation to women's participation and representation. The path towards democracy is never easy, and women are often the first to be forgotten.

Implementation
  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    Colombia appreciates the important role that is given in this report to promoting cooperation mechanisms, constructive dialogue and effective support for efforts being made in different countries, as well as the contributions from the General Assembly aimed at strengthening the national capacities of States in preventing and addressing all forms of violence against women.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    We thank Ms. Michelle Bachelet, Under-Secretary-General for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women, for her briefing and for the contributions of UN-Women, which help to strengthen coordination and cooperation in the implementation of mandates relevant to women, peace and security. I assure Ms. Bachelet of our support as she fulfils her important mandate.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    We agree with the Secretary-General that UN-Women constitutes the cornerstone for articulating the mandates of the United Nations system in promoting gender equality and the empowerment of women. In this context, we emphasize the role that broad and inclusive intergovernmental consultations have in evaluating the gender architecture and the advancement of women, as well as the agreements between States on models and practices adopted in that area. All of that is an essential element for progress in improving national capacity to generate greater participation of women in conflict prevention and mediation.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    We also emphasize the importance of the reference in the Secretary-General's report to relief and recovery, as well as the actions being taken with regard to gender mainstreaming in the post-conflict phase, including job creation, education policies, life skills training, opportunities and support for children, access to basic services in health, education and legal support, and the provision of basic public services, such as water and sanitation. We emphasize that this represents an enormous challenge for States.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    With regard to participation, I should also like to mention initiatives such as the creation of women's community councils, indigenous women's regional laboratories and community radio programming boards. These are tools designed to promote the involvement of women in public policies, support leaders to advance the implementation of such policies, sustain a dialogue with this sector and with women's social organizations, and promote participatory processes at regional, departmental and municipal levels.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    Our priority is the incorporation of gender perspectives into our major national policies, including development plans, strategies for poverty eradication and the promotion of employment and entrepreneurial culture, among others. We place particular emphasis on action related to protecting women against all forms of violence, as well as for protecting those in particularly vulnerable situations, such as indigenous women, migrant women, trafficked women and girls, and women in rural areas, among others.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    As a member of the Commission on the Status of Women and of the Group of Friends of 1325, Colombia reaffirms its support for full implementation of that resolution. We stress the importance of coordinated and consistent support of the United Nations system for national initiatives aimed at building the capacity to address the security needs, recovery and development of women and girls in conflict and post-conflict.

  • Country

    Colombia
  • Extracts

    Finally, we would like to reiterate that approaches to human rights that focus exclusively in monitoring mechanisms do not contribute to achieving sustainable solutions, unlike mechanisms for cooperation, constructive dialogue and effective support for countries,which do indeed genuinely contribute to effective solutions.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    The commemoration of the tenth anniversary of resolution 1325 (2000) last year resulted in a number of renewed commitments and achievements on the part of Member States in implementing that resolution and others on women and peace and security. This year has also seen numerous actions within the United Nations and by Member States in joint efforts to implement the resolution and advance women's participation in peace and security, with particular emphasis on preventive diplomacy, mediation efforts, conflict prevention and peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    We welcome the report before us (S/2011/598*). The analysis of indicators it contains should provide valuable benchmarks for further planning and act as a road map. We also welcome the creation of the strategic results framework as an important tool for advancing implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and all other relevant resolutions on women and peace and security. Its main objectives include increasing consistency in decision-making processes among different United Nations bodies within their respective mandates and in capacity-building and cooperation with Member States, regional organizations and other partners, such as civil society.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Since the creation of UN-Women, greater coordination and coherence in policy and programming for women and girls are evident. We therefore consider that briefings of the Under-Secretary-General and the Executive Director of UN-Women should continue so as to facilitate a concerted and coordinated United Nations approach.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Ensuring that women are represented and participate in decision-making forums, institutions and mechanisms concerned with preventing and resolving conflict and with peacebuilding; that they are included in peace agreement negotiations and implementation; and that enabling conditions for women peacemakers and peacekeepers are created requires clear guidelines and support on the part of the United Nations and national authorities. Member States and regional and sub-regional organizations should invest more in strengthening the capacity of women's organizations. Such organizations should be provided with support for their conflict-prevention and resolution efforts and consulted more on local women's peace initiatives.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    We believe that countries should work on adopting national action plans or strategies in order to integrate issues of woman and peace and security, and gender issues, into their national policies and create a broader basis for implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). In that regard, it is also important to increase State institutions and services' knowledge and capacity in order to implement the resolution and collaborate effectively with international organizations and civil society. Here, I recall that Bosnia and Herzegovina has adopted both a national action plan for the resolution's implementation and a gender action plan. Those two documents are crucial to streamlining activities related to the woman and peace and security agenda in relevant sectors and to accelerating the resolution's implementation in our country.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    The role of the United Nations is to support Member States in this multifaceted process. It is important to create useful guidelines adapted to specific country situations, and to support the development of activities related to women and peace and security in the context of existing international obligations, rooted in national legislation.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    The use of indicators can contribute to the efficient and effective monitoring and reporting of results and data collection and to identifying gaps or obstacles during this process in a coordinated manner. This is particularly important when we consider that successful implementation depends on the ability to clearly and distinctly measure the progress of our joint endeavours in the area of women and peace and security.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Finally, Bosnia and Herzegovina firmly believes that there can be no lasting peace and security without the full participation of women in every aspect and at every stage of peacekeeping and peacebuilding, as well as in conflict-prevention activities. We therefore remain committed to expanding our support for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), other relevant resolutions, and future efforts of the Security Council on this issue.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The five-year plans formulated by the Government of India for economic development recognize the important role of women as agents of sustained socio-economic growth and change by incorporating proposals on gender empowerment. Women's empowerment is essential to promote overall sustainable development. That is also true in conflict situations. We believe that the participation of women in all stages of the peace process — conflict prevention, peace negotiations, peacekeeping and post-conflict reconstruction — is essential for lasting peace and security.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    Key aspects of post-conflict reconstruction, such as economic recovery, social cohesion and political legitimacy, all require the active engagement of women. Resolution 1325 (2000) was a seminal piece of international legislation in our efforts on women and peace and security. The United Nations, Member States and civil society have made steady and noticeable efforts in implementing the resolution. However, the results remain mixed, with important gaps remaining in fully realizing its provisions.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The United Nations system has come up with a comprehensive set of indicators to assess progress in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). We have certainly taken note of those indicators. We believe that such indicators and benchmarks need to be further discussed and conceptually developed as part of broader intergovernmental consultations before their eventual adoption. One must also be cognizant of the difficulty in obtaining credible and verifiable data, in particular from conflict situations.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The United Nations is being asked to do more with regard to women and peace and security, including through the mainstreaming of the gender perspective in the United Nations system and United Nations peacekeeping missions. We commend the work of the Secretary-General in mainstreaming the gender perspective in the United Nations recruitment process. The number of women at the senior decision-making level and the participation of women in mission planning, peacekeeping operations and peacebuilding efforts have increased. Nonetheless, the numbers still remain very low.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    As the Secretary-General's report itself points out, the United Nations presence in conflict and post conflict situations — field missions and country teams — must achieve greater coherence and coordination in addressing women and peace and security issues, including through the timely provision of targeted gender expertise

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The appointments of a Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict and a number of women special envoys are also positive developments. It is important that special representatives work in a coordinated manner among themselves and with other United Nations bodies. That is not only to ensure optimal utilization of resources and avoidance of duplication but also to promote greater coherence.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    We welcome the efforts of UN-Women to significantly boost United Nations action on the empowerment of women and gender equality, including in the area of women and peace and security. Its efforts need to be supported by all in the United Nations system and by the Member States. The Council, for its part, must make available the resources that are required to implement those mandates.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    We agree with all those who support increased deployment of female military and police personnel in United Nations peacekeeping operations and the provision to all military and police personnel of appropriate training to effectively discharge their responsibilities. India was the first country to deploy an all-female peacekeeping unit, 100 troops in Liberia in 2007. We have offered to contribute more such units. India is the largest contributor of troops in United Nations history. We are very proud of the exemplary record of our peacekeepers, both men and women, in the protection of women, children and the needy in conflict situations.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The promotion and protection of the human rights of women and girls in armed conflict continue to pose a pressing challenge. The Council has in previous resolutions recognized the specific vulnerability of women during conflicts and that they bear a disproportionate brunt of armed conflict, even though they are in most cases not directly engaged in combat. There should be zero tolerance for gender-based violence, and incidents of gender-based violence must be unequivocally condemned. All cases of gender based violence in an armed conflict, whether perpetrated by parties to the conflict, peacekeeping personnel or humanitarian actors, must be promptly investigated and the perpetrators prosecuted.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The international community must take all necessary steps to ensure the security of women and children. We also see civil society and local communities as valued partners in this endeavour, and we look forward to working with them to take this agenda forward. In conclusion, let me reaffirm India's commitment to positively contributing to United Nations efforts in protecting vulnerable sectors, including women and children, in conflict and post-conflict situations. I also call upon the international community to enhance cooperation by providing resources and sharing experience and expertise to build capacity in this area.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    The adoption of resolution 1325 (2000) was hailed as a landmark and groundbreaking resolution. For the first time, the importance of women's full participation in conflict prevention, conflict resolution and peacebuilding at all levels was recognized. Since then, the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and its sister resolutions have paved the way for the mainstreaming of the gender perspective in United Nations peacekeeping operations and missions worldwide. In a similar vein, the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, which also addresses women and armed conflict, should continue to be implemented. Those various international frameworks on women are complementary and mutually reinforce our efforts to protect the rights of women in conflict situations.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    Women's potential as agents of change, skilfully reshaping and rebuilding communities affected by conflict, is an important resource to tap into. However, it is not always the case that they can be readily available for such a huge task. In post-conflict situations, the deficit in experience, skills, understanding and knowledge on women and peace issues is often a hindrance to enlisting a greater involvement of women. Overcoming the trauma they have had to endure can also be a factor working against women becoming active peacebuilding actors.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    Taking those challenges into account, an important aspect of realizing the aims of resolution 1325 (2000) is fostering capacity-building for grass- roots movements and organizations established in conflict and post-conflict times. Recognizing that post- conflict capacity-building is not an overnight endeavour, the scope and time frame for developing women's capacity should be long-term.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    To conclude, let me reiterate that the responsibility to implement relevant Security Council resolutions on enhancing women's participation in peace processes, including the protection of women, rests primarily with individual Governments. Through this debate, we can once again reaffirm our readiness to promote the participation of women in peace processes, including within the framework of Security Council resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    We hope and expect that the adoption of a set of global indicators to track implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) (see S/2010/498, annex) at the conclusion of the tenth anniversary debate last year (S/PV.6411), will help the Council to re-energize and strategize its efforts in an effective manner. We hope that that the set of indicators can help to resolve the bottlenecks that have contributed to the delays in implementation of the activities that the indicators are designed to measure.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    We are committed to gender equality and the empowerment of women. We are currently in the process of drafting a national action plan on resolution 1325 (2000). Efforts are already under way to promote that resolution and to raise awareness of gender-based violence, human rights and peacebuilding through the training of women's groups, survivors of violence, men and youth. Community mediators, 50 per cent of whom are women, have been trained to assist in situations involving local conflict. Involving women at the outset has had an exponentially beneficial effect in Timor- Leste and has laid the foundation for women's participation and inclusion, not only in Government, but also across all sectors. We are proud to note that women's representation in our Parliament is at 29 per cent, and we have set a goal to reach 35 per cent representation by 2015. The recently adopted electoral law requires that every third candidate on party lists be a woman, thereby ensuring that this target will be reached.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    UN-Women, together with international partners, has provided great support to our efforts to promote gender equality and the empowerment of women. As a member of the Executive Board of UN-Women, we are steadfast in our support of the new entity and are confident of the value of its work on the advancement of women. That commitment is further reflected in our three-year contribution to the core budget of UN-Women.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    It is not possible to create a legitimate and durable post-conflict political system that does not include the full and equal participation of women in decision-making. The role of women in economic development must be recognized in order to grow a post-conflict economy. Women, after all, are most likely to be providing direct support to children and extended kinship networks. Bringing the voice of women to the forefront of conflict prevention and mediation work will therefore help build more resilient communities and a more sustainable peace. That is key to the Security Council's work.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    Recent years have seen several institutional developments to better integrate these matters into the work of the Security Council and the United Nations. The establishment of UN-Women was a landmark development. We welcome its initial work to take forward the implementation of all the resolutions on women and peace and security. But more can be done. We encourage the Security Council to receive regular briefings from Michelle Bachelet, Under-Secretary-General and Executive Director of UN-Women, and Margot Wallström, the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict. We welcome the reference in today's presidential statement (S/PRST/2011/20) to briefings by Ms. Bachelet. We hope that both she and Ms. Wallström can brief the Security Council at their initiative and when they regard elements of the women and peace and security agenda as being relevant to country-specific Security Council deliberations.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    We also encourage the United Nations to include relevant elements of the women and peace and security agenda in all country- and mandate-specific reports to be considered by the Security Council.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    In our own Asia-Pacific region we have seen great improvements in women's capacity to engage in peace processes that affect them. That is also a key focus of our own aid programme in the region. In Indonesia and Nepal, we have supported women mediators, negotiators and advisers to identify and implement strategies for improving women's participation in peace processes. That important work continues to document best practices related to women and peacemaking in the Asia-Pacific region.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    The United Nations Development Programme network of peace advocates, N-PEACE, is also undertaking important work in Timor-Leste, Sri Lanka, Indonesia and Nepal. Earlier this month, N-PEACE launched an interactive internet portal to connect peace advocates within and across countries with experts in the field. That facilitates the sharing of strategies to promote gender equality and women's empowerment in conflict and post-conflict situations.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    For example, FemLINKPacific leads a community and media policy network on women, peace and security in Fiji, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Bougainville in Papua New Guinea. Through the production of a wide range of media initiatives, they are empowering women across the Pacific to engage with decision makers at all levels on issues that affect them.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    South Africa welcomes the convening of this important meeting. The adoption of the historic resolution 1325 (2000) 11 years ago was a significant milestone in the recognition of the role that women can play in the maintenance of international peace and security, particularly in decision-making processes relating to conflict prevention and resolution. In light of that achievement, South Africa is encouraged by the various frameworks that have been created to ensure the implementation of that resolution, in particular the creation of UN-Women under the leadership of Ms. Michele Bachelet.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Those positive developments are pivotal for advancing the agenda of women, peace and security. It will allow for this important issue to be consistently placed at the top of the agenda of the United Nations system, and lead to increased coordination in policy programming for women and girls within the United Nations system.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Indeed, inroads have been made in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), as highlighted in the Secretary-General's report (S/2011/598*). However, let us be clear that gaps remain in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), as well as glaring disparities pertaining to the role of women in preventive diplomacy, formal peace processes and mediation. We therefore welcome the institutional and policy frameworks elaborated in the Secretary-General's report, in particular his seven point action plan for gender-responsive peacebuilding, which seeks to establish standard operating procedures for gender issues in the United Nations, conflict resolution and peacebuilding architecture.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    We further welcome the practical recommendations and the strategic results framework outlined in the Secretary-General's report, which constitute a concrete proposal to include women in conflict prevention and mediation. In particular, we wish to highlight the importance of nominating women to lead negotiation processes and increasing the number of women in the foreign services and security establishments.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Equally, the proposal to increase the number of women police and troops in United Nations missions is highly desirable in addressing the specific needs of women in conflict and postconflict countries.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    In that regard, South Africa is among the States with the highest representation of women across all spheres of Government. Women are also at the helm of ministries in the fields of international relations, cooperation and defence. In the area of peacekeeping, we have deployed gender mainstreaming officers in positions of command in peacekeeping missions to ensure that issues related to women are addressed. In addition, we are one of the top three troop-contributing countries with the largest contingent of women in peacekeeping missions.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    In the recent past, South African women held the position of Deputy Police commissioner in the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur. We believe that the presence of women in peacekeeping missions positively benefits local women and girls, including other vulnerable groups in countries in, and emerging from, conflict.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Based on its past experience, South Africa is conscious of the centrality of women as peacemakers and facilitators in political processes and peacebuilding initiatives, particularly at the grass-roots level. Women at all levels of society have a role to play in conflict prevention and peacebuilding as agents of change. In that regard, South African Women in Dialogue has been actively engaged with women's organizations in countries such as Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Sudan in sharing experiences and lessons learned with women in States emerging from conflict. South Africa continues to contribute to popularizing the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) through structures such as the Southern African Development Community, the African Union and the Pan-African Women's Organization. To that end, South Africa recently held the Progressive Women's Movement of South Africa Summit on Women, Peace and Security in May.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, as members of the Security Council, we should encourage the incorporation of a gender perspective of preventative diplomacy initiatives in our mandate renewals. That could be achieved, first, through the effective utilization of women as mediators, including through the good offices of the Secretary-General; secondly, by increasing the number of women Special Representatives, thirdly, by making the utmost use of the gender expertise resident in UN-Women; and fourthly, by incorporating the gender perspective in the work of Ad Hoc Working Group on Conflict Prevention and Resolution in Africa. Finally, South Africa welcomes the adoption of the draft presidential statement before us.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    Exactly a week ago, the Security Council resolution on Yemen (resolution 2014 (2011)) called upon all concerned parties to improve women's participation in conflict resolution and encouraged them to facilitate the equal and full participation of women at decision making levels. Yesterday's resolution on Libya (resolution 2016 (2011)) emphasized the importance of the full and equal participation of women and the respect for the human rights of all. We welcome these very strong calls.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    During this eventful year, women have taken to the streets and squares across North Africa and the Middle East and demanded change, equality, freedom and justice alongside men. We call on the Security Council to ensure that women's voices are heard and reflected in planning, actions and results. Provisions on women's full participation and on the protection and promotion of women's human rights should be included in all relevant country-specific resolutions, and they should be systematically followed up when the special envoys and Special Representatives of the Secretary-General report back to the Council.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    The conflict-prevention and mitigation efforts of women through civil society and governmental channels deserve our increased financial, political and technical support. Civil society participation serves a double aim: it fosters inclusive dialogue and development. It also builds the capacity of women to engage in more formal processes. Increasing the number of women in Government structures, for example in the security and justice sectors, makes such institutions more democratic, gender-responsive and accountable. This contributes to conflict prevention.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    Women must be fully involved from the very beginning of peace processes so as to enhance the quality and sustainability of peace agreements. Mediation and negotiation teams should have specialized gender expertise and carry out inclusive consultations. Further efforts are urgently needed to nominate and appoint more women mediators and to address the obstacles women face. Increasing the number of women in international organizations and in national diplomatic services is one tool for enlarging the pool of qualified women. At the same time, guidance and expertise is needed for mediators to integrate a gender perspective in ceasefire and in peace agreements. The Nordic countries welcome the work of UNWomen and fully support its joint strategy with the Department of Political Affairs on gender and mediation as an effective tool.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    In post-conflict planning and budgeting, there should be targeted actions and sector-specific gender experts for all relevant areas, such as security sector reform and economic recovery. The Secretary-General's seven-point action plan on peacebuilding (see S/2010/466) provides detailed recommendations on that. We welcome the work done so far. However, much remains to be done, and we encourage the United Nations to implement all of the recommendations without delay. As donors, we commit to do our part both by supporting women's participation in post-conflict donor conferences and by directing funding for initiatives that contribute to gender equality.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    A year ago we made commitments to advance the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). I would like to report briefly on three areas in which the Nordic countries have concretely implemented their commitments. The first area is national action plans. All Nordic countries have established national action plans based on a holistic view of peace, security, development and human rights. Several line ministries, governmental agencies and civil society organizations work together to ensure timely and effective implementation and promotion of resolution 1325 (2000). The Nordic national action plans are results-oriented, and their implementation is guided by a set of indicators to measure real progress.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    The Nordic countries have engaged in twinning and cooperation with partner countries, including Afghanistan, Kenya, Liberia, Nepal and the Philippines. We provide technical and financial support for the development of their new structures. But we also learn from them and hope that in this way our activities will be more responsive to the needs and priorities of countries with recent experience of conflict or fragility. Together we foster political will for women's rights in every part of the world. The Nordic countries have greatly benefited from the advice and partnership of civil society. We support the work of local and regional non-governmental organizations from Afghanistan to the Great Lakes region and from Nepal to the Sudan.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    Secondly, we are pleased to report a clear increase in the number of women among the military, police and civilian peacekeepers deployed. We also committed to train our personnel on gender equality and human rights. The mixed police teams deployed in Haiti, Liberia and Afghanistan have all received training on resolution 1325 (2000). Some have been specifically trained to address sexual and gender-based violence. We have developed a human rights manual for all crisis management personnel and supported gender-sensitive security sector reform in Palestine and the Balkans.

  • Country

    Finland
  • Extracts

    I thank you, Madam President, for this opportunity to share some of the Nordic countries' views and recommendations. We stand ready to continue to work with the Council and with the United Nations towards full implementation of resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    The Security Council reached a consensus more than a decade ago in recognizing, through the adoption on 31 October 2000 of resolution 1325 (2000), the decisive role of women in the prevention and resolution of conflicts and in peacebuilding. In its presidential statement S/PRST/2001/31, the Council made commitments on this issue. In doing so, it established that without the effective participation of women in peace processes, our efforts to maintain international peace and security would always be incomplete and would yield diminished results.

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    We note that much progress has been made in developing a normative framework to strengthen the action of the international community. Resolution 1325 (2000) is the foundation of that structure. That foundation has expanded and now forms a body with resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010). Together, those resolutions offer the Council and the international community as a whole a vast body of values and principles that can guide our action in matters of participation, protection, capacity building and the fight against impunity, but also in the rehabilitation and reintegration of women in society in the context of peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    We welcome the fact that a majority of Security Council resolutions focus particular attention on the question of women's effective participation. That fortunate trend should be pursued so that it becomes an essential part of the work of the Council and of the United Nations.

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    In light of the persistent realities in conflict situations, especially the continuing violence against women, we need a renewed commitment on the part of all actors, first and foremost States, but also regional governmental institutions and civil society organizations. We must be more vigilant about putting into practice the relevant recommendations in the Council resolutions. We must also be more mindful of the Secretary-General's recommendations aimed at greater integration of women in prevention, mediation and peacebuilding in postconflict situations

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    The obstacles to women taking a broader role are often cultural in nature. We believe that this aspect can be addressed in the Secretary-General's report devoted to the high-level meeting scheduled for 2015. We also encourage UN-Women to work more on overcoming cultural obstacles that can hinder peacebuilding. Greater action by UN-Women, particularly in Africa, can be decisive. From that point of view, a crucial task is finalizing work on the indicators likely to allow us to assess progress but also, above all, measure the impediments to our action. We would like to welcome here the efforts made by the Secretary-General to increase the number of women who hold positions of senior responsibility in coordinating the Organization's efforts to promote peace and security, both at the Secretariat and in peacekeeping missions.

  • Country

    Gabon
  • Extracts

    I would like to conclude by stressing that promoting more effective political participation by women at the level of the African continent to make them effective agents in prevention and peacebuilding efforts requires a greater contribution from all regional, multilateral and even bilateral players. Setting up programmes devoted to capacity-building for women and young girls, including those aimed at their socioeconomic empowerment, are crucial, especially in the reconstruction and peacebuilding phase. We also believe that the various entities of the United Nations system and regional and international financial institutions, including the World Bank, must also play a dominant role in this area. We would like to express our full support for the draft presidential statement that will be adopted at the end of our debate.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    Third, it is not enough to simply advocate the participation of women in peace processes. We need to provide concrete support for women to build the skills needed for meaningful involvement. And education is crucial. At the same time, social barriers blocking women's access to peace processes need to be addressed. Since men are also a part of the equation, civic education and human rights programmes for both men and women at the community level can help lift these barriers and hammer home the importance of gender inclusiveness. We must also support civil society organizations, in particular women's groups, which are vital to creating better links among women and between state and community.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    Last, it is high time we fully mainstream Resolution 1325 into the work of the Security Council. The Council should ensure that resolutions, including mission mandates and renewals, consistently integrate and substantively advance the “Women and Peace and Security” agenda. The Security Council should also benefit more regularly and frequently from briefings by the Executive Director of UN Women and relevant Special Representatives of the Secretary-General.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    To achieve more consistent, serious progress in the implementation of 1325 at the global level, Italy welcomes the strategic framework and its concrete targets to guide the UN's implementation of Resolution 1325 developed by the Secretary-General, and the use of the set of indicators to monitor progress in implementing the framework. The framework will ensure a more comprehensive approach and more result-oriented action by the UN system. Regional organizations should consider adopting similar tools. At the national level, action plans remain a key instrument to ensuring implementation of the resolution.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    In December 2010 Italy adopted a three-year action plan on Resolution 1325. The plan provides a strategic framework to improve implementation of 1325 by having a national focal point at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs monitor all relevant activities. The plan focuses on key goals such as: increasing the number of women in the national Police and in the armed Forces; strengthening the inclusion of women in peace operations and in the decision-making bodies of peace operations; protecting the human rights of women and children, in conflict and post-conflict; strengthening women's participation in peace processes; and engaging with civil society organizations to promote the implementation of Resolution 1325.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    Since then Italy has had regular contacts with civil society organizations to benefit from their experience in the field, particularly in the collection of sex-disaggregated data. The national focal point is promoting awareness activities by disseminating the plan throughout all sectors of Government and society. At the international level, Italy has introduced “Women, Peace, and Security” as a priority question to be raised during the Universal Periodic Review of Human Rights Council, when the human rights situation of Member States under consideration are being addressed, in addition to bringing up the issue in bilateral contacts with the countries concerned.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    Eleven years after the adoption of Resolution 1325, we are all called to renew our commitment to ensure women may assert their right to determine the peaceful futures of their communities. Let's not miss this opportunity.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    In the field of education and training, gender-perspective modules have now been included in most of NATO's pre-deployment training efforts. This is an area where we feel we can benefit from the experience of other international organisations and we are thus pleased to be contributing to a United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) project aimed at Supporting Gender Mainstreaming in Security Sector Reform in the Western Balkans. We hope that this, and similar cooperation which we have already begun with the United Nations, the European Union and the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, will continue and deepen over the course of the coming year.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    There can be no doubt that the establishment of UN-Women constitutes a milestone in the defence of the rights and the protection of women. In June, Under-Secretary-General achelet submitted to Member States a first strategic plan, which my country fully supports.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    Eleven years after the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), the Council has continued to make progress in providing guidelines on strengthening the protection of women in situations of armed conflict. To that end, in 2008, the Council adopted resolution 1820 (2008), which noted that attacks on women in armed conflicts continued to occur. On 16 December 2010, the Council adopted resolution 1960 (2010). One important aspect that has been highlighted is the need for increased participation by women in political processes, particularly in mediation and in peacekeeping and peacebuilding operations. In that respect, the meeting organized by UN-Women in the context of the sixty sixth session of the General Assembly on women and political participation takes on particular importance. My delegation feels that the meeting should be replicated at the regional, national and local levels.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    With regard to the peacebuilding process, Chile notes the work of the Peacebuilding Commission and the vision of gender equality that the Commission has brought to its work, in keeping with the resolutions that led to its creation. It is also noteworthy that the Peacebuilding Fund has allocated significant resources to incorporating the gender perspective in the projects it funds.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    The implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) is not the exclusive province of the Security Council or of the United Nations system; it is also incumbent upon the international community as a whole. In that respect, the formulation and development of a national action plan is crucial. Chile has had such a plan in place since 2009. By involving a broad swath of civil society in its development, and by incorporating the Secretary-General's earlier recommendations, we designed an integrated action plan that brings together, as effectively as possible, agencies charged with the prevention, management and resolution of conflicts, all with the comprehensive inclusion of a gender perspective.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    The main action lines of that document are to apply a gender focus to the respect and promotion of human rights; to promote the equal participation of women both in peacekeeping operations and in related decision-making bodies; to bring a gender perspective in the broadest sense of the term to bear on the design, implementation and execution of our international cooperation policies; to strengthen the technical capacity of both public officials and civil society with regard to gender issues and security and conflict; and to promote the regional implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) through the exchange of experience and international cooperation, both bilaterally and via the regional peacekeeping operations in which Chile takes part, particularly in the context of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, we support today's presidential statement of the Council (S/PRST/2011/20), which reiterates this principal organ's commitment to the complete and effective implementation of resolutions 1325 (2000), 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010) on women, peace and security, as well as previous relevant presidential statements.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    The adoption by the Security Council of resolution 1325 (2000) bears testimony to the progress made during the past decade in the area of women and peace and security. That landmark resolution has brought much-needed attention to the question of women's empowerment, which represents a priority for my country. While all the resolutions on women and peace and security are equally important, resolution 1325 (2000) serves as an umbrella resolution in addressing women's empowerment, their task as peacebuilders and their fragile position as victims of war.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    The Republic of Croatia welcomes the latest report of the Secretary-General on the implementation of that resolution (S/2011/598*), the recommendations contained therein and the presidential statement adopted by the Council today (S/PRST/2011/20). Furthermore, Croatia commends the roles of and work done by both the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, Ms. Wallström, and the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict, Ms. Coomaraswamy.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    Those opportunities, however, can be enhanced significantly depending on how the international community sets its priorities for recovery and uses its strategies for peacebuilding. Those priorities should consist of specific national and international policies aimed at increasing women's participation in conflict prevention and resolution, mediation, peace negotiations and peacebuilding. The integrationof the resolution has to be country-driven, and Member States need to take responsibility for its success by ensuring that it is integrated into national policies. We urge countries to apply a broad gendermainstreaming approach across Government, for instance through a system-wide approach that links development, humanitarian and defence issues. All plans should include civil society consultations, as well as monitoring and reporting mechanisms.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    I am very pleased to say that the Croatian Government has recently adopted its national action plan for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and related resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009) and 1889 (2009). The basic objective is to support and monitor their implementation at all levels. At the local level, that can be done through the mitigation of the effects of conflicts and crises and by mainstreaming the gender awareness of our local population, while at the national level it will be set as part of Government programmes. Furthermore, Croatia will remain actively involved in the work of international organizations engaged in the areas covered by the resolutions in question.

  • Country

    Croatia
  • Extracts

    Our national action plan will contribute to the implementation of specific tasks in a more consistent and coordinated manner, setting up measurable appropriate indicators and raising interest in women's participation in issues related to peace and security. Following the completion of the four-year period the plan has been set up for, it will be revised in the light of its performance. Specific measures in the plan are suitable for implementation in coordination with efforts by civil society and religious organizations engaged in providing humanitarian aid and development assistance.

  • Speaker

    The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)
  • Extracts

    The Economic and Social Council devoted its 2010 annual ministerial review last year to the internationally agreed development goals and commitments in regard to gender equality and the empowerment of women. The ministerial declaration adopted by the Council broke new ground in that, for the first time, an intergovernmental body highlighted a number of crosscutting issues where action was expected to positively enhance gender-related goals. These cross-cutting issues are also relevant with regard to the role of women in contributing to peacemaking and peacebuilding. I wish briefly to highlight some of these crosscutting issues, which are of particular relevance to this debate and call for a common approach by the United Nations system at the normative, programmatic and operational levels.

  • Speaker

    The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)
  • Extracts

    First, discriminatory attitudes and gender stereotypes, including in the education sector, must be ended. This implies a strong advocacy role by the United Nations for women's human rights and the elaboration of media strategies and tools for outreach, in particular when these rights are violated or threatened to be violated. Secondly, all forms of discrimination and violence against women and girls must be ended. The United Nations system is called upon to develop a more coherent response to this phenomenon, including through the Secretary-General's campaign on violence against women. Special attention should also be paid to the recognition that sexual violence can be both a cause and a consequence of HIV/AIDS, as shown in conflict settings where both are endemic.

  • Speaker

    The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)
  • Extracts

    By highlighting these cross-cutting issues, I have tried to propose a method for action through which the United Nations can act more coherently and our work can have increased impact. If we — the General Assembly, the Security Council, the Economic and Social Council and its Commission on the Status of Women, as well as the Peacebuilding Commission — act in concert and in an integrated way, we can help to ensure progress in the many areas highlighted by the indicators to track the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) highlighted in the Secretary-General's report (S/2011/598*) that is before us today.

  • Speaker

    The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)
  • Extracts

    As my predecessor suggested last year at the tenth-anniversary celebration of the adoption of that important resolution, the Economic and Social Council could do its part by ensuring follow-up and monitoring of the indicators developed by its Statistical Commission on violence against women. Given its strong experience in reviewing the achievement of development objectives, particularly the Millennium Development Goals, the Council could engage in this task with real know-how and institutional backup from the United Nations system at large and by its subsidiary bodies.

  • Speaker

    The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)
  • Extracts

    The members of the Economic and Social Council also commit to providing the requisite guidance to the agencies, funds and programmes on implementing the actions required to implement resolution 1325 (2000), particularly those linked to the coordination of humanitarian action, the transition from relief to development and the promotion of the active role and participation of women in sustainable development

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    We note with satisfaction that the draft presidential statement accords with the theme of this open debate, namely, “The role and participation of women in conflict prevention and mediation”. Through the draft presidential statement, the Council recognizes that women can, and do, play crucial roles in the prevention of conflict. Nevertheless, it also notes that more needs to be done to create the enabling conditions for the participation of women in all stages of the peace process.

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    On the subject of United Nations coherence and effectiveness in particular, we recognize the important and central role of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-Women), working in close partnership and collaboration with the Special Representatives of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict and for Children and Armed Conflict, respectively.

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    The gaps and challenges hindering the full implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) are indeed substantial. National, regional and international actors must rededicate themselves to addressing them. We believe that developing and implementing national action plans constitutes a viable strategy for fulfilling the obligations under resolution 1325 (2000). As a signatory to the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Dakar Declaration, Nigeria has committed itself to accelerating the national and regional implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). The Declaration calls for a regional action plan within ECOWAS to support national action plans. ECOWAS will coordinate and collaborate with the United Nations Office in West Africa and with UN-Women in this process.

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    Nigeria is also committed to fulfilling its obligations under the African Charter of Human and Peoples' Rights on the rights of women in Africa. As Ms. Bachelet has often said, the obstacles to women's political participation, which I believe have a direct bearing on their capacity to play an active role in preventive diplomacy and conflict prevention, are indeed enormous. Violence, poverty, lack of access to education and health care, and limited economic opportunities all combine to undermine the role of women and girls in conflict prevention, peace negotiations and peacebuilding. It is therefore necessary that we develop and take measures to address these inherent obstacles. Promoting women's equality and empowerment is, in our view, one of the best ways to address the root causes of conflict and therefore prevent such conflict. I envisage a presidential statement along those lines in the near future.

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    We recognize the relevance and relationship between the Council's preventive diplomacy initiatives and its women, peace and security agenda. As women are usually some of the first and worst hit in any conflict, preventing conflicts from breaking out serves to ensure the peace and security of women and girls. Even as we all remain true to the provisions of resolution 1325 (2000), which focuses on armed coflict and post-conflict situations, it has become imperative to devote equal attention to conflict prevention strategies, including the use of preventive diplomacy. It is gratifying to know that the Council has the opportunity every year to review the progress made in implementation of resolution 1325 (2000)

  • Country

    Nigeria
  • Extracts

    We look forward to the inclusion in next year's report of the Secretary-General of, among other things, specific actions and achievements as well as the challenges faced in the implementation of the presidential statement that we will be adopting later today. We also look forward to the high-level review to be held in 2015 on the progress made in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), confident that this and future presidential statements and initiatives of the Council will play pivotal roles in national, regional and global strategies on the women, peace and security agenda.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    Resolution 1325 (2000), adopted 11 years ago, represents a fundamental milestone, because ever since its adoption the issue of the role of women in peace and security has occupied an important place on the agenda of the Security Council. As a result, it has taken on an important and essential role in the achievement of international peace and security. The resolution has served as the point of departure for subsequent developments on this issue in the Security Council when it comes to ensuring the participation of women in peacekeeping and peacebuilding and, most especially, with regard to combating sexual violence against women and girls. For that reason, along with international human rights law and international humanitarian law, resolution 1325 (2000) and resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010) provide the international community with a normative framework for considering the needs of women in conflict and post-conflict situations.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    In that context, my delegation would like to point out that my country is a contributor of military observers. I am pleased to announce that, this November, Peru will deploy women on the ground in peacekeeping operations. We have already said repeatedly that we should never allow sexual violence to be seen as the inevitable consequence of armed conflict. We therefore welcome the zero-tolerance policy on sexual violence and abuse that the SecretaryGeneral has been introducing into peacekeeping operations. We also believe that training and consciousness raising for military personnel deployed on the ground are fundamental to enable them to respond in a timely and appropriate fashion when faced with situations of sexual violence.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    My country resolutely supports the work currently being carried out by UN-Women and encourages it to continue its decisive contribution to the implementation of resolutions relating to peace and security, as well as to follow-up with regard to the indicators that the Secretary-General presented in October 2010. Similarly, my country values the work of the Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict and the Special Representative on Children and Armed Conflict on aspects related to women, peace and security, in particular with respect to the prevention of sexual violence.

  • Country

    Peru
  • Extracts

    Peru believes that the high-level review of the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) proposed for 2015 will be an opportunity to comprehensively review the progress made by the United Nations system and by Member States in the priority areas of prevention, participation, protection, relief and recovery, as well as on the recommendations put forward by the Secretary-General or by a working group established to implement the resolution.

  • Country

    Sudan
  • Extracts

    I should like to reiterate my congratulations to you, Madam, as you crown your presidency of the Security Council by devoting this open debate to the issue of women and peace and security 11 years after the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), on the basis of which the United Nations has adopted a strategic framework and standard indicators to assess the implementation of the resolution and its time frame at the regional and international levels, as reflected in the report of the Secretary-General (S/2011/598*) before us. On this occasion, we evoke the need to push forward in implementing resolution 1325 (2000) in the coming decade by adopting comprehensive and cohesive regional action plans. In that respect, we note the importance of strengthening the capacities of countries emerging from conflict, especially given the fact that the issue of women and peace and security has become one of the most prominent items on the Council's agenda over the past decade.

  • Country

    Sudan
  • Extracts

    My country has applied the principle of equal pay for equal work since 1967. Legislation and laws concerning women have been developed, especially in 2003, when a law was passed equalizing the age of retirement for men and women. With respect to the promotion of the rights of Sudanese women in the area of political participation, there has been a qualitative development in the form of the electoral law of 2008, which increased the percentage of participation by women to 25 per cent in the federal and State Parliaments and was fully implemented during the elections held in the country last year. Thus women constitute one quarter of the membership of the Sudanese Parliament, while the report before the Council (S/2011/598*) states in paragraph 23 that women make up 19 per cent of parliamentarians globally.

    Regarding the level of participation of Sudanese women in the civil service, which has reached 66 per cent, I wish to note by way of example that in the judiciary alone, there are 79 women judges. Many such judges eventually become Supreme Court judges. Sudanese women have held high diplomatic posts, and many of them serve as ambassadors to various countries. A large number of women are doctors and specialize in various fields of medicine. In addition, they have assumed leading posts in the armed forces, the police and the security forces.

  • Country

    Sudan
  • Extracts

    Concerning the issue of violence against women, the Government of the Sudan in 2007 adopted a national strategy elaborated at both the official and the popular levels. The strategy includes six principles on strengthening and revitalizing the participation of women in the maintenance of peace, and on their right to participate in terms of decision-making, economic development, education, health, the environment and the settlement of disputes. The strategy has been implemented at both the federal and the state level. In that respect, the priorities included in paragraph 3 of the report of the Security Council are almost identical to the criteria included in our national strategy.

  • Country

    Sudan
  • Extracts

    The Government of the Sudan has also established several specialized centres at the federal and state levels for the coordination of women's efforts in the areas of peace and development, and for providing guidelines and advice on the principle of equality between men and women and on the gender perspective.

  • Country

    Sudan
  • Extracts

    Our national programmes on resettlement, disarmament, demobilization and reintegration have given priority to the situation of women, in close coordination with the relevant United Nations agencies, including the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM). In that respect, we commend the relationship of cooperation with UNIFEM in connection with women's issues and its role in the implementation of the aforementioned plan of action. We hope that the Fund, through the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-Women), will take on a more important and active role in enhancing national capacities and efforts aimed at advancing the situation of women in the country.

  • Country

    Sudan
  • Extracts

    We would like to highlight the sections of the report of the Secretary-General that relate to the role of women in the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals. Supporting the capacities of developing countries so as to enable them to attain those objectives is the best way to ensure the advancement of women. The provisions of the Beijing Platform for Action must be taken into consideration, especially given the strong interlinkage between the Platform for Action and the realization of the MDGs, as well as the impact of such realization on the empowerment and advancement of women.

  • Country

    Sudan
  • Extracts

    Last year, the Government of the Sudan celebrated the tenth anniversary of the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000) on women, peace and security. In our capital, Khartoum, a broad-based workshop was organized and a special day held to celebrate that anniversary, in coordination with the United Nations Mission in the Sudan and the country offices of the United Nations agencies in the country, notably UNIFEM. That celebration was an excellent opportunity to disseminate the policies of the Government of the Sudan aimed at enhancing the status of women and putting an end to all forms of violence against women, within the context of the national plan to combat gender-based violence. The implementation of that plan began in 2005 through specialized entities in the context of the Human Rights Consultative Council, the Sudan Police Administration, the Ministry of the Interior, and the department for the combat of violence against women, within the Ministry of Justice.

  • Country

    Sudan
  • Extracts

    My delegation also reaffirms the need to base the Council's measures on country reports submitted by States and on accurate information contained in the Secretary-General's periodic reports on the issue, not on information contained in reports by non-governmental organizations and media sources. My country also encourages the United Nations and its bodies to directly organize workshops and seminars with countries that are affected by conflict, in order to share expertise on the situation of women affected by armed conflict.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    My country continues to attach particular importance to the issue and would like to underscore its commitment to promoting the rights of women, particularly women in conflict situations, as well as to promoting the full implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in all its aspects.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    It is clear that resolution 1325 (2000) has defined a framework of standards guiding United Nations efforts on policies for integrating gender issues into the whole of the work of the Organization.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    The appointments of the Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-Women) and of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict are important signs that should be built on, particularly since it must be acknowledged that despite progress, shameful crimes against women continue to occur during armed conflict, especially in Africa and occupied Palestine, where women are still coping with terrible situations every day.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    National ownership of resolution 1325 (2000) is the best way to ensure its effective implementation, given that primary responsibility for combating rape as a weapon of war falls to Member States, whose duty it is to urgently take measures to deal with this phenomenon, measures that educate as well as enforce. Tunisia has already launched a national action plan for implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). In particular, it promotes training women in peacekeeping and peacebuilding so that we can deploy qualified personnel in United Nations operations on the ground.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    The plan is also designed to improve pre-deployment training, with particular emphasis on special measures aimed at protecting women against all forms of violence against them.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    Tunisia intends to continue implementing that resolution as apart of its comprehensive approach to gender equality and the empowerment of women, and will make itself available to the United Nations concerning any aspect of implementing resolution 1325 (2000) and other international instruments dealing with the welfare of women and their participation in decision-making processes, as well as promoting a culture of respect for women.

  • Country

    Tunisia
  • Extracts

    Japan welcomes the report of the Secretary-General (S/2011/598*), which demonstrates his clear commitment on this issue. We are encouraged that UN-Women, under the strong leadership of Ms. Bachelet, has been resolutely promoting the agenda of women and peace and security as one of its priorities.

  • Country

    Bangladesh
  • Extracts

    Eleven years ago, the Security Council adopted the landmark resolution 1325 (2000) on women and peace and security. Thereafter, several resolutions, such as resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010), have been adopted to buttress the process initiated in resolution 1325 (2000). We are, however, disappointed to note that violence against women and girls continues, as detailed in various reports. As we have mentioned in the past, women and girls suffer most as victims of conflict, while in the peace process they are mostly deprived of the dividends. Therefore, the onus lies on us to ensure that the oppression of women and girls, particularly that based on gender, is stopped forever.

  • Country

    Bangladesh
  • Extracts

    We recognize that empowering women will lead to their taking command of resources and acquiring adequate leadership capabilities for the efficient management of those resources. Therefore, we emphasize the fulfilment of women's economic needs and the necessity of their engagement internationally at all levels and in all forms of decision-making.

    While the former could be achieved by ensuring women's access to and participation in income- generating and entrepreneurial activities, such as micro-credit, education, vocational training and public health, the latter could be ensured through the recruitment of women, particularly to senior positions. In order to more clearly understand the needs of the women of the South, we must ensure that women from the global South get due recognition in the consideration of such recruitment. For proper coordination with the field, the fair representation of troop- and police-contributing countries must be ensured, as decided previously by the General Assembly and the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations of the United Nations. We believe that women's participation can be ensured through an inclusive process. At the policy level, this requires the creation of a mechanism to integrate women into decision-making processes, which should be supported by the necessary capacity- building initiatives at the community level that would enable women to effectively participate. We strongly believe that our debates and discussions, instead of being confined to our respective capitals, should transcend borders and reach women at the grass-roots level, women who may sometimes be unable even to find the words to express their agony. This has to be done by empowering the people, especially women, at the grass-roots level. If we fail to do so, our progress will be slow.
  • Country

    Bangladesh
  • Extracts

    In Bangladesh, through our experience of nation- building and women's empowerment, we have embraced that view and developed what our Prime Minister, Her Excellency Sheikh Hasina, calls a peace model. The central message of the model is to empower people, including women and vulnerable groups, by providing them with an education and helping them to build their skills, by ensuring that they exercise their right to vote and participate in governance, by raising their income level, by ending poverty and hunger and by eliminating all forms of discrimination and terrorism. In her address to the General Assembly (see A/66/PV.22), the Prime Minister of Bangladesh presented her model to the world community, as she is convinced that if peace is attained, development and prosperity will follow. We would be happy to share our experiences with interested delegates.

  • Country

    Bangladesh
  • Extracts

    In Bangladesh, women occupy the top political leadership posts in the country. The Constitution of Bangladesh guarantees the equality of men and women within the broad framework of non-discrimination on the grounds of religion, race or gender. The Government has adopted a national policy for women's advancement and a national plan of action. A women's development implementation committee, headed by the Minister for Women's and Children's Affairs, monitors the implementation of policies for women's empowerment. It has also introduced gender-based budgeting. The results have been highly positive. To cite just one example, the enrolment of girls in both primary and secondary level schools exceeds that of boys, helped by tuition waivers and the provision of stipends for girls in secondary schools.

  • Country

    Bangladesh
  • Extracts

    The Government has enacted laws to protect women against domestic violence and is currently implementing a number of projects to develop the capabilities of women. Many affirmative actions have been taken that help women in distress and elderly women. In order to involve women in decision-making processes, the Government has adopted a quota system for women in the national Parliament and in the recruitment of our civil service officers, in addition to direct elections and open competitions.

  • Country

    Bangladesh
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, I would reiterate that we in Bangladesh have been making our best efforts to ensure women's empowerment and participation in all spheres of life, as we believe that educating a boy means educating a person, while in contrast, educating a girl means educating a family. We are willing to replicate any good practices that we come across globally in our national policy and are similarly ready to share our relevant experience with others for the good of humankind.

  • Country

    Kenya
  • Extracts

    Prevention is undoubtedly the cornerstone of any strategy to address the challenges that society faces. We note with satisfaction the various actions that have been undertaken by Member States, the United Nations system, civil society and other actors in implementing resolution 1325 (2000). We believe that countries must systematically integrate and mainstream women- specific issues in their action plans in order to tackle the growing problem of sexual and gender-based violence during conflict and even in peacetime. In this regard, it is important that more support be extended to countries in order to buttress preventive measures and support their institutions to combat these vices.

  • Country

    Kenya
  • Extracts

    Sexual abuse is indeed one of the most pervasive crimes of our time. It is imperative, therefore, that the international community support national systems and institutions — such as the police, prosecution and the judiciary — to combat this despicable crime. My delegation wishes to underscore the importance of education and communication as tools to prevent and combat violence generally. It is in this connection that my delegation urges UN-Women to continue prioritizing education and public communication within its mandate.

  • Country

    Kenya
  • Extracts

    My delegation believes that women's participation enhances social harmony and inclusivity and reduces the chances of conflict. Women, therefore, should participate as full partners in governance institutions. The new Kenya Constitution has entrenched women's participation in all aspects of Kenya's governance structures and social life in general. Furthermore, the national policy on gender and development has set up an ambitious agenda aimed at integrating women into the mainstream of decision- making processes through regulatory and institutional reform.

    These efforts have begun to bear fruit. Kenya's next Parliament will have 48 and 16 seats reserved for women in the National Assembly and the Senate, respectively, in addition to those who will be competitively elected in the various constituencies. Furthermore, in all cases where special interests are represented in the legislature, the seats will be divided equally between men and women. Currently, women serve as members of constitutional commissions, such as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the Commission on the Implementation of the Constitution and the Public Service Commission, to name just a few. Additionally, the top two positions of any public body cannot be held by people of the same gender, thus giving an equal chance to women to either lead or eventually ascend to the top leadership positions of all public institutions.

  • Country

    Kenya
  • Extracts

    The Security Council has an important role to play in dealing with peace and security matters internationally. States, however, bear the primary responsibility to protect their citizens from violence. It is in this regard that my delegation calls for more concerted efforts by the international community and the United Nations system to support national efforts to prevent and address the myriad issues surrounding conflicts. Indeed, countries in conflict and those recently emerging from conflict have unique challenges that, if not comprehensively addressed, will lead to either a continuation or a relapse into conflict.

  • Country

    Kenya
  • Extracts

    Finally, Kenya expresses its gratitude to the Secretary-General for his comprehensive report (S/2011/598*) on this agenda item, which, inter alia, showcases the key sectors where tangible progress has been made by countries, and identifies gaps and challenges in implementation. Kenya is particularly grateful for the thematic indicators under which Member States reports were compiled. My delegation will seek to engage further with all Member States and stakeholders in order to see to it that the indicators achieve the widest possible acceptance.

  • Country

    Kenya
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, I wish to once again reiterate Kenya's commitment to implementing resolution 1325 (2000). In so doing, we must ensure greater coherence and coordination in addressing women's issues in conflict and post-conflict situations in a holistic manner. I emphasize once again that the establishment of UN-Women accords us a very strong platform for addressing issues affecting women in general, and the acceleration of the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in particular. It is Kenya's expectation that UN-Women will rise to the challenge expeditiously.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    More than a decade has passed since the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000). Throughout that period, the United Nations system, regional organizations, Member States and civil society have made significant efforts to adapt the resolution to local settings through a wide spectrum of measures and initiatives. Progress has been made in terms of discourse and evolving practice on the participation of women in conflict prevention, resolution and peacebuilding, and awareness has increased of the threat that sexual violence constitutes to peace and security.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    Despite important national, regional and international efforts, however, the conditions that women and girls still face in situations of armed conflict continue to be abhorrent. The benefits of resolution 1325 (2000) have yet to reach most women in conflict and in fragile settings. In that regard, allow me to make the following comments. First, we view the prevention of conflict as a crucial element of resolution 1325 (2000). That includes the prevention of all forms of conflict-related violence against women and girls. Sexual violence remains the least-condemned war crime in peace agreements and beyond. The elimination of impunity is perhaps the single most effective preventive tool to fight that crime. In that regard, reforming the security sector and ensuring respect for the rule of law in a gender-responsive manner is of crucial importance. Conflict and post-conflict societies should be assisted in those areas as early as possible. The preventive aspect of resolution 1325 (2000) also includes women's full and equal involvement in conflict prevention efforts. We concur with the Secretary-General's report (S/2011/598*) that more attention needs to be paid to women's roles in the field. We support his recommendation for the Council to use its deliberations on preventive diplomacy and mediation to consider means of enhancing the role of women in conflict prevention.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    International, regional and national actors should therefore spare no efforts to engage women and to ensure the inclusion of gender expertise in peace efforts. It is also essential that regular consultations between special envoys and mediators and women's civil society groups become standard operating procedure.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    Partnerships with male community leaders and opinion-shapers could also play an important role in raising awareness of the benefits of women's participation and could help to implement gender related programming at the local level.

  • Country

    Lebanon
  • Extracts

    Finally, it is our collective and individual responsibility as Member States to adopt a determined and consistent approach that will lead to positive and concrete results in the lives of women in conflict and post-conflict situations. The framework and the tools are at hand; let us back them with the necessary political will.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    Already one year has passed since we commemorated the tenth anniversary of resolution 1325 (2000) with many activities, including a similar debate in this very Council (S/PV.6411); a plethora of commitments by Member States to translate the major tenets of that resolution into smart national action plans; the adoption of initial indicators to measure progress; and a request that the Secretary-General develop a strategic framework to guide the United Nations implementation of the resolution. It remains our challenge to meet the expectations that have been raised by those activities.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    We commend the Secretary-General on his report on women and peace and security (S/2011/598*), which reflects a laudable effort to use the indicators currently available in assessing progress. The report provides some insights into good practices and progress made by Member States, regional and international organizations, as well as constraints in the global effort to fully engage women in all national processes, whether they concern peace and security or political or socio-economic development.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    Liberia continues to make progress in its efforts to involve women at decision-making levels in all areas of national governance. At critical junctures in Liberia's history, its women have demonstrated the ability to lead. Liberia holds the distinct honour of being the birthplace and home of the first woman and the first African to be appointed President of the General Assembly at its twenty-fourth session in 1970.
    In recent history, during a lull in the protracted conflict, Liberia had a female interim President, in the person of Mrs. Ruth Perry, who steered the work of a transitional Government from 1996 to 1997. Then there were the unsung heroes — the countless number of women who bravely shouldered the responsibility of caring for their families, even as they participated in discussions on peace and security, while living in the internally displaced persons and refugee camps across West Africa and further afield.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    Since the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), discussions have revealed many examples of women's effective contribution to conflict prevention, peace processes and peacebuilding in the various regions of the world. Women bear the consequences of conflict and are thus well placed to contribute to solutions. Having reached this realization, our common challenge is to find creative means to institutionalize this role at the national and international levels. Women must be capacitated and strategically positioned to play their rightful role.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    Liberia is moving deliberately and purposefully towards the fulfilment of its commitments to women's advancement. There has been a gradual increase in women's presence in leadership and decision-making positions at the central and local Government levels. Gender-responsive policies, strategies and programmes, some of which are mentioned in the Secretary-General's report, are being integrated into all sectors of national action. In 2009, Liberia became one of the first countries to have completed its national action plans for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). This progress has been made possible through the consistent and much-appreciated support of development partners. All the same, inadequate resources remain a challenge and hindrance to robust implementation.
    We are encouraged by the recognition that has been accorded internationally to the modest achievements made by Liberia in its efforts to meaningfully involve women in national governance and to build and utilize their productive capacities, including for the consolidation of peace. Mindful that food security has a conflict preventive dimension, I cannot fail to mention that the Hunger Project's prestigious 2011 Africa Prize for Leadership was awarded a few days ago to the Liberian Minister of Agriculture, Ms. Florence Chenoweth, for her dedication to improving the livelihoods and food security of women farmers in Liberia.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    The incidence of rape of girls and women is still unacceptable high, and women constitute only 14 per cent of the Liberian legislature. We are humbled when we consider the vastness of the challenges that still lie ahead; the gender inequities that still exist; and the high walls that we still have to scale before female mediators and peace negotiators become normal features of the international peace architecture. We believe that the systematic use of quotas at the national and international levels could help to accelerate progress towards this objective. Affirmative action programmes are also required to give the necessary impetus to our effort to place women centrally in conflict prevention, mediation and peace processes.

  • Country

    Liberia
  • Extracts

    Liberia pledges to make more concerted efforts to comply with reporting requirements so as to contribute meaningfully to future reports of the Secretary-General on women and peace and security. The presence of UN-Women in Liberia provides the needed support to national efforts to implement resolution 1325 (2000) and reduce gender inequities. We therefore look forward to continued partnership with UN-Women towards the enhancement of women's empowerment, peacebuilding and sustainable development. It is our hope that, in the not too distant future, the capacities of women will be so fully integrated into the global peace architecture that the focus of debates on conflict prevention and mediation will not be on women's role and participation but simply on the subject matter.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    Through the adoption by the Security Council of resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions, the United Nations has been able to develop, integrate and fine-tune the tools available to it to address a gender perspective in a multidimensional manner, by recognizing the importance of women's active participation in the various stages of conflict prevention and resolution, as well as in peacekeeping, reconstruction and peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    We welcome in particular the establishment of UN-Women, the agency that lies at the heart of the gender architecture of the Organization, as it coordinates all efforts undertaken in this field. We welcome also the inclusion of specific indicators in the reports of the Secretary-General, as is the case in the report before us today (S/2011/598*), as well as the seven-point action plan. Unfortunately, however, as a result of the unequal implementation of resolutions dealing with the gender architecture, there exist significant gaps. One of the clearest examples of this is the persistence of sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict situations.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    The presence of additional female peacekeepers and female staff in peacebuilding operations, at both the military police and civilian levels, would have a clear positive effect. It is therefore necessary to increase the number of women who hold high-ranking posts in such operations. We welcome the decision of the Peacebuilding Fund to allocate $5 million to the gender promotion initiative; we hope that this will lead to tangible results in the short term.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    We believe that the provisions of these Security Council resolutions are relevant at both the international and national levels. In Mexico, following an approach to prevent violence, the institutions that are responsible for monitoring security, safety and law enforcement receive ongoing training in the field of gender affairs. As a result, more women have become involved in the administration of justice, with the notable example of the appointment of the Attorney- General, Marisela Morales — the first Mexican woman to hold this important post. In turn, the national defence agency has trained almost 80,000 personnel in the field of gender equity, and this year will see the graduation of the first female air force pilot. In the diplomatic sphere, a high number of female representatives have had a bearing my country's foreign policy, starting with Ms. Patricia Espinosa Cantellano, Minister for Foreign Affairs.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    The recommendations contained in the report of the Secretary-General are highly useful in identifying existing shortcomings in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and in ensuring the harmonization and coordination of United Nations efforts in that area. Mexico will continue to support the protection, empowerment and participation of women in decisionmaking processes, as we are fully convinced that women are key stakeholders in strengthening the three pillars of lasting peace, namely, economic recovery; social cohesion and political legitimacy. The commitment of States Members of the United Nations and of civil society is essential in order to continue to strengthen the central role played by women in the maintenance of international peace and security.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    We meet today to recognize the crucial role of women in the peaceful resolution of conflicts, the tangible fruits of which have already been seen in Afghanistan in the decisive presence of women at the Consultative Peace Jirga in 2010 and in the continuing efforts to ensure women's participation in leadership positions within and outside of the Afghan Government. The debate is particularly appropriate as Afghanistan is entering the second phase of transition to Afghan leadership and ownership and increased responsibility for security and economic development.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    With regard to development, we have begun to implement our 10-year national action plan for the women of Afghanistan based upon the priorities of the Afghanistan National Development Strategy. As part of the action plan, we have established gender units in 14 of the 25 Government ministries. However, given the 10-year timeline, accelerated efforts are necessary to ensure the full implementation of that very comprehensive action plan, which incorporates vital goals that include achieving a 30 per cent rate of representation of women in governmental positions by the end of 2013 and their 35 per cent participation rate among university students by the end of 2012.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    Our international partners have assisted the Afghan Government in our endeavours. UN-Women has administered a multi-donor trust fund for the elimination of violence against women that provided grants for national organizations to combat violence against women. I am very pleased to report that, in collaboration with UN-Women, Afghanistan has submitted its first country report on the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. The continued collaboration of our Government, international partners and both Afghan and international civil society groups will be vital to ensure the full realization of women's rights in a strong and stable Afghanistan.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    Building a stable and secure environment that enables women to live free of intimidation and violence and promotes their participation and leadership in efforts to maintain peace and security is one of the core objectives of the Afghan Government.

  • Country

    Afghanistan
  • Extracts

    We are also focusing on women political actors at national, subnational and local levels, as well as on capacity-building and advocacy strategies to enable them to obtain critical roles in high-level decisionmaking processes, policy and law-making positions in key Government institutions and to assist them in carrying out their significant political and social responsibilities. In conclusion, with the support of our partners and the international community, we will continue to work towards the full implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), while recognizing that our goal of sustainable peace and security in Afghanistan will not be achieved without the full participation of the entire Afghan nation.

  • Country

    Fiji
  • Extracts

    We are encouraged by the initiatives currently being undertaken by the Secretary-General and UN-Women in the implementation of Resolution 1325. We acknowledge that progress has been made in all the four thematic areas of the UN System-Wide Action Plan. We believe however, that much work remains to be done not only in relation to the UN strategic framework, but importantly in the national implementation of the resolution.
  • Country

    Fiji
  • Extracts

    To effectively progress the resolution, we need to take a holistic approach. We depend on the guidance of the Security Council and the advice of the Secretary-General, UN Women, DPKO and other relevant UN departments and agencies. We need the input of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations and the Peacebuilding Commission, and the assistance of the civil society and regional organisations. In addition, we need to build local capacities by learning from the experiences and good practices of other countries on 1325.
  • Country

    Fiji
  • Extracts

    We welcome the initiatives of the Security Council and the work carried out by the Secretary-General in establishing the set of indicators to track the implementation of the resolution and to provide guidance for all Member States in their efforts to achieve the desired goals of the resolution. Such universal indicators should be complemented by national implementing frameworks and policies to ensure that the various thematic areas of the resolution are addressed.
  • Country

    Fiji
  • Extracts

    It is for this reason that Fiji supports the development of a regional framework for the Pacific SIDS as an important step towards full implementation of the resolution in the Pacific. We believe that a framework which incorporates the principles of the resolution, with clear policy guidelines on its application to our unique national and regional characteristics, will accelerate the implementation process in the Pacific.
  • Country

    Fiji
  • Extracts

    Fiji's commitment to the resolution is exemplified in our policies that, amongst other things, strongly encourage the recruitment of women in our security forces and their deployment with equal opportunities to peacekeeping missions. We support the global effort to increase the participation of women in UN police peacekeeping roles to 20% by 2014. We encourage the provision of pre and post deployment training of our peacekeepers and welcome further assistance and expertise in this regard. Furthermore, we support the participation and representation of women at all levels of decision-making.
  • Country

    Fiji
  • Extracts

    In our consultations and interactions with civil society and the public, we acknowledge the work of FemLINKPACIFIC, a Fiji-based NGO that specifically deals with 1325. The Fijian Government promotes the enhancement of efforts to colloborate with the expertise and experience of women's groups, with a view to enhancing the implementation of 1325 at the national level.

  • Country

    Fiji
  • Extracts

    We welcome the pronouncement by the UN Secretary-General in his report that the most significant institutional development with regard to women, peace and security has been the creation of UN-Women with the purpose of leveraging the entire UN system to ensure accelerated implementation of all relevant resolutions on the issue. We therefore look forward to working with UN-Women in achieving the goals of 1325.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    It seems to us more important than ever that the Security Council address the issue of women's role and participation in conflict prevention and mediation. The Arab Spring has served to forcefully remind us of that. Women have been significant actors in the transitions that have occurred in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya. In Syria and Yemen women are today continuing to fight with exceptional courage to defend their freedom, to ensure that the most fundamental human rights are respected and to make their calls for democracy heard. In this connection, I wish to welcome this year's awarding of the Noble Peace Prize to three exceptional women who are doing outstanding work in the service of peace and human rights.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    The effective implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), on women and peace and security, is a priority for France, which actively worked for its adoption, just as we have worked to strengthen awareness of this issue at the European Union, especially during our 2008 presidency of the Union. Last year, France adopted a national plan of action on the implementation of the resolution. In particular, it aims at prioritizing, at the international level, the protection of women against all forms of violence and promoting respect for their basic rights, as well as their equal participation in decision-making processes in the context of peacebuilding, reconstruction and development.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    France has undertaken commitments in the context of its plan of action to strengthen women's direct participation in reconstruction efforts and the decision making process, namely, by focusing priority on access to leadership positions. In particular, France is implementing several cooperation programmes, in partnership with UN-Women, aimed at strengthening women's participation in the decision-making process, improving their access to, and participation in, the justice sector. We are doing that by relying on civil society organizations and, in particular, women's groups, which I would like here to commend. Those programmes are being carried out in Africa and the Arab world, as well as in Afghanistan. Moreover, France is developing programmes intended to bolster the participation of women in peacekeeping operations. Our plan of action also includes initiatives to improve awareness of the need for respect for the rights of women in the context of training programmes, which is another important element in the implementation of the resolution on women, peace and security.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    I would like to thank the Secretary-General for his recent report (S/2011/598*). We agree with the bulk of its analyses. We would also like to commend the work done by UN-Women under the leadership of Ms. Bachelet. The strategic framework and follow-up indicators referred to in the report are useful tools, both for Member States and for the United Nations, in following up the implementation of the resolution on women and peace and security. Not only do they make it possible to assess results, but also to identify shortcomings in women's participation in conflict prevention and resolution. They also make it possible to refocus the efforts of the international community to ensure better protection for women in armed conflict.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    We have seen progress in this regard in the past 10 years. To complement the resolution, the Council has put in place a framework that makes possible a more comprehensive approach to the protection of women and their participation in the resolution of conflicts. At the same time, the United Nations Secretariat and its agencies, funds and programmes, as well as other bodies of the Organization, now undertake more coordinated efforts. Ms. Bachelet's role has undoubtedly made a contribution in that regard. I also wish to commend the work and coordinating efforts of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, as well as his Special Representative on Children and Armed conflict for her respective contributions.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    We must continue to ensure that women play key roles in peacekeeping operations and political missions; we must not only look at gender as a thematic issue, but ensure that women hold key and responsible positions at every level. We endorse the recommendations of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations that a larger proportion of women be deployed in the military and police contingents of peacekeeping operations, and recruited into the armed forces and police services of Member States, with pre-deployment training for military and police on gender issues. It is through these actions that we can achieve the target of women constituting 20 per cent of peacekeeping operations by 2014, from the highest decision-making level to field operations.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    In addition, there must be dedicated budgets, targets, timelines and indicators aligned to national peacebuilding plans, overall national defence and security strategies or poverty reduction programmes. Focus in the post-conflict recovery phase must ensure that women's needs and rights are consistently addressed. My delegation supports the Secretary-General's recommendation that at least 15 per cent of United Nations funds for peacebuilding be dedicated to projects that address the specific needs of women and girls, advance gender equality and empower women. Adequate financing is vital to ensuring resources for gender training and support for non-governmental organizations and local groups that focus on issues of food security, nutrition, health and HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, education, and the rehabilitation and reintegration of women affected by war.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    Kazakhstan welcomes the drafting of a comprehensive set of indicators aimed at tracking implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), which can serve as benchmarks for standards to design and set in place a methodical monitoring system allowing countries to review their own structures and mechanisms and resource allocations. We must also condemn rape as a tactic of terror and war.

  • Country

    Kazakhstan
  • Extracts

    The flagship agency on gender — UN-Women — has begun to prove its leadership in theimplementation of resolution 1325 (2000) through United Nations system-wide coherence. It has been able to pulled together a set of key universal and regional human rights instruments. The focus on women and peace and security can be further strengthenedthrough collaboration with humanitarian, human rights and aid- to-development agencies, and the defence forces of concerned United Nations Member States, as well as with all categories of women, including activists, war victims, refugees, asylum-seekers and migrants. To conclude, we must go forward to strengthen resolution 1325 (2000), structured on the three main pillars of participation, protection and prevention, and is a most powerful tool for women's organizing, mobilization and action.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    We welcome the latest report of the Secretary-General (S/2011/598*), which for the first time measures the progress of implementing resolution 1325 (2000) against specific indicators.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    The Council must increase its efforts to incorporate a gender perspective in relevant country specific resolutions, with a view to increasing women's participation in peace negotiations and mediation and in meeting the specific concerns of women during post-conflict reconstruction. The Council must also, hand in hand with the General Assembly, address the lack of women as lead peace mediators by encouraging the Secretary-General to appoint women to such positions and to ensure that adequate gender expertise is provided for all United Nations-led peace processes.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    Liechtenstein honours its commitments to implementing resolution 1325 (2000), as pledged at the commitment conference “A call to action” on 25 September 2010. We continue to support international efforts to end impunity for the most serious crimes, including those committed against women during armed conflict. That commitment includes continued financial support to the Trust Fund for Victims established by the International Criminal Court (ICC), which adopts a gender-based perspective across all programming and specifically targets victims of all forms of sexual and gender violence.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Resolution 1325 (2000) is relevant to the implementation of Lithuania's foreign, security and development cooperation policy objectives, as well as our participation in international peacebuilding and peacekeeping missions. Lithuania was one of 38 Member States that contributed to the Secretary-General's report on women and peace and security (S/2011/598*).
  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Last June, women leaders from all parts of the world — Special Representative of the SecretaryGeneral Wallström among them — met in Vilnius at a conference entitled “Women Enhancing Democracy: Best Practices” under the Lithuanian presidency of the Community of Democracies, and shared their experiences and best practices in enhancing the role of women. The Working Group on Gender Equality and Women's Rights, co-chaired by the United States of America and Lithuania, discussed, among other priority issues, women and peace and security. The conference showed that, in many parts of the world, the involvement of women is still low. Indeed, women could and should play a bigger role in human rights and security monitoring and establish early warning systems to generate information about specific threats, peace talks, donor conferences, elections and decision- making.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    The Lithuanian National Programme on Equal Opportunities for Women and Men 2010-2014 raised, for the first time, gender issues in the national defence system and included measures for training gender experts who will now prepare Lithuanian personnel in this area for deployment to missions and operations. As announced by Lithuanian President Dalia Grybauskaitė during the General Assembly general debate in September (see A/66/PV.16), Lithuania drew up its first national action plan for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in 2011. We seek through the national action plan to facilitate outreach to our society concerning the aims of the resolution, to promote and protect women's rights, to encourage them to participate in international military and civil operations and missions, to involve more institutions and non-governmental organizations, and to streamline activities at all levels.
  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Lithuania attaches particular importance to conflict prevention. We support the first General Assembly resolution on strengthening the role of mediation in the peaceful settlement of disputes (resolution65/283), which, inter alia, advocates the enhanced role of women in peace mediation. We welcome the joint strategy on gender and mediation launched by the Department of Political Affairs and UNWomen, and look forward to its further implementation.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Successive chairmanships of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), including that of Lithuania, have sought to include gender issues within the scope of OSCE activities related to peace and security. Ministerial Council Decision 14/05 builds in part on resolution 1325 (2000) and calls for engaging women in conflict prevention, crisis management and post-conflict rehabilitation. In October, the OSCE held a major conference in Sarajevo entitled “UNSCR 1325: Moving Beyond Theory to Maximize Security in the OSCE”. This year, the Lithuanian OSCE Chairman-in-Office appointed his Special Representative on Gender Issues, Ms. Wendy Patten, to coordinate implementation of the 2004 OSCE Action Plan for the Promotion of Gender Equality.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    With respect to national action plans, we note with interest the references in the Secretary-General's report to the practices in some countries of providing for the production of shadow reports of civil society organizations as part of their monitoring mechanisms. Following the adoption of its national action plan, Lithuania intends to apply for membership in the Group of Friends of resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    The improvement of the status of women, in particular in countries with identified patterns of conflictrelated sexual violence, starts with addressing the very basic issues involved in enabling women to live a more decent life. The experience of Lithuania and other partner countries in Afghanistan, where Lithuania is leading a provincial reconstruction team, shows that women's empowerment and full participation at all levels of economic, political and social life are key not only to peace and security but also to poverty reduction, economic recovery and sustainable development. To cite but two examples, one project aims at consulting local medics and patients on midwifery and other women's health- related questions at the provincial hospital. Another important development project for local women and their organizations was dedicated to strengthening the capacity of the provincial administration and local non-governmental organizations to prepare and implement their own projects. Finally, Lithuania calls on the Security Council to use its authority to ensure that all resolutions, including those on mission mandates and their renewal, integrate and advance the women and peace and security agenda.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    Indeed, while acknowledging that important progress has been accomplished in the implementation of resolution 1325 and the subsequent resolutions on Women Peace and Security, we need to recognize that significant challenges still remain: women are still underrepresented at the several levels of peacekeeping and peacebuilding efforts as they are inadequately represented in formal peace negotiations. The exclusion of women from peace talks and peacebuilding efforts often means that insufficient attention is paid to addressing gender disparities and women's needs and concerns in the post conflict phase, thus reinforcing a circle of inequality and marginalization.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    In this regard, we welcome UN Women's efforts to give technical support to women's organizations and we recognize that much has been done with success at local and regional level to strengthen women's civil society groups. We also welcome every effort by Member States to promote women's political participation and to eliminate discriminatory or constitutional barriers against women. Further action is also needed on other obstacles that prevent women from participating fully in politics such as poverty, sexual violence, lack of access to education, negative societal attitudes, cultural and psychological barriers.
  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    This Council has also a key role to play in monitoring women's participation in political processes and I would take this opportunity to highlight once again the importance of inviting Michelle Bachelet to brief the Council on women's political participation in concrete situations in the agenda of the Council to complement the briefings that the Council receives from other parts of the Secretariat. We congratulate her warmly for the for the very important work she is carrying out, for her leadership and commitment and we wish here to reiterate our full support to her endeavours.
  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    To conclude, Madam President, Portugal has been striving to support the promotion and protection of the human rights of women but also women's political participation in situations in the agenda of the Council like in Libya, Somalia, South Sudan or in Afghanistan among others. This Council cannot afford to exclude the skills and talents of half of the world's population in the pursuit of peace. In this context, my country reaffirms its commitment to ensuring women's effective participation in peace and security and to translate this commitment into enhanced action. I thank you for your attention.
  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    The history of resolution 1325 (2000), more than ten years of it, has clearly confirmed in practice the key role and significance of this instrument for advancing the role of women in conflict prevention and resolution and in post-conflict reconstruction and also in protecting women during conflicts. In that regard we express how pleased we are that this year the issue of women's participation in preventive diplomacy is given priority attention in the Council's presidential statement.

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    In terms of the Security Council's Charter-based functions, its attention should be given only to those situations that represent a threat to international peace and security. Issues ofviolence against women should be considered in the Council only as they relate to themes of maintaining peace and security and in strict relation to those situations that are on the Council's agenda. We are convinced that that will guarantee the effective work of the Council to implement resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    We also suggest that artificially linking gender issues in all their ramifications exclusively to the Security Council contradicts its mandate and leads to imbalances in terms of system-wide coordination. Let us not forget also that this issue is dealt with not only by the Security Council but also by the General Assembly, the Peacebuilding Commission, the Human Rights Council and the Committee on the Status of Women. It is important that they not duplicate each other's mandates.

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    Nor are we convinced that it would be proper to establish a specialized mechanism under the Security Council to oversee the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). Clearly, what is needed is increasing the effectiveness of existing mechanisms within the system by improving their coordination and accountability under the leadership of UN-Women. We welcome the efforts, led by Ms. Bachelet, of that body to consolidate the work of various structures, offices and special procedures that are dealing with women's issues and peace and security. But it is still too early to assess the work of UN-Women, which began its work only ten months ago.

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    We have carefully studied the report of the Secretary-General (S/2011/598*) prepared for this meeting. We suggest that it would be proper to ensure that future reports reflect the multifaceted nature of violence against women, as is required by resolution 1325 (2000) itself. In particular, we call on the Secretary-General to give more attention to such important problems as killing and wounding of women and children, particularly as a result of indiscriminate or excessive use of force. Often such crimes go unpunished or are justified as being unavoidable or being so-called collateral damage. This contradicts provisions of the Geneva Convention, inter alia. The recent events in Libya are an example of this.

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    If required, we are ready to come back to this theme and provide details on what we actually mean by this. In this context, with regard to the first part of the report, with the indicators of the effective implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), we wish to stress that there are still open questions about the suitability and relevance of individual indicators and their scope and use. We also suggest that work on those indicators should be done in a more transparent and open way, with the involvement of all Member States, since, ultimately, they are of interest not just to the 15 States on the Council. This applies also to the annex to the report. The Council requested a strategic framework on the work of United Nations offices in implementing the resolution over the next ten years. We also suggest that the guarantee of effective work on the ground lies in taking into account the State-specific natures and needs. In conclusion, I should like once again to reiterate our conviction that guaranteeing women's protection and rights during armed conflict can be ensured only through the joint efforts of all interested parties. For us, resolution 1325 (2000) continues to serve as the frame of reference in that regard.

  • Country

    Ukraine
  • Extracts

    The eleventh anniversary of resolution 1325 (2000) is an opportunity to strengthen the global agenda on women and peace and security. We welcome the latest report of the Secretary-General on this issue (S/2011/598*) and take positive note of its recommendations. My country remains fully committed to the implementation of resolutions 1325 (2000), 1820 (2008) and 1888 (2009).

    Ukraine considers that ensuring gender equality, gender mainstreaming and the empowerment of women is not only an important objective, but is also an essential part of the pursuit of democracy and development. In recognition of the essential contribution of women towards achieving those objectives, Ukraine co-sponsored a draft resolution on women and political participation.

  • Country

    Ukraine
  • Extracts

    Despite all international efforts, women and girls continue to be the most vulnerable victims of armed conflicts, targeted with sexual violence, sexual exploitation and other forms of gender-based violence. Eliminating impunity is critical for preventing gender- based crimes. In 2010 Ukraine became a co-sponsor of Council resolution 1960 (2010), which concerned sexual violence in armed conflict. We remain ready to undertake further steps, in particular as a member of UN-Women.

  • Country

    Ukraine
  • Extracts

    Ukraine recognizes the instrumental role that a stronger United Nations gender architecture could play in advancing women's rights. It is a great responsibility for my country to be represented on the Executive Board of UN-Women. Ukraine's activity in this entity is focused on implementing policies and practices that seek to reduce gender inequality in all its manifestations in every sphere of life, including decision-making and leadership, the elimination of violence against women and girls, and trafficking in women and girls. We welcome the Council's efforts to pay special attention to the concrete needs of women and girls affected by armed conflicts in such spheres as health, education, legal support, and water and sanitation.

  • Country

    Ukraine
  • Extracts

    The focus of today's debate on the participation and role of women in conflict prevention and mediation could not be more timely. Ukraine has always stressed the need for the widest possible use of the potential of women in the spheres of preventive diplomacy, peacekeeping and peacebuilding. We believe that there is still much to be done to redress the current underrepresentation of women in decision- making with regard to conflict resolution so as to make their voice heard loud and clear in peace negotiations. In that context, we welcome the adoption of the first-ever resolution on “Strengthening the role of mediation in the peaceful settlement of disputes and conflict prevention and resolution” (General Assembly resolution 65/283). In that document, all Member States resolved to promote the equal, full and effective participation of women at all levels of the peaceful settlement of disputes, conflict prevention and resolution, as well as to provide adequate gender expertise for all mediators and their teams.

  • Country

    Ukraine
  • Extracts

    The importance of women's participation in peacebuilding can hardly be overestimated. The issue is one of the priorities of Ukraine as a member of the Organizational Committee of the Peacebuilding Commission (PBC) and one of it current Vice-Chairs. We see a great deal of merit in strengthening collaboration between the PBC and UN-Women in this field. From that perspective, Ukraine was one of the initiators of the first-ever joint high-level meeting of those bodies aimed at promoting advocacy for women's participation in peacebuilding, in line with the Secretary-General's thematic report.

  • Country

    Ukraine
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, Ukraine calls on Member States to renew their commitments under resolution 1325 (2000) and to launch new strategies to address gender equality issues in peace and security processes. Ukraine is resolved to do its share.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    Though we support the comprehensive PRST that will be adopted in this debate. I regret that because of the opposition of some, we were unable to unreservedly welcome the Secretary-General's report. The United Kingdom does whole-heartedly welcome that report. Women have a central role in building stability in countries at risk from conflict. Despite our collective efforts, they remain under-represented in peace processes, in work to detect early signs of conflict and in mediation between warring parties. Some progress has been made, but it is not until the participation of women is included throughout the conflict cycle that a durable and sustainable peace can be assured. This Council, of course, may not be the best body, with five distinguished female Permanent Representatives and Deputy Permanent Representatives, leaving the Council at the end of this year, there may be only two female PRs and DPRs next year around this table, both from the United States.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    I have three points to make in today's debate: first, support for the role of UN Women and Special Representatives of the Secretary General (SRSG) on Sexual Violence in Conflict; second, the need to do more on conflict prevention and early warning; and finally, the work that the United Kingdom has taken forward through our National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    Since taking up her position as Under Secretary General and Executive Director of UN Women, Michelle Bachelet has passionately and effectively promoted the Women, Peace and Security agenda. Supported by Special Representatives Radhika Coomaraswamy and Margot Wallstrom, UN Women plays a vital role coordinating wider international efforts to implement the full suite of UN resolutions on Women Peace and Security. We commend, in particular, the efforts to improve systematic reporting of progress through the development of indicators and a strategic framework, including the Strategic Framework of UN Action against Sexual Violence in Conflict. In July, the United Kingdom pledged $16 million over a 2 year period to UN Women to support this important work.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    In Afghanistan, the UK has funded a full range of measures undertaken by the Criminal Justice Task Force to minimise gender-related barriers to working in a high profile law enforcement environment. And we supported the Government of Nepal's efforts to develop its own National Action Plan to generate, among many other things, work to provide support for women and girls who have been the victims of sexual violence. We encourage more countries to develop National Action Plans in order to strengthen the implementation of Resolution 1325 and associated resolutions.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    Madam President, a word on National Action Plans: The United Kingdom believes that National Action Plans provide an important opportunity for member states to make their own commitments to reduce the impact of conflict on women and girls and to promote their inclusion in conflict resolution. Over the past year, the United Kingdom has supported efforts globally to implement Resolution 1325.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    Over the past several years, the United Nations and its member states have taken important steps to increase women's participation in issues related to peace and security. We established UN Women and the Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary General for Sexual Violence in Conflict. Through this Council's work, we defined what we expect of parties to conflict with respect to the protection of women. We established a framework to track implementation of Resolution 1325. Many states, including my country, are developing national action plans to guide their engagement on issues of women, peace, and security. But all this is just a beginning. We must ensure that norms and institutional frameworks turn into action. What counts now is implementation and delivering results.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    The Secretary-General's report provides examples of both real progress and the challenges ahead of us. We welcome the initiative of DPKO and DPA to include gender components, advisors, or focal points in all field missions on this issue. We're pleased that a gender and mediation specialist has been appointed to the Standby Team of Mediation Experts to ensure that women's concerns are addressed in conflict prevention and resolution, and not just toward the end of a conflict, as is often the case. And we are encouraged that a growing number of reports to the Security Council, as well as mission mandate renewal resolutions, address issues related to women in conflict and post-conflict situations. However, as the Secretary-General noted, "mere reference to women, peace and security resolutions is not enough." We must give UN entities strong support to implement and deliver results for gender equality.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    More can be done to ensure that personnel of UN missions are adequately prepared to implement resolution 1325 and supported in their efforts. Both pre-deployment training and mission-wide strategies on the protection of civilians, including the needs of vulnerable groups such as women and girls, need to be improved. Gaps also remain in ensuring that those serving in UN missions are held accountable for their performance, particularly in the case of sexual exploitation and abuse. As the Secretary-General acknowledged, "the UN still lacks a system that enables complaints of sexual exploitation and abuse to be reported safely." The United Nations needs to lead by example by actively enforcing the zero tolerance policy on sexual exploitation and abuse by UN peacekeepers. Conflict-related sexual violence must be addressed from the very start in peace processes, and more women should be included as mediators and members of negotiating teams.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    Madame President, the United States is developing a National Action Plan to accelerate implementation of Resolution 1325 across our government and with partners in civil society. The plan will be centered on the four pillars of Resolution 1325: participation; prevention; protection; and relief and recovery.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    In the Participation Pillar, the U.S. supported Afghan women's inclusion in the High Peace Council and in follow-on shuras and negotiations, in the reintegration and reconciliation process at the local level. We've also awarded $16.9 million in direct grants to Afghan women-focused NGOs. In the Protection Pillar, the U.S. contributed roughly $2 million to the office of the Special Representative of the Secretary General for sexual violence and conflict. We have provided numerous courses to foreign militaries on human rights, prevention of gender-based violence, sexual exploitation, and protection of civilians.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    In the Prevention Pillar, the U.S. has developed multiple programs that seek to address the root causes of conflict, including a $26 million annual Reconciliation Program that supports innovative programming in conflict-affected countries and includes gender analysis. In the Relief and Recovery Pillar, the U.S. has provided significant funding to improve water and sanitation in situations in which women's safety and security are at risk.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    Madame President, as we move forward on our National Action Plan, we are cognizant that, as Secretary Clinton said at a Council debate on this issue last year, "ultimately, we measure our progress by the improvements in the daily lives of people around the world. This must be our cause – and empowering women to contribute all their talents to this cause is our calling." All of us now face the critical challenge of turning our commitments on women, peace, and security into results. Through our work here in this Council, and our national efforts, we believe that we can meet this challenge together.
  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    The United Nations and its Member States need to further increase the number of women in peacekeeping operations and political missions in order to ensure gender expertise in the planning of missions and in all mediation efforts, and to enhance the appointment of women to senior leadership positions. The Secretary-General's seven-point action plan on women's participation in peacebuilding (see S/2010/466) contains important commitments in that regard, and we encourage the United Nations system to take them forward.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    In order to be able to guide and track the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) by the United Nations system over the next 10 years, Austria very much welcomes the strategic framework contained in the latest report of the Secretary-General (S/2011/598*). The formulation of concrete medium and long-term targets is an important step. Austria is convinced that the comprehensive set of indicators that received the Council's support at the open debate one year ago is not only essential for monitoring the strategic framework, but should also be used to track efforts at the national level. We fully support the recommendations in the Secretary-General's report, including the call for more frequent briefings of the Council by Executive Director Bachelet, as well as by relevant Special Representatives of the Secretary-General. Of course, the inclusion of women, peace and security aspects in country-specific reports to the Council, including reporting on attacks on women journalists, women human rights defenders and women in public office, is equally important to providing the Council with the necessary information to act upon.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    Austria has almost finished the revision of its national action plan on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), which will be approved by the Council of Ministers by the end of this year. As for the first national action plan of 2007, civil society has been closely involved in these efforts. The revised national action plan will be guided by the set of indicators that were presented by the Secretary-General and supported by the Security Council last year. Mission gender advisors have been trained and deployment to the Balkans has begun. Austria has also followed up on its commitment to provide more adequate training for our peace workers in the field. Standard training elements on gender have been finalized and their implementation in education and pre-deployment training for our soldiers and civilian personnel will be completed in 2012. Austria has also made significant progress on its commitment to incorporate the provisions of the statute of the International Criminal Court that classifies crimes against women as crimes against humanity, war crimes or genocide, as part of our national criminal code. Austria has continued its support to UN-Women and is currently exploring opportunities for cooperation with partner countries to support the development of a national action plan.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    The women and peace and security agenda has been a catalyst for greater civil society engagement with the Council. This has enriched our work, giving us access to new perspectives and information. In all societies, there are real obstacles to women's political participation. Even in countries that have championed women's rights for decades, insidious barriers to true equality persist. Today we gather to consider how to advance further towards women's full engagement in conflict resolution and mediation.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    Brazil is encouraged by the progress made in taking forward the indicators on women and peace and security. We underline the importance of their close adherence to the letter of the relevant Security Council resolutions. Indicators, however, are not an end in themselves. They help us to gain a better understanding of the situations and to assess progress made towards our goals. In that context, we welcome and support the strategic framework that the Secretary-General has presented to guide the United Nations implementation of resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    I would like to conclude by stressing a crucial point. The Council's support to empowering women in conflict and post-conflict situations is very important. However, it cannot stand on its own. The effective and sustainable political participation of women depends on social inclusion and economic opportunity. The work of the General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council and UN-Women in this regard requires our full support if we are to achieve the goals of the women and peace and security agenda.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    As a member of the “Group of Friends of Security Council Resolution 1325” Germany has always attached great importance to all aspects of the issue “Women and Peace and Security” – in particular to turn, 11 years after the adoption of this ground breaking resolution, words into action. Therefore, we applaud the timely decision of the Nobel Prize Committee to honor three courageous and inspirational women who are exemplary models of how women can make a difference. Germany very much welcomes the Secretary General's comprehensive report and the analysis and recommendations it contains, including the strategic framework and the first set of indicators which he brought forward.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    The PRST to be adopted today clearly recognizes once again the significant role of women in prevention, conflict resolution and post conflict rebuilding. Including women in peace initiatives is not a benevolent act, we see it as a key requirement to any lasting, sustainable peace. Women's participation will strengthen the capacity to resolve conflict and build security and justice systems that protect the human rights of all. However, we have still existing gaps between repeated commitments and the situation on the ground. Women remain severely under-represented in peace negotiations and they are often marginalized in efforts to build sustainable peace.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    What can be done to close this gap? First, in regard to the UN level, we commend UN Women for its work in leading the mainstreaming efforts to include, wherever possible, a gender perspective in UN activities and measuring progress made in implementing resolution 1325 against the indicators. It is crucial to constantly strive for more women in leading positions, also within the UN, and to give women a voice during all stages of peace processes. There is a clear link between women's participation in the early stages of preventive diplomacy, peace-making or peace-building and their presence in implementation mechanisms.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Second, at the level of EU and NATO: Both within the European Common Foreign and Security Policy and NATO, the implementation of 1325 in relation to conflict resolution has progressed. Forces are better informed on gender issues. And we are beginning to see the benefits of a new awareness and understanding where it matters - in the communities where soldiers are deployed. Female military medical staff serving in field hospitals lower the barriers for local women to seek treatment and female soldiers gain better access to local women.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Third, with regard to the national level: Last year the German Government presented its third report to Parliament on its implementation of SR resolution 1325. It contains, inter alia, projects on gender training, including for UN peacekeepers, prevention of sexual violence, enabling women's participation in peace-processes as well as their unhindered access to justice. A special focus lies on the support for women's organizations and NGOs in promoting women's empowerment. In addition, the German Government has set up action plans on “gender in development aid programmes” and on “civilian crisis prevention”. Germany implements the indicators adopted by the European Union in 2010.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Fourth and last, the Security Council could do more to systematically integrate women, peace and security issues in its daily work, including when mandating or renewing UN missions. Envoys and Special Representatives should address those issues, where relevant, in their briefings to the Council. I would like to conclude, Madam President, by expressing Germany's support for the presidential statement adopted today.
  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    While the passage of Resolution 1325 and the four subsequent resolutions represented a paradigm shift in relation to women and conflict, there remains a striking reluctance in many quarters to include women as full and equal partners in peace efforts. Of the nine peace agreements signed during the course of 2010, only two had provisions ensuring women's rights. There is a basic design flaw that needs to be addressed. Peace processes in general are not set up to engage non-traditional actors like women's groups or other civil society organisations. That must change. Processes need to be structured from the outset to draw more fully on non-formal and non-traditional influences where women, woven into the social fabric of societies, have so much to offer. The mediation phase, when things remain in flux, presents a good opportunity to empower and include such groups. As the Secretary-General points out in his report, it is critical that women peace-builders and mediators are engaged as early as possible in the conflict prevention/resolution cycle.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    Our watchwords must be delivery and urgency. Good intentions and solemn commitments are of value only to the extent that they are acted upon. All of us must step up to the plate: UN actors – including the Secretary-General, UN Women, DPA, PBSO – all need to sustain and intensify their efforts; The Security Council should give clear and consistent messages and lead by example; Member States must recognise how far they are falling short in their responsibility to promote full participation of women at all levels in conflict prevention and resolution, and take appropriate remedial action.
  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    Ireland's principal pledge at last year's debate on women, peace and security was to develop, adopt and launch a National Action on Resolution 1325. I am pleased to announce that Ireland has recently adopted a National Action Plan, and that this plan will be officially launched in the coming weeks. The Plan was informed by a cross-learning initiative that brought together women from Timor-Leste, Liberia, Ireland and Northern Ireland to discuss the most critical issues facing women and girls in conflict and post-conflict settings. As we implement our National Action Plan, Ireland will continue to listen to the voices of women affected by conflict, to strengthen institutional capacities through comprehensive training of personnel deploying overseas, and to support programmes that promote women's participation. In their Peace Prize citation earlier this month, the Nobel Committee wrote that "we cannot achieve democracy and lasting peace in the world unless women obtain the same opportunities as men to influence developments at all levels of society". That is not just a worthy sentiment in a citation – it is a bald statement of reality, and one that demands our full and urgent attention.
  • Country

    Kyrgyzstan
  • Extracts

    Kyrgyzstan welcomes the report of the Secretary-General (S/2011/598*) and his recommendations, including the strategic framework to clearly guide actions to implement resolution 1325 (2000) at the national, regional and global levels in the next 10 years.

  • Country

    Kyrgyzstan
  • Extracts

    Kyrgyzstan has made significant headway over the past two years in promoting the participation of women in the country's political life, conducting democratic reforms and peace-based initiatives. The 2010 national referendum resulted in the election of the first female president in Central Asia. Today, women occupy nearly one-third of the parliamentary seats. They also hold the posts of President of the Supreme Court, Prosecutor General and President of the National Bank. Women also hold posts as ministers, governors and heads of various non-governmental organizations.

  • Country

    Kyrgyzstan
  • Extracts

    Following the inter-ethnic conflict in southern Kyrgyzstan in 2010, special importance was given to supporting female initiatives in the area of conflict resolution, peacebuilding and post-conflict reconstruction. In that difficult time, women activists joined together to form women's peacekeeping networks in order to put an end to conflict and violence and to prevent a recurrence of the tragic events.

    My country notes the timely and swift reaction of the United Nations Peacebuilding Fund, which funded projects to promote national reconciliation and post- conflict reconstruction. Today, the women's peacekeeping network includes 20 local women's peace committees and serves as the link between local communities and the central Government.
    Kyrgyzstan believes that the key role in coordinating agreed measures on women's participation in conflict prevention and peacebuilding efforts should be played by the new entity UN-Women. Through close partnerships with UN-Women, UNICEF, the United Nations Development Programme and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, in May the network of Kyrgyzstan women peacekeepers began to implement 11 projects aimed at fostering inter-ethnic harmony and ensuring peace in post-conflict areas of Kyrgyzstan. We also consider it necessary to more actively promote that component in the action strategy of the United Nations Regional Centre for Preventive Diplomacy for Central Asia.
  • Country

    Kyrgyzstan
  • Extracts

    Kyrgyzstan believes that United Nations peacekeeping operations serve as the main tool for maintaining peace in conflict zones. In that respect, my country supports the efforts to enhance the role of women in the field missions of peacekeeping operations. It would be relevant to expand the targeted training programme for women to relevant positions in United Nations peacekeeping missions.

    In the future, Kyrgyzstan intends to increase the number of women serving in the military and police contingents of United Nations peacekeeping operations. We have developed draft legislation on principles and procedures for the participation of the Kyrgyz Republic in the maintenance of international peace and security, which also incorporates a gender perspective.

  • Country

    Kyrgyzstan
  • Extracts

    Preventive actions in post-conflict countries, including comprehensive reform of judicial and law enforcement systems, are important as the only way to ensure the rule of law and better protection of the rights of women, particularly in protecting them from violence and increasing their participation in the law enforcement sector. My country believes that positive experience in that area must be mainstreamed and disseminated.

  • Country

    Kyrgyzstan
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, I would like to point out that work has begun on a draft national strategy on achieving gender equality in the Kyrgyz Republic by 2020, as well as a draft national plan of action on achieving gender equality for the period 2012-2014. Those documents will stipulate further measures for strengthening the role of women in the area of peace and security, including in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    We commend you, Madam President, on your concept note (S/2011/654, annex) focusing on the role of women in conflict prevention and mediation.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    We thank the Secretary-General and Under- Secretary-General Michelle Bachelet for their briefings on the efforts undertaken by the United Nations system over the past year to implement the women and peace and security agenda.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    We welcome the Secretary-General's conclusions in his recent report (S/2011/598*) that the indicators proposed last year (S/2010/498), which were endorsed by the Council in its presidential statement of 26 October 2010 (S/PRST/2010/22), had made a major contribution to consistency and coherence in international efforts. We appreciate the Secretary- General's candid assessment of the challenges that lie ahead and support his observations and recommendations. We must focus our efforts even more on implementing the normative framework created over the past 11 years. The strategic results framework is the right tool to accurately measure progress or the absence of it. We encourage the Secretary-General to continue to collect data based on the set of indicators presented in his 2010 report. At the same time, we encourage the entire United Nations system and all Member States to help the Secretary-General to implement his zero-tolerance policy on sexual exploitation and abuse perpetrated by the Blue Helmets. Beyond the suffering of women and girls, which we have a moral obligation to prevent, the credibility of the Organization and of our efforts in peacekeeping and peacebuilding in general is at stake.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    Allow me, in my capacity as Chair of the Guinea configuration of the Peacebuilding Commission, to highlight the role that Guinean women must play in the establishment of democracy in Guinea, and specifically in national reconciliation efforts in their country, which was wounded by decades of authoritarian rule and military dictatorship. The Peacebuilding Commission is striving to assist Guinea to fully integrate women into all political processes and into economic and social life. In that context, I encourage the Secretary-General to push the entire United Nations system to pursue, with even stronger determination, the implementation of his seven-point action plan on the role of women in peacebuilding. In his report on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) under consideration, the Secretary-General outlines a few areas of progress, but he also acknowledges that progress is slow in an area of particular interest for today's debate — the participation of women in mediation efforts — and in the area of women's economic integration. At this stage, we do not have sufficient data to measure progress towards the goal of allocating 15 per cent of all United Nations-managed funds in support of peacebuilding to gender equality and women's empowerment.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    Luxembourg continues to place great importance on the plight of women in crisis situations and on mainstreaming the gender dimension into the work of international and regional organizations in that respect. Last December, Luxembourg decided to fund a major project of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations that is aimed at strengthening women's leadership and participation in political life and in peacebuilding activities in countries emerging from conflict. With our support, concrete results are being achieved in three countries — Timor-Leste, Haiti and the Democratic Republic of the Congo — through partnerships forged between national and local authorities and United Nations missions and agencies. We are determined to maintain and to reinforce that national commitment. By strengthening the role of women in conflict prevention and mediation, we will help to improve society as a whole.

  • Country

    Solomon Is.
  • Extracts

    One of the six main goals of the UN-Women strategic plan, 2011-2013 (see UNW/2011/9), deals with women's leadership in peace, security and humanitarian response. That plan has outcomes with targets and indicators by which we can measure progress over time.

  • Country

    Solomon Is.
  • Extracts

    As a country emerging from conflict, we have put in place a number of peace and security initiatives. We have adopted traditional and external mechanisms. We have borrowed the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission model, which has a gender chapter to it. I am pleased to say that during its work it has accumulated data relevant to resolution 1325 (2000) that we will feed into our national policy framework when the Commission's mandate comes to a natural end next year.

  • Country

    Solomon Is.
  • Extracts

    Given our lack of capacity and resources, much of the work on gender in Solomon Islands is externally supported and heavily consultant-driven. That said, our homegrown faith-based gender components have been in existence for the past couple of decades. We are assisted by the Regional Assistance Mission to the Solomon Islands (RAMSI). Gender equality is factored into the Mission, led by Australia and supported by New Zealand and all our Pacific neighbours. I am pleased to say that by the end of this year, RAMSI will have a new coordinator, who is a Tongan professional woman.

  • Country

    Solomon Is.
  • Extracts

    Our concern is that the United Nations gender- supported early warning system initiative, initiated years back, unfortunately did not grow roots nationally and went silent after completion of the project. In that regard, we have been calling for an enhanced United Nations presence in Solomon Islands to ensure that there is a permanent partnership in transferring projects within the country.

    Nationally, two ministries are leading the charge in implementing resolution 1325 (2000), namely, the Ministry of National Unity, Reconciliation and Peace and the Ministry of Women, Youth and Children's Affairs. Their work on gender goes beyond resolution 1325 (2000), as has been clarified in the concept paper (S/2011/654, annex). It covers the other resolutions, 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010).

  • Country

    Solomon Is.
  • Extracts

    We are in a transitional phase of providing and improving women's access to food, water, health, education and economic opportunities. The Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2011-2020 has a gender orientation to it. It calls for investment in the productive sector within our countries, especially in infrastructure, agriculture and energy, with the ambitious goal to transform and graduate 50 per cent of LDCs by 2020. As my colleague from Vanuatu will state later on, the Pacific SIDS are developing a regional action plan on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), which will be complemented by a national action plan. On that note, Solomon Islands wishes to register its appreciation to UN-Women, which has provided financing to assist us in working on our national action plan.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    Spain welcomes the report of the Secretary- General (S/2011/598*) and fully supports its recommendations, as well as the ambitious programme of quantified objectives and the strategic results framework annexed to it. It is fundamental that the Security Council not only dedicates efforts to thematic debates and continues to strengthen the regulatory framework on women and peace and security, but also that it mainstreams the issue in all its work and decisions.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    In addition, my delegation once again welcomes the work of UN-Women and its Executive Director, Michelle Bachelet, in that area. We hope that, by continuing the fruitful cooperation already under way with other departments, agencies and programmes of the system, that entity has the central place that it merits in addressing the issue. For that, it can count on my country's full support.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    My country drew up an action plan on women, peace and security in 2007, which it has since updated twice. The effective implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions requires a significant cooperation effort, with the participation of six ministries, as well as constant and fluid contacts with civil society organizations, involved throughout the process, including the practical implementation of concrete actions. An action programme on women and peacebuilding, applicable to post-conflict situations in a cross-cutting way, is also included in the master plan for Spanish cooperation, in the context of the strategy on gender and development.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    Regarding specific recent actions, allow me to highlight the first version of an international course on a gender comprehensive approach to operations, organized by the Ministries of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation and of Defence of my country, in cooperation with their counterpart departments of the Government of the Netherlands, and held from 14 to 18 June in Madrid. The course focuses on implementing the international community's appeals, specifically resolution 1960 (2010), and also the recommendations of the NATO Lisbon Summit, to invest greater efforts in the training of civil and military employees on gender issues. Through practical exercises, it focuses on the integration of the gender perspective in civilian and military peacekeeping operations in various kinds of conflicts. Professional academic, military and civilian speakers of the United Nations, NATO and European Union took part in the course.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    In the same spirit of cooperation between the Administration and civil society, we are already working on new training activities that are largely inspired by the recommendations of the most recent report of the Secretary-General. Those activities will be collected in the third revision of the Spanish action plan, whose drafting is already under way.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    We welcome the concept note on women's participation and role in conflict prevention and mediation (S/2011/654). Let me also state that we welcome with satisfaction the progress that UN-Women has achieved under Ms. Bachelet's visionary leadership.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    Since the adoption of landmark resolution 1325 (2000), progress has been achieved across a broad range of issues aimed at enhancing the protection and promotion of the rights of women and girls in conflict- affected situations. A stronger gender perspective in post-conflict processes, as well as in United Nations programming and reporting, has been steadily built. The issues of gender equality and the empowerment of women have become critical components of political deliberations and actions. All in all, a better understanding is taking hold. We heartily welcome and commend the United Nations entities, non- governmental organizations and women's organizations that are working selflessly in this area. Yet as today's debate and the Secretary-General's report have shown us, there remain formidable challenges before us. Many structural and institutional impediments persist. Women continue to be largely marginalized in the national and international decision- making spheres because of persistent challenges, such as discriminatory laws, cultural stereotypes, lack of education, inability to access basic services, and sparse economic opportunities, to name a few. We firmly believe that the participation of women and the incorporation of gender perspectives in all contexts are vitally

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    In this context, we are particularly pleased to note that the interconnection between security and development has been acknowledged by the international community in broader terms. Millennium Development Goal 3 — promoting gender equality and the empowerment of women — will no doubt help emphasize the effectiveness of the efforts in this area. I should also recall that the Programme of Action (see A/66/134) agreed on at the Fourth United Nations Conference on the Least-Developed Countries in Istanbul in May proposes a number of joint actions on gender equality and the empowerment of women, concrete steps to be taken jointly by least-developed countries and their development partners.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    The positive ramifications of increasing women's participation in every context and at every stage of political transition are widely recognized and critically important. Situations of political transition should be perceived as providing opportunities for enhancing women's roles in decision-making at every level. It is equally important to redouble our efforts to combat impunity. Unfortunately, armed conflict and post- conflict disorder hit women and children the hardest. Targeted measures should be directed at the perpetrators of sexual violence and rape. We should all ensure that effective international mechanisms are established to respond to such crimes and bring their perpetrators to justice.

  • Country

    Burundi
  • Extracts

    The political will of the Government of Burundi to promote gender equity and gender equality is well established. Indeed Burundi has subscribed to international agreements such as the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and other international conventions and agreements on equality and non-discrimination on the basis of gender, and has implemented a national gender policy.

  • Country

    Burundi
  • Extracts

    To implement resolution 1325 (2000), the Government of Burundi has decided that no strategy will be adopted or implemented without taking into clear account the gender dimension, so as to guarantee the full participation of women in decision-making, in prioritizing plans of action and in implementing them. As things stand, our National Plan of Action on resolution 1325 (2000) has been drafted and its adoption by the Council of Ministers is expected next month. The plan is designed to respond to the Government's national and international priorities, which are reflected in national policy documents, such as the “Strategic Framework for Combating Poverty, Second Generation”, “Vision 2025” and the revised version of the national gender policy. The substance of resolution 1325 (2000) on women and peace and security is chiefly built around four pillars — participation, prevention, protection and recovery. In terms of participation in decision-making, Burundi has made significant progress. For example, the 30 per cent rate stipulated by the country's Constitution has been exceeded during the post- election nominations in 2010. Nine of the 21 ministerial positions are currently held by women — equal to 43 per cent. With that percentage Burundi leads the rest of Africa. Our rate of women's representation in the Senate places Burundi in first place in Africa and in second place worldwide, after Bolivia.

  • Country

    Burundi
  • Extracts

    In the area of prevention and protection, the Government of Burundi has taken stern measures to discourage abuse of girls as wives or sex slaves, by instituting a police unit for minors and morality under the ministry that handles public security. As part of the fight against gender-based violence, training sessions are regularly conducted for the military and the national police forces. On top of everything else, a national strategy to fight gender-based violence has been drawn up and will soon be adopted by the Government. The implementation of that strategy will, however, require strong support from the international community.

  • Country

    Burundi
  • Extracts

    In terms of recovery, the Government encourages women to form associations, so as to be able to receive assistance and support from the Administration and other benefactors. As part of implementation of the action plan under resolution 1325 (2000), the Government would like to establish a support fund for income-generating initiatives in order to enhance the economic power of women. The Government also encourages women entrepreneurs to create organizations, as that will facilitate the search for funding to bolster their companies and their management capacities.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    First, to avoid and reduce the harm suffered by women in armed conflict, it is first necessary to prevent war and reduce conflicts. The Security Council bears the primary responsibility of maintaining international peace and security. To safeguard women's rights and interests, the Council should conduct active preventive diplomacy and promote the use of means such as dialogue, consultations and negotiations for the peaceful settlement of disputes. Council resolutions, especially its mandate for civilian protection, should be strictly implemented so as to avoid more casualties among women and children.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Secondly, ensuring the participation of women in conflict resolution and prevention and in rehabilitation and reconstruction is an important part of the efforts to implement resolution 1325 (2000). China supports a bigger role for women in good offices and dispute mediation. We hope the Secretary-General will appoint more female special representatives and special envoys, and we hope to see greater participation by women in United Nations good offices and mediation concerning major international and regional hotspots.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Thirdly, in conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction, the national ownership of the government and people concerned must be respected. The international community can provide constructive help, but it must adhere to the United Nations Charter and the principle of non-interference in internal affairs. In safeguarding the rights and interests of women and enhancing their role in peace and security, specific national conditions and historical and cultural differences must be fully taken into account. A uniform approach is not desirable.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Fourthly, in advancing the agenda of women, peace and security, the relevant United Nations organs should collaborate while working in their respective spheres of competence. The Council should, in accordance with its Charter mandate, focus its attention on situations that threaten international peace and security. At the same time, the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) also requires organs such as the General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council and the Human Rights Council to fully play their roles. China appreciates the leading role of UN-Women and looks forward to its greater contribution to the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    In October of last year Estonia adopted its first National Action Plan for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and its follow-up resolutions, which sets out our priorities for the future. We are now in the process of reviewing the implementation of the Action Plan over the past year. The purpose of the National Action Plan is to ensure that Estonia's international military and civil contributions and development cooperation take women's needs systematically into account. It contains commitments to include the gender perspective in those activities.

    One of the countries closely connected to the implementation of our Action Plan has been Afghanistan, where NATO and Estonia have jointly endeavoured to promote the involvement and advancement of women. In November 2010, Estonia organized an international conference, entitled “Women, Peace and Security — the Afghan View”, focused on the cooperation between national and international contributors.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    The National Action Plan also includes Estonia's commitments regarding resolution 1325 (2000) that stem from our role as a contributor to international peace and security through our active participation in international civilian and military operations, as a donor country and a member of the European Union, NATO, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) and the United Nations.

    The Action Plan also seeks to raise general awareness and interest in gender-related issues in our own society and to increase gender-related expertise. We support women's participation in posts related to peace and security and will take further steps to increase women's participation in military, police and rescue services. In the future, we would like to integrate the gender perspective into our pre-mission training even more. It is also our aim to consider gender-related issues during the general training of officers and non-commissioned officers.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    We welcome the United Nations strategic results framework and the set of indicators on women and peace and security, which guide the implementation of resolutions, and we also welcome the comprehensive report on the NATO/ Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council policy on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and related resolutions. In addition, we believe that the International Criminal Court has an important role to play in ending impunity in crimes against women.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    Finally, let me note our appreciation of the work of Ms. Michelle Bachelet, Executive Director of UN-Women, whose leadership in that role is of crucial importance to the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). We also expect that UN-Women will play an active role in helping to turn the principles of resolution 1325 (2000) on women and peace and security from words on paper into reality. I would also like to extend our appreciation to the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict and to the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Children and Armed Conflict for their involvement.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    Japan expects UN-Women, in cooperation with other partners including the Department of Political Affairs, to coordinate and strengthen the efforts of the United Nations system in this area and provide guidance to regional organizations and Member States in their efforts in mediation.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    The promotion of women's participation in peacekeeping and peacebuilding is key to the protection and empowerment of women. The strengthening of gender expertise and perspectives in peacekeeping activities and increasing the number of female peacekeepers remain a challenge. In that regard, Japan deployed a female military liaison officer to the United Nations Integrated Mission in Timor-Leste this year. We also provide gender training to Japanese personnel before they are deployed to peacekeeping operations. This year, through the United Nations Development Programme, Japan is supporting a project to promote the employment of female police off