Security Council Open Debate on Women, Peace and Security, October 2013

Friday, October 18, 2013

OVERVIEW

On October 18th, the UN Security Council held its annual open debate on women,peace and security entitled Women, Rule of Law and Transitional Justice in Conflict-Affected Situations. The Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, the Under-Secretary-General and Executive Director of UN Women Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, and the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay briefed. Brigitte Balipou, the founder of the Association of Women Jurists of the CentralAfrican Republic, spoke on behalf of the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security and the civil society. The debate was presided by Azerbaijan.

The meeting resulted in unanimous adoption of a resolution (S/RES/2122), which is the seventh text adopted by the Council on the Women, Peace and Security agenda. The debate featured 4 opening remarks and 63 statements, including the statements made on behalf of the European Union, the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation and the African Union. Overall, the speakers focused on judicial reform and women's participation in this process, as well as the need to increase women's participation in decision-making and peacekeeping processes. The most frequently mentioned fragile states were Syria and the DRC.

RESOLUTION 2122

The adoption of resolution 2122, which is primarily focused on increasing women's participation in conflict prevention and all areas of peace processes brings us a step closer towards achieving full implementation of resolution 1325 on women, peace and security by the Security Council. The resolution is built on the 2013 Secretary General's Report (S/2013/525) which highlighted the progress achieved across several areas, while it also depicted persisting challenges to the implementation of the Women, Peace and Security agenda. Resolution 2122 is a sign of the Council's willingness to accord greater systematic attention to the implementation of this agenda to its own work, and we are pleased to see that the resolution text recognises the need to address the full scope of women's human rights violation rather than sexual and gender based violence alone.

We welcome the language on women's participation and its emphasis on the connection between women's participation in decision-making processes, women's security and durable peace, but would have liked to see more capacity building language as well.

Click here for a more detailed analysis of the resolution 2122.

TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE / RULE OF LAW

The civil society speaker Ms Balipou, who briefed the Council on the plight affecting her country the Central African Republic, was one of only four speakers to state that peace agreements should not contain amnesties for crimes against women. She also spoke in favor of ensuring women's political participation in electoral processes both as candidates and voters, the provision of reparations to victims that seek to transform gender inequalities, and gender sensitive justice infrastructure reform that will increase women's access to justice. Like Ms Balipou, most states mentioned gender sensitive justice sector reform and women's full and meaningful participation in the reform processes as an essential pre-requisite to sustainable peace and the restoration of rule of law. Additionally, almost all states called for increased participation of women at all levels of transitional justice processes and post conflict reconstruction, particularly in leadership and decision-making positions. The Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon, Ms. Pillay and numerous states including Egypt, Botswana, Estonia and the EU urged the Council to deal with the full scope of human rights' violations, including those of socio-economic nature, which constitutes a mark of progress on this subject. Latvia, Pakistan, China, Uruguay and others specifically expressed demands for economic empowerment of women. The SG furthermore declared special measures such as quotas could help women engage in the design and delivery of transitional justice as well as to increase their participation in all of post-conflict mediation, peacekeeping and peace-building. This remark represents a certain readiness within the UN system to take more tangible action towards gender mainstreaming rather than just paying lip service.

Few states including France, Pakistan and Brazil made progressive remarks about the importance of viewing women as active agents and drivers of change rather than mere victims. Almost all of the states including Pakistan, Turkey, Namibia and Botswana made some form of reference to the continuing threat of SGBV, or what the Rwandan representative had called ‘sexual terrorism', and the need to hold the perpetrators of these crimes accountable. Many states including Liechtenstein, South Africa, Netherlands, Argentina and the Democratic Republic of Korea commented on the important role played by the International Criminal Court, commending its efforts on this front thus far. Other states including Croatia and Slovenia stressed that the primary responsibility for investigating these crimes and persecuting those responsible falls on nation states, and there were several demands for the strengthening of national legislatures in order to do this effectively. The UNHR High Commissioner Navi Pillay warned that meaningful justice must include the provision of reparations as well as the prosecution of criminals, both of which are necessary to ensure lasting reconciliation. The vast majority of states called for better access to justice for women.

 

CONFLICT PREVENTION

The Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon started off the debate by commenting on the ‘central importance of women's participation in conflict prevention'. He also made an unprecedented move to stress the ubiquitous nature of GBV by emphasizing how ‘forms of gender-based violence in wartime are based on the private violence against women in many homes'. This stressed its root cause of global gender discrimination and inequality. In line with WILPF's integrated approach, the UNHRHC Navi Pillay stated her support for the Secretary-General's recommendation to foster closer links between the United Nation's peace and security, human rights and development work. Latvia, Nigeria and Australia echoed the High Commissioner's appreciation for these links.

The UN Women Executive Director Ms. Mlambo-Ngcuka advised member states that ensuring lasting peace depends on inviting women to participate in peace mediation and peacekeeping. Most states including Qatar, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Italy joined her calls for increased participation of women in this sphere as well as for greater participation of women in all areas of society. The High Commissioner voiced her concern about the decrease of women in top mission leadership positions, and expressed her commitment to ensure a minimum of 15% of funding is spent on post conflict peace-building projects on gender equality.

France and Sweden, which spoke on behalf of the Nordic Countries, as well as Croatia, Chile, Lithuania and Namibia made a reference to the ATT or drew a link between the sale of SALW and GBV.

OTHER

It was encouraging to see Sweden and Slovenia pay tribute to Secretary- General's call for expanded access to sexual and reproductive health services, while Ms. Balipou spoke about providing survivors with ‘comprehensive multisectoral responses, with necessary funding'. Nigeria, Chile and the EU mentioned the need to improve gender analysis and collect sex-disaggregated data, which was an equally positive sign of progress. Most speakers also requested more regular WPS briefings to the Council, and there was a general consensus of support for the global study. Finally, the frequency of references made in favor of collaborating with women's civil society groups constituted another progressive trend, as did the calls for capacity building made by many countries including Japan, Guatemala, Portugal, Latvia and the Czech Republic.

See the attachments for the resolution 2122 text, the 2013 Secretary General's Report, Azerbaijan's concept note, and the press release provided by the NGO Working Group on Women Peace and Security. Our analysis of the 2013 SG Report can be viewed here.

The UN press release can be accessed here.

Click here to access the Meeting Records.

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General Women, Peace and Security
  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    "As the Secretary General's report acknowledges, there remain troubling gaps in what we know about women and security, but one thing we've learned is that there is a correlation between gender inequity and the potential for civil strife. Consider, for example, the Central African Republic, which ranks 138th out of 146 on the UNDP's gender inequality index. Even before the recent explosion in violence, teen pregnancy was out of control and the rate of unhealthy births and maternal deaths was far too high. The situation is now a catastrophe as rebels have replaced law with anarchy and as we've heard a quarter million people have been driven from their homes. The depth of this crisis underlines the importance of Ms. Balipou's presence here today; it is vital that her message of inclusion be heeded."

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    "My colleagues, the Secretary General's report reminds us that the implementation of Resolution 1325 must go forward with both the short and long term in mind. Our ultimate goal is a transformation in how people everywhere think about security; our daily focus is on the incremental changes that will lead us in the right direction."

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    My delegation thanks Azerbaijan, as President for the month of October, for convening an open debate on women, peace and security. Lithuania welcomes the adoption of resolution 2122 (2013) today, which aims to streamline action within the United Nations system to implement resolution 1325 (2000) and other related decisions. It is important that the resolution clearly underlines the role of regional organizations and civil society. We appreciate the recommendations of the Secretary- General that provide a strategic look at and guidance on the implementation of existing commitments. We would also like to commend the work of Ms. Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director of UN Women. and her first briefing to the Council.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts


    In conclusion, let me reaffirm India's commitment to contributing positively to the consolidation of United Nations efforts in the area of women, peace and security.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, let me reaffirm India's commitment to contributing positively to the consolidation of United Nations efforts in the area of women, peace and security.

  • Speaker

    NATO
  • Extracts

    In the year that has passed since I last addressed the Security Council (see S/PV.6877), work by NATO and our partners on the issue of women, peace and security has continued to progress. Awareness is growing, and it is better understood that mainstreaming gender in the broader security context will strengthen our ability to meet today's security challenges. Furthermore, our policies on women and peace and security are becoming a more integral part of our everyday business.

  • Speaker

    NATO
  • Extracts

    A review of the practical implications of resolution 1325 (2000) in the conduct of NATO-led operations and missions has been concluded together with our partners in the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) and the International Security Force in Kosovo, and recommendations on the way ahead have been approved by the North Atlantic Council. That review and the ensuing discussions in the Alliance with our partners provided a good opportunity for us to learn from our experiences in Afghanistan and Kosovo.

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    I want to thank the Secretary- General and everyone who, based on their experience and commitment, has contributed to the need to make progress in realizing the full equality for women.

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    In that connection, I should like to recall what Patrick Cammaert, former Deputy Force Commander of the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, said in 2008: it is more dangerous to be a woman than a soldier in a modern conflict.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    I have the honour to speak on behalf of the Pacific Islands Forum States represented at the United Nations: Australia, the Federated States of Micronesia, Kiribati, Nauru, New Zealand, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu and my small atoll nation, the Republic of the Marshall Islands. The Pacific Islands Forum members stand on the leading edge of evolving security issues — situations in which women play a critical role to play in working towards stability. At the same time, despite some very positive overall gains, progress in the region towards gender equality is slow, with only mixed results since the Forum issued the Pacific Leaders Gender Equality Declaration last year.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, the countries of the Pacific Islands Forum are committed to work with like-minded countries to ensure that our necessary local efforts and our contributions to the United Nations will always encourage and support resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Egypt
  • Extracts

    The Council's semi-annual open debate to review the implementation of Council resolution 1325 (2000)m, on women and peace and security, is a good opportunity to review the progress made over the past year, share good practices and identify the persistent barriers to the full implementation of the resolution.

  • Country

    Egypt
  • Extracts

    Thirdly, we support the inclusion of the theme of women and peace and security as a crosscutting issue in the post-2015 development agenda.

  • Country

    Egypt
  • Extracts

    Fourthly, the Security Council will hold a high- level meeting in 2015 to mark the fifteenth anniversary of the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000). It will assess progress in implementing that resolution, renew commitments and address obstacles and constraints. In that regard, there is a need to address the existing gap related to quality data collection and analysis in conflict settings. Egypt supports conducting a global study to highlight good practices, implementation gaps and challenges, as well as emerging trends and priorities for action. The outcome of that study should be available to all Member States.

  • Country

    Egypt
  • Extracts

    Egypt reiterates its commitment to the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), in line with its international obligations, as well as its conviction of the critical and indispensable role that could be played by women in resolving armed conflicts and in post- conflict situations.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    In that regard, any assistance from the United Nations, including that undertaken through the Peacebuilding Commission, must be carried out in a concerted manner and include a gender perspective. In addition, it must also be in accordance with the principle of national ownership, taking into account the unique and specific needs and situations present in each country.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    I will give a somewhat shortened version of the distributed statement. We thank the delegation of Azerbaijan for organizing today's very important debate and we welcome the Security Council's unanimous adoption of resolution 2122 (2013). New Zealand also associates itself with the statement to be delivered shortly by the representative of the Marshall Islands who will speak on behalf of Pacific Islands Forum.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    Women and peace and security is the agenda item that will not go away, and with very good reason. As long as that remains the reality, New Zealand will continue to participate actively in the implementation of the women and peace and security agenda.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    Mr. President, allow me to begin by thanking you for organizing today's open debate of the Security Council and the speakers for their valuable contributions.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    In concluding, I would like to thank you, Mr. President, all for your efforts in advancing the women and peace and security agenda and express the hope that we will see significant progress in that area in the lead-up to the 2015 review.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, I wish to underscore that we support the Council's adoption today of resolution 2122 (2013), which we were pleased to sponsor.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    All this has taken place with arming, support and financing from Qatar, Saudi Arabia and France. Those States have spent countless sums on influential media and invidious sectarian incitement to halt Syria's socioeconomic, security and judicial development. They work to undermine its independence, its national decision-making and its rejection of those who exploit religion. Most prominent among the fatwas that affect women is the fatwa of sex as struggle, which allows fornication under the guise of jihad. Published by some irresponsible minds and financed by the Gulf regimes, the fatwa encourages Islamic women to commit adultery in the name of religion. My delegation has sent a detailed letter on that diseased fatwa and the mentalities that promote it to the Secretary-General (A/68/487, annex). We urge all those present and those who are concerned for human rights to study it.

  • Country

    Guatemala
  • Extracts

    I now turn to my statement. I wish to thank you, Sir, for convening this open debate. Anecdotally, it brings back memories of my presidency of the Council exactly one year ago, when a presidential statement was adopted (S/PRST/2012/23) even before the debate was held, for it was postponed until November due to Hurricane Sandy, which caused so much damage to the city that it prevented the scheduled meeting. That is why we welcome the convening of the debate and the adoption of the new resolution, which strengthens the conceptual framework of the Council's groundbreaking resolution 1325 (2000) on the issue, as well as several subsequent resolutions and presidential statements.

  • Country

    Guatemala
  • Extracts

    Each year the Council has continued to build upon the core premise of resolution 1325 (2000), because we are convinced that without women's security, there can be no lasting peace. We think that the timely theme of today's debate, on women, rule of law and transitional justice in conflict-affected situations, will generate added value.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    As the representative of the world's largest regional security organization I would like at the outset to devote a few remarks to the role regional organizations can and should play with respect to the implementation of the commitments resulting from the Women, Peace and Security agenda.

  • Country

    Pakistan
  • Extracts

    "We hope that some of the practical recommendations contained in the resolution adopted today will infuse new momentum and vigour into our collective efforts to promote the women and peace and security agenda."

  • Country

    Belarus
  • Extracts

    Our shared responsibility, affirmed as a moral imperative of policy, is to steadfastly abide by partnerships based on respect, even if that goes against our short-term interests and plans. Only that approach can guarantee a genuine implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) on women and peace and security, resolution 2106 (2013), and resolution 2122 (2013), adopted today.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    At its core, the women and peace and security agenda presents an ambitious, even a radical, challenge. It calls on us to fundamentally revise the role of women within society. It requires men to reflect on their own roles and abandon traditional mindsets.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    It is clear that real transformative progress will be possible only when national political leaders in conflict- affected societies, almost all of the them men at present, adopt the women and peace and security agenda as their own, and when more male voices are heard and more male champions stand up. We need to expand understanding of the enormous contribution that women can make in meeting peace and security challenges. We need to incentivize national and local male leaders so that they commit to making the concrete progress needed to realize that potential.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    In order for Member States and the United Nations system to be able to take effective actions, it is important that we highlight good practices and share lessons learned. Today's open debate is an excellent opportunity to that end.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, Japan will continue to make every possible efforts to contribute to the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) as we approach the fifteenth anniversary of its adoption, and will actively participate in its high-level review in 2015.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    At the outset, I wish to congratulate Azerbaijan on assuming the presidency of the Security Council for this month. I also express my thanks for convening today's open debate on the important issue of women, peace and security.

  • Country

    Solomon Is.
  • Extracts

    At one of the open debates in the Council during the previous session, we discussed cooperation between the United Nations and regional and subregional organizations (see S/PV.7015). Looking at the experience of the Solomon Islands relating to women and peace and security, we cannot help making the connection to the contribution of regional organizations to the maintenance of international peace and security, given its role in our national situation. At the request of the Government of the Solomon Islands, under the auspices of the Pacific Islands Forum in 2003, a Regional Assistance Mission to the Solomon Islands, led by Australia and supported by New Zealand and all the Pacific small island developing States, was deployed to my country to restore the rule of law, rebuild core public institutions and allow the country to recover from the conflict. The Regional Assistance Mission, made up of military, police and civilian components, restored the rule of law and carried out peacekeeping, peacebuilding and peacemaking activities.

  • Country

    Solomon Is.
  • Extracts

    I would like to conclude by assuring you once again, Mr. President, of the support and cooperation of the Solomon Islands in protecting women's safety and their contribution to nation-building and world peace.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    Canada looks forward to working with others to strengthen our collective efforts to empower women and girls as active decision-makers. We look forward to the Security Council high-level review in 2015 to assess what progress we are making in enhancing the role of women in international peace and security.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    As in other areas, we have noted a lack of consistency when it comes to the inclusion of concerns raised by the issue of women and peace and security in the Security Council's work. It is important that the Council consistently implement the provisions of resolution 1325 (2000) and the follow-up resolutions in all its resolutions on country situations.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    My delegation commends the adoption today of resolution 2122 (2013), which continues building the institutional framework begun in 2000 with the historic resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    For my country, persistence continues to be the linchpin for decision-making and implementing action on the agenda for women and peace and security.

  • Country

    Slovenia
  • Extracts

    We also join others in welcoming the adoption of resolution 2122 (2013).

  • Country

    Slovenia
  • Extracts

    We also consider it important that the topic under discussion today be addressed by regional organizations as well, as important stakeholders in the task of ensuring peace and security.

  • Country

    Syria
  • Extracts

    The permanent representative of France spoke about my country in a manner that lacks the diplomatic finesse expected from the representative of a permanent member of the Council. It would seem that the French regime — through its extremism and its continued disregard for its responsibilities as a permanent member of the Council, along with its bloody interference in the affairs of several member States, including my country — has lost the legitimacy to maintain its status in the Council. By encouraging, arming and protecting regimes that refuse to attend the Geneva conference and that continue to kill Syrians from Paris and elsewhere, the French regime, through its irresponsible and childish interference, has become a threat to international peace and security and is no longer a member to be trusted with maintaining international peace and security.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    To conclude, we have the tools to ensure that the vision enshrined in resolution 1325 (2000) becomes reality. It is high time we use them to turn a new page in the lives of many women and girls around the world.

Conflict Prevention
  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    Security Council resolution 1325 was a landmark measure. It affirmed the principle that women's participation in conflict prevention, mitigation, and recovery is vital to the maintenance of international security and peace. Not a sideshow, but vital.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    For the Council to remain responsive, it is critical that timely and relevant information and analysis is provided systematically by all UN actors deployed on conflict resolution and peacebuilding efforts. We commend today's resolution for clearly articulating this. As we know, it has long been recognised that women's engagement in conflict prevention and resolution, and peacebuilding efforts is more likely to lead to sustainable peace and security.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    Chile will continue promoting the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), convinced as it is of the important role played by women in the prevention and resolution of conflicts and of the need to increase their participation in decision-making processes.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    Such improvements have had normative consequences. The adoption of the Arms Trade Treaty revealed the link between the spread of small arms and light weapons and sexual violence. We have given strong support to this part of the Treaty, which France will soon ratify.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    In many violent situations in the Pacific region, women have demonstrated their capacity to contribute to solutions as mediators, providers of safe havens, or in working to improve local communities. Women and young women have also played an important part in conflict prevention, management and recovery in the region. Women have generally been first to actively work across ethnic divides, despite considerable risks.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    The Pacific region is working to achieve better participation in formal conflict prevention and management and post-conflict recovery efforts, as well as oversight and accountability mechanisms for the security sector. The region recognizes the value of having women at the negotiating table in leadership roles and the need to provide sufficient recognition and resources to ensure that they are able to do their work.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    The action plan provides a detailed regional framework to enhance women's and young women's leadership in conflict prevention and peacebuilding, mainstream gender and ensure the protection of women's and girls' human rights in humanitarian crises and in transitioning from conflict, disaster or post-conflict situations — all with a mechanism to accelerate the implementation of existing international, regional and national commitments on women, peace and security.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    We also believe that without women's civil society strength and women's leadership, there will be no effective prevention. Women's experiences of violence during and after conflict are much broader, and effective protection from all forms of violence and violations will be possible only through their empowerment and participation.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    It is widely acknowledged that in situations of conflict, the most vulnerable, women included, are those who suffer the most. That makes prevention especially important. The tendency to rush to military solutions runs contrary to the idea of the protection of civilians, since the use of force aggravates the risks to the most vulnerable and further penalizes civilians, in particular women and children.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    Brazil believes that supporting and promoting women's participation in the maintenance of international peace and security is an increasingly important aspect of the Security Council's responsibility under the Charter. In that vein, we encourage further reflection and debates on the role of women in promoting the prevention and peaceful settlement of disputes.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    Important structural gender asymmetries curb the options of women in most societies. Rural women, in particular, have their potential as agents of peace hindered, since they benefit less than men from the wealth created by rural employment and face new challenges owing to the impact of the still ongoing economic crisis. Yet, rural women are key contributors to global economies, playing a critical role in both developed and developing nations. They enhance agricultural and rural development, improve food security and help reduce poverty levels in their communities, thereby contributing to the promotion of sustainable development with social inclusion and food security, which are key to attaining sustainable peace.

  • Country

    Egypt
  • Extracts

    Egypt has considered with interest the Secretary- General's report on women and peace and security (S/2013/525). We would like to express our appreciation for the efforts made in the drafting of the report, which highlights the progress made, including the significant policy and operational focus on the monitoring, prevention and prosecution of violence against women in conflicts. In that context, I would like to make the following remarks.

  • Country

    Egypt
  • Extracts

    First, Egypt reaffirms the pivotal role of women in the prevention and resolution of conflicts and in peacebuilding, as outlined in the resolution 1325 (2000). We also stress the importance of promoting the education and economic empowerment of women as effective tools to achieving sustainable peace and security.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    The European Union supports the work aimed at increasing the role of women in the prevention and resolution of conflicts and in peacebuilding, promoting women's equal participation in all efforts for the promotion of peace and security and providing an integrated approach to prevent and punish acts of sexual violence, as well as to bring justice, services and reparation to its victims.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    The resolution 2122 (2013), adopted this morning, is another clear ref lection of the strong resolve of the Council concerning the critical role of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, peacebuilding and peacekeeping. We are particularly appreciative of the fact that the resolution provides a good reference on supporting the development and strengthening of the capacities of national institutions in order to provide sustainable assistance to women and girls affected by armed conflict and post-conflict situations.

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    Women will not be protected in any lasting way until in-depth legal and judicial reforms are undertaken by countries emerging from armed conflict. Fortunately, a number of countries have undertaken reforms in accordance with the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and other relevant international legal instruments. Clearly, the best way to protect women and fight effectively against the effects of armed conflict on the lives of people in conflict is to take measures to prevent the outbreak of conflicts.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    With regard to the most recent report of the Secretary- General (S/2013/525), we note with satisfaction that the attention from the international community to the issue of sexual violence in conflict has increased. We therefore call upon all stakeholders to continue their efforts to reduce and eliminate the high incidence of threats faced by women and girls in contemporary armed conflicts. However, we realize that despite the urgency with which practices in implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) have improved, there remains a deficit in opportunities for women on both the national and international levels. To exercise leadership, there remains an ongoing underrepresentation of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, protection and peacebuilding processes and efforts.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Conflicts create situations in which women and children are the ones most affected by the deterioration of living conditions and fundamental rights. Violence and the deprivation of rights often go hand in hand with conflict. Efforts to fight impunity, provide assistance to victims and hold perpetrators accountable must be intensified and better coordinated. Regrettably, sexual and gender-based violence often continue after peace deals are reached, due to insufficient investment in protection and prevention strategies, or weak security and justice institutions. We are aware of the fact that peace cannot be sustained unless women play a critical role in the process. We therefore underscore the importance of the full and effective involvement of women at all stages of peace processes and of giving them an equal role in the prevention and resolution of conflicts, as well as in early peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    Additionally, as stated in the Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525), women's representation in the justice sector plays a significant role in increasing the reporting of crimes and enhancing public trust in the rule of law institutions. The importance of prevention must likewise be stressed. By enabling women to fully participate in judicial systems, we can better tackle the root causes of impunity for violence against women.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    We therefore welcome the fact that resolution 2122 (2013), adopted earlier today, emphasizes the positive role that women can and will play if they are fully included in all aspects of conflict-prevention and peacebuilding. The potential of women in building a sustainable peace cannot be underestimated, nor can the imminent problems for post-conflict societies if those who bear the burden of reconstruction on the ground are not fully included in decision-making.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Secondly, 43 countries have adopted national action plans on women, peace and security. That is an important first step. However, any progress on the ground depends on the political will to abide by those commitments. The German national action plan, which was adopted last year, covers the four focus areas set out in resolution 1325 (2000) and additionally includes the areas of preparation for peace missions and the prosecution of crimes. The implementation of the action plan is monitored by an inter-ministerial working group in collaboration with representatives from civil society. German diplomatic missions abroad have been instructed to support the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), for example by advocating for the inclusion of women in local crisis prevention, conflict management and post-conflict peacebuilding or by supporting gender-sensitive projects on the ground.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    Prevention, rather than reaction, must be a priority. That requires the existence of early warning mechanisms based on accurate, objective and reliable information. The collection of data relating to sexual violence in areas of conflict is crucial and strongly encouraged, so that both national and international actors may be duly informed.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    The rule of law should address justice, equality and equity with a strong focus on the empowerment of women and girls, gender equality, and preventing and combating violence against women as essential preconditions for equitable and inclusive sustainable development. In that context, we praise the work of the United Nations in assisting Member States to address rule of law issues in conflict contexts and we consider it vital that the United Nations continues to emphasize the importance of providing redress and assistance to victims in conflict, post-conflict and other crisis situations.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    The prevention of and response to violence against children, in particular, including sexual violence and abuse, forced marriage and maltreatment, should continue to be an important focus area of United Nations assistance.

  • Country

    Guatemala
  • Extracts

    "The resolution that we adopted today contributes to reducing the vulnerability of women and girls in armed conflict and post-conflict situations. We recognize the need to receive timely information in order to intervene early and save lives. In that sense, preventing conflicts is the best way to protect all civilians from the horrors that accompany armed conflicts, in particular women and girls."

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    Effective and optimal empowerment of women in the context of peacebuilding and post-conflict reconstruction involves the collective and coordinated action of the international community and the United Nations system, through strengthening protection and prevention measures adapted to specific contexts that will facilitate the implementation of the resolution.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    While it is obvious that States have the primary responsibility for ensuring that the Resolutions on Women, Peace and Security are translated into action, regional organizations working on the maintenance of international peace and security such as the OSCE, also have a recognized role. Both the recent Presidential Statement on cooperation with regional organizations, passed in August of this year by the Council, and several of the Women, Peace and Security resolutions refer to the crucial contribution of regional organizations in affirming the participation of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution mechanisms and peace-building.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    The OSCE participating States have acknowledged the importance of the Women, Peace and Security agenda by passing a number of Ministerial Council Decisions, among others one explicitly dedicated to increasing Women's Participation in Conflict Prevention, Crisis Management and Post-Conflict Rehabilitation and another dealing with the Elements of the Conflict Cycle to include 1325 commitments. As a result, the OSCE has taken a number of initiatives both at the Secretariat level as well as at the level of its Field Operations to implement these MC Decisions, particularly in conflict affected contexts in the OSCE region.

  • Country

    Pakistan
  • Extracts

    "The rule of law is one of the key elements in the promotion of the agenda on women and peace and security. Gender-responsive transitional justice and reform of the justice and security sectors are prerequisites for promoting and protecting women's rights in conflict and post-conflict situations. The rule of law and transitional justice should continue to be developed so as to protect the rights of women in such situations. The emphasis should be on addressing the root causes of conflicts. Chronic conflicts and relapses into conflict blight some societies, countries and regions and keep them in a state of perpetual instability. The resolution of conflicts is, therefore, the best way to promote and protect the rights and interests of women in conflict situations. We must harness all our resources to prevent and resolve conflicts."

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    It is just as important to include such issues in the mandates of relevant missions. We urge States to tackle those issues not in a predetermined way, but by being mindful of individual situations. Such a differentiated approach must also be applied when giving the United Nations system instructions on how to integrate gender issues into their mandates. They have clear mandates, and for the majority of them, issues of women, peace and security are not an absolute priority but merely one of a number of factors within the framework of action aimed at preventing and resolving armed conflict and post-conflict situations. Let us not forget that the leading role in protecting women at all stages of armed conflict lies with national Governments, while measures taken by bodies of the United Nations system and by civil society must be aimed at backing and complimenting efforts made by States.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Secondly, the Security Council should play its unique role fully, while strengthening its coordination and cooperation with related organizations and agencies. As the primary institution for maintaining international peace and security, the Council should focus on conflict prevention, dispute mediation and post-conflict reconstruction so as to foster an enabling political, security and rule-of-law environment for safeguarding women's security, rights and interests. The General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council, the Human Rights Council, UN Women and other United Nations agencies should discharge their respective responsibilities while working closely with one another with a view to generating synergies.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    Malaysia welcomes today's adoption of the resolution 2122 (2013) on the issue discussed. My delegation hopes that there will be sufficient impetus toward the actual realization of the resolution and the landmark resolution 1325 (2000). Malaysia therefore appreciates the ongoing update on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in the Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525) of 4 September. As mentioned in the report, there remains a deficit in opportunities for women to exercise leadership, and women are still underrepresented in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, protection and peacebuilding processes. My delegation believes that the greater active participation of women in peacekeeping and peacebuilding would go a long way towards including a gender perspective and allowing women to shape peace.

  • Country

    Solomon Is.
  • Extracts

    We have come a long way, but we are determined to keep going, focusing on the economic empowerment of women and greater investment in rural areas, which is where the bulk of populations are located in least developed countries (LDCs) as well as in Pacific nations. These are conflict-resolution measures as well as conflict-prevention measures. It is for that reason that putting peace at the heart of sustainable development, with peace — and state—building goals, is something that we, as a member of the Group of 77 and China, would like to see on the post-2015 development agenda. We would like to see more investment in high- value, game-changing investments that can transform economies within the Pacific and in LDCs to allow us to build resilience against warm, cold and hot security threats.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    Particularly egregious is the practice of child, early and forced marriage, which puts the very lives of young girls at risk. That practice denies girls' rights, disrupts their access to education, severely jeopardizes their health and limits the development of their community as a whole. Conflict situations exacerbate that practice among displaced and refugee populations, such as we know to be the case in Syria. Canada encourages the Security Council to continue to provide political leadership and to take action to ensure the meaningful participation of women in conflict prevention, mediation and resolution processes.

  • Country

    Qatar
  • Extracts

    We also recognize the positive contribution of the Security Council to the rule of law, which is one of the key aspects of conflict prevention, peacekeeping, conflict resolution and peacebuilding. We fully agree with the prevailing position that justice, including transitional justice, is a fundamental building block of sustainable peace in countries in conflict or post- conflict situations. Delivering justice and security in respect of the rule of law mitigates conflict, helps reduce the risk of relapse into further conflict and creates conditions conducive to sustainable development.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    On that count I would like to highlight the initiatives mentioned by the Secretary-General in his report that have promoted the involvement of women in crisis and conflict situations. I would like to highlight specific areas where Spain has participated. They are the High-level Conference on Women's Leadership in the Sahel Region, held in Brussels in April; the work of UN Women through counselling many countries on incorporating women's rights and gender equality in measures being taken to restore peace and guarantee justice in the context of a transition; and the general recommendation that the Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women has adopted today on women and conflict-prevention, conflicts and post-conflict.

Disarmament
  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    "From resolution 1208 (1998), on security for refugees, which underscores the special security needs of women in camps, to resolution 1314 (2000), which underscores the importance of prevention, disarmament, demobilization and reintegration policies including a gender perspective, it is clear we have made progress. However, it was particularly through resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions focused on the situation of women in conflict and post-conflict situations that the Council underscored, as priorities in achieving lasting peace, the promotion and protection of women's human rights and their equal participation in transitional justice and reconciliation processes, as well as a human rights perspective and a gender perspective in all the efforts and programmes for development, peace, security and the building and strengthening of the rule of law."

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    Chile signed the Arms Trade Treaty and urges other States to support that initiative, which we believe represents an important humanitarian instrument for the prevention of violence against women and girls.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    Such improvements have had normative consequences. The adoption of the Arms Trade Treaty revealed the link between the spread of small arms and light weapons and sexual violence. We have given strong support to this part of the Treaty, which France will soon ratify.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    As stated on many occasions, Spain devotes particular efforts to promoting a gender perspective in conflict situations and has had a plan of action on women, peace and security since 2007. Within that framework, our country carries out various actions within the scope of its foreign policy, cooperation and defence activities in order to guarantee the correct implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). In particular, I would like to refer to the International Seminar on Gender Perspective and Peace Operations, coordinated by the Ministries of Foreign Affairs and Defence of Spain and the Netherlands. The sixth edition of that seminar will take place next November in The Hague. The seminar includes a specific module on the role of women in the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration processes, as well as on the processes regarding security sector reform. Spanish cooperation plays a leading role in that regard through the plan on gender-sensitive peacebuilding, with a chapter dedicated to gender-sensitive transitional justice and the rule of law. Furthermore, the Office for Humanitarian Action of the Spanish Agency for International Aid for Development has elaborated a guide to address sexual violence in humanitarian interventions.

Participation
  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    And of course Madame Balipou, not only for her remarks and for undertaking an arduous journey to be with us here today, but for advocating with such eloquence on behalf of women's participation, and on behalf of the rule of law, which go very much together, in the Central African Republic and beyond, what you do takes courage, and we commend you for it.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    Security Council resolution 1325 was a landmark measure. It affirmed the principle that women's participation in conflict prevention, mitigation, and recovery is vital to the maintenance of international security and peace. Not a sideshow, but vital.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    In the wake of such suffering, we understand that inadequate governance and limited resources may complicate the task of recovery and healing. There is, however, one standard we can live up to regardless of the situation -- and that is the principle of inclusion; whether a country is rich or poor, there is no excuse for denying women fair representation when negotiating the terms of the peace, when enacting laws or in forging a conflict free future. And here, the United Nations should be a standard setter and, according to the Secretary General's September report, some important progress is being made.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    This past year, as we've heard, women were included in every formal peace negotiating process led or co- led by the UN. Gender experts were present in eighty-five percent of delegations and, in each case, representatives of women's civil society groups were consulted. Women are playing a more prominent role in crisis prevention, most notably in Darfur and the Great Lakes Region. Since 2009, gender crimes investigators have been a part of all UN commissions of inquiry. And again as was said, this year 3 out of 10 peace agreements in UN supported processes included provisions for women's political participation or protection. That is more than the year before. Analysis of women and security is now included in most reports by peacekeeping and special political missions. And the Secretary General has established – and my government and other governments vigorously support – the policy of zero tolerance toward sexual- related abuses committed by UN personnel, something that still happens with alarming incidence.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    Less impressive, however, is the level of women's participation in police and military deployments. The figures of ten percent and three percent respectively remain well below the modest target of twenty percent that had been set for next year. Just as disappointing, only four of the twenty seven peace-related field missions are led by women.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    This plan is backed by leaders across the U.S. government. President Obama is personally determined to change the DNA of the U.S. government so that this inexorable link between women's inclusion and lasting peace is a premise or an axiom brought to every policy discussion. President Obama and Secretary of State Kerry have ordered its full integration into our diplomacy; the Defense Department is spreading the message of gender awareness to partners across the globe; our Justice Department is working with police, prosecutors, and judges to increase accountability for sexual violence; and the Centers for Disease Control have launched a system for monitoring abuse against women and girls.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    "Because of UN Women and its partners, numerous productive initiatives are underway. These range from peace building efforts by women in Mali to new legal protection measures in Colombia to smoother access to justice in Haiti to the enhanced role for women in the police of Zimbabwe. Women are also playing an important part in preparing for elections in Sierra Leone and in harnessing new communications technology to monitor and report on violations in Sudan and other areas of conflict."

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    "We've seen in Kenya civil society deeply engaged in a five year campaign – endorsed by the UN – to enshrine the rights of women to own land, live equally in marriage, and be free from the threat of violence. And on Election Day this past spring, a record eighty-seven women were chosen for parliament, a number that – pursuant to the country's new constitution – will increase further in the years ahead."

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    "And we commend Rwanda which now has 62% of its parliamentarians are women, a remarkable statistic."

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    "We know, as well, that what begins as a single voice can sometimes become a mighty chorus. And like many of you, I recently had the honor of meeting Malala Yousafzai, the young Pakistani with the soft smile and the steel spine as well as the powerful message of inclusion. Whether discussing the right of a girl to sit in a classroom or the right of a woman to lead her country in the quest for security and peace, the principle is the same and the dividend for peace, for dignity, and for prosperity of women's inclusion, that dividend is obvious."

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    "Make no mistake, the engagement of women in peace and security does not reflect a desire for disengagement by men. The principle that guides us is respect for the rights and dignity of all. And to end and recover from strife, we seek the leadership and participation of each gender and every nationality. Just as all benefit from peace, so all must help to create peace."

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Lithuania associates itself with the statement made by the representative of the European Union. I will limit myself to a few points relating to the agenda on the rule of law and the participation of women.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    We must pay greater attention to providing better support for victims, including by ensuring protection for witnesses, victims and justice officials, providing reparation mechanisms and ensuring the systematic inclusion of women in all aspects of conflict resolution. United Nations special representatives, peacekeeping and political missions and United Nations agencies have a much greater role to play.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    In previous statements my delegation has already spoken about the importance of ensuring the empowerment of women. Their participation at all levels of economic, political and social life is as crucial to sustainable peace as it is to poverty reduction, economic recovery and sustainable development. We welcome the the Peacebuilding Commission's declaration on women's economic empowerment for peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    The recent decrease in women's share of senior positions in United Nations field operations should be reversed. Efforts by the United Nations to retain, attract and support women staff should be complemented by efforts by Member States to consistently nominate more female candidates.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Notably greater involvement of women — from mediation, restoring the rule of law and governance to participation in post-conflict electoral processes — continues to require commitment and attention. It also requires greater dedicated resourcing, particularly for civil society groups working on the ground.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The resolution of armed conflict situations requires a holistic and sustainable approach. The participation of women in peace processes and post- conflict reconstruction efforts is necessary to lay the foundation for lasting peace. In that regard, resolution 1325 (2000) and successive Council resolutions on this issue have provided a framework for effective institutional arrangements. As the Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525) points out, significant progress has been made but much more needs to be done.

  • Speaker

    NATO
  • Extracts

    In NATO's collaborations with partner nations on women and peace and security we focus on joint political leadership, as well as on practical cooperation in the security and defence fields. Reforms and the rebuilding of security institutions should be gender- sensitive and ensure women's participation in security, as in any other sector of our societies. I am happy to report that over the past year a number of partners have included or are considering including women and peace and security-related goals in their cooperation programmes with NATO.

  • Speaker

    NATO
  • Extracts

    NATO fully recognizes the need to ensure access to justice for all, and we recognize the challenges that occur when the rule of law breaks down in a conflict situation and when there is no equality before the law. We do not have individual liberty if women cannot decide for themselves; we do not have democracy if women cannot participate; we do not respect human rights if women's rights are not respected; and there is no rule of law if women do not have access to justice.

  • Speaker

    NATO
  • Extracts

    We should, however, not regard women as passive victims and recipients. Just as women need to be included in the prevention, management and resolution of conflicts, women need to be included also in reconciliation and transitional justice. Women's participation is a matter of basic human rights and democratic principles. Those most affected by conflicts must be heard and enabled to contribute to the solutions that prevent conflicts. We cannot afford not to include women. It is not simply a question of what benefits women, but of what benefits the whole society — men and women, boys and girls.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    We welcome the Security Council's adoption of resolution 2122 (2013), especially as it seeks to place women at the table for negotiations and peace talks. Women generally represent a majority constituency in societies, and as such should not be excluded from the negotiation table in conflict-affected States. South Africa is supportive of such an approach, especially as our own history has taught us about the powerful role that women play in bringing about peace and stability. We also believe that women should play a role beyond that, one that includes securing a larger stake in political leadership and policy- and decision-making positions, both in the public and private sectors.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    The report of the Secretary-General correctly points out the need for increased participation by women in United Nations peacekeeping missions. South Africa has played its role in that regard by contributing through its police deployment, a contingent made up of 16 per cent women, which, according to the Secretary- General's report, is the highest percentage of female deployment by a troop-contributing country.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Our history has not only demonstrated, but has taught us, about the powerful role that women play in a post-conflict setting. South African women represent a powerful constituency and have been at the forefront of driving reform and developing and advancing responsive policies and legislation across all sectors of Government and the public and private sectors. At the level of women's participation in political decision-making, today South Africa has 44 per cent women representation in Parliament and 43 per cent women at the level of Cabinet ministers. At the provincial level, five of the nine provincial premiers are women.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    My delegation appreciates the commendable work undertaken by the Team of Experts on the Rule of Law and Sexual Violence in Conflict. However, we remain of the view that significantly more needs to be done by Member States, the United Nations system and the relevant entities in supporting national efforts by States to increase women's participation, leadership and expertise in the rule of law and transitional justice, as well as in advancing accountability measures for serious offences committed against women and children.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    The elimination of the root causes of conflict is the best way to prevent sexual violence and to address impunity. Combating impunity is possible only by building transparent, effective, non-discriminatory and functioning institutions and justice systems. It is vital to ensure that women and girls have access to judicial institutions and proper representation. We in the international community should pursue our efforts to support gender-sensitive judicial reform and capacity- building. It is important to provide gender expertise in peacekeeping operations and peacebuilding efforts, as well as to ensure the participation of women in those efforts.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    A significant number of peace agreements fail within the first five years of signature. Among the various reasons for this outcome, the lack of inclusiveness is evident. The full, equal and meaningful participation of women at the decision-making level is crucial for assuring that the political, social and economic outcomes of peace talks and mediation efforts address their specific issues and concerns.

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    Argentina would like to emhasize the need for a gender perspective and for crimes against women to be incorporated into the agenda of peace negotiations. To that end, we need women in decision-making positions and at all stages of the peace process. We know that women are victims of widespread violence at the hands of all parties involved in a conflict. We also know that sexual violence in conflict is not a new phenomenon, rather it is a powerful weapon used to destroy not merely the life of a woman but also to destroy families, communities, ethnic groups or entire nations.

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    "From resolution 1208 (1998), on security for refugees, which underscores the special security needs of women in camps, to resolution 1314 (2000), which underscores the importance of prevention, disarmament, demobilization and reintegration policies including a gender perspective, it is clear we have made progress. However, it was particularly through resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions focused on the situation of women in conflict and post-conflict situations that the Council underscored, as priorities in achieving lasting peace, the promotion and protection of women's human rights and their equal participation in transitional justice and reconciliation processes, as well as a human rights perspective and a gender perspective in all the efforts and programmes for development, peace, security and the building and strengthening of the rule of law."

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    "However, we still have much to do to achieve women's effective equality as people with rights and to achieve equal representation in decision-making arenas, and for those reasons, we welcome the resolution adopted today (resolution 2122 (2013))."

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    Mr President, Australia welcomes Azerbaijan bringing the Council's focus to the critical intersection between the rule of law and transitional justice, and the women, peace and security agenda. I thank the Secretary- General, and the High Commissioner for Human Rights, Ms Pillay for their determined efforts. And Ms Brigitte Balipou for inspiring struggle on the frontlines. And I welcome Madame Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, as the new Executive Director of UN Women – we look forward to receiving regular briefings from her and other senior UN officials on the gender dimensions of conflict and across the thematic work on our agenda. It is integral to our work that you regularly provide such input. Thirteen years ago, Security Council resolution 1325 recognised the central role of women to the maintenance of international peace and security. But as the Secretary-General's report makes clear, while there has been some progress, typically the linkages between women's participation and the work of the Council are not made. The consistent inclusion in mission mandates of women, peace and security objectives, is fundamental to addressing this.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    For countries emerging from conflict, peace processes often lead to institutional reforms that establish new political, economic and social orders. Women's early participation in peace talks is critical, not only to their effectiveness, but to underpinning women's longer-term empowerment. Formal peace processes must reflect the reality that women are already undertaking peace work in their communities, and serving as agents of change as part of efforts to keep the fabric of conflict-affected societies together.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    Engaging women as leaders is critical to building sustainable peace. We must identify and address impediments that prevent women from participating in decision-making. We commend Mary Robinson's appointment as Special Envoy to the Great Lakes Region, and her long overdue approach to consulting early with women in the Democratic Republic of Congo. We support the UN's ongoing dialogue with women's civil society organisations as a barometer of progress and a critical source of knowledge on the effectiveness of missions.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    In post-conflict settings, women's full and effective participation is fundamental to efforts to rebuild the justice sector and to security sector reform. In Solomon Islands for example, Australia supported, through the Participating Police Force, the post-conflict recruitment and retention of female officers to the local police force. The early involvement of women, and the integration of a gender-perspective, led directly to the establishmen to critical domestic violence and sexual abuse services. More fundamentally, it also underwrote the broader processes of community rebuilding.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    In post-conflict settings, women's full and effective participation is fundamental to efforts to rebuild the justice sector and to security sector reform. In Solomon Islands for example, Australia supported, through the Participating Police Force, the post-conflict recruitment and retention of female officers to the local police force. The early involvement of women, and the integration of a gender-perspective, led directly to the establishmen to critical domestic violence and sexual abuse services. More fundamentally, it also underwrote the broader processes of community rebuilding.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    While our country has periodically taken part in these debates, our comments today are special significance since this is our first speech following Chile's election as a non-permanent member of the Council for the period 2014-2015. We reiterate our commitment to the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) (2000), bearing in mind that 2015 will mark the fifteenth anniversary of that instrument, which has enabled us to progress, among other goals, in the promotion of women to positions of leadership, the prevention of gender-based violence in situations of conflict and post-conflict, and the creation of national plans in various countries, including Chile.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    We note the progress to date in the system as a whole and at the regional and national levels with regard to best practices, national plans, indicators and training. However, we are concerned by the persistent deficit in the number of women in leadership positions, as well as the lack of opportunities for them to rise to such positions. At the same time, we express our concern at the ongoing decline, as described in the report, in the number of women represented at the middle and high levels of mission leadership staff, the scarcity of data broken down by gender and age, and the gaps in financing.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    We agree with the recommendations in the report about the need to promote sustainable budgets for the work, so as to strengthen women's organizations working at the national levels and to train women leaders of peace movements. While appreciating the work of the experts deployed in the field, we consider it essential to provide training at the system and national levels not only for those providing direct leadership in that area, but also to those performing management functions, whatever their role. My delegation agrees on the need to accelerate women's access to the political arena and to support transitional justice reform as a peacebuilding guarantee.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    Chile will continue promoting the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), convinced as it is of the important role played by women in the prevention and resolution of conflicts and of the need to increase their participation in decision-making processes.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    I thank you, Sir, for organizing this debate. I also thank all those who have spoken. I believe that the statements made by my colleagues have proven, 13 years after the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), what has become obvious to everyone, namely, that no conflict can be resolved and no transition sustained without the inclusion and participation of half of humankind.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    First, that is obvious to the Council, which in two-thirds of its resolutions makes references to the women, peace and security agenda. It also obvious to the United Nations, where the presence of women in mediation teams and field missions increases year after year, although efforts still need to be made regarding management positions. In that regard, I welcome the work of UN Women and its activities to strengthen the coherence of and coordinate efforts to promote women within the United Nations. We also welcome the zero- tolerance policy for United Nations personnel that is being implemented by the Secretary-General, and which has proven to be useful and should continue.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    In New York, the issue of the participation of women should be included more frequently in briefings made to the Council by the Department of Peacekeeping Operations and the Department of Political Affairs, whose recommendations for better including women in conflict-resolution processes always prove to be valuable. Informal meetings of the Council with women working in the field should be continued and encouraged.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    To make the fight against impunity tangible, access for women to the justice system is essential. Since 2011, in cooperation with UN Women, France has had in place a programme for strengthening women's access to justice in Afghanistan. In the framework of its plan of action, France has committed to a cooperation programme in Africa and in the Arab world, working in partnership with UN Women. We have recently specifically allocated support for programmes in Mali being implemented by local non-governmental organizations (NGOs), with a view to supporting the participation of women in political processes. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, we have similarly allocated more than €2 million to support Congolese NGOs to fight against sexual violence, strengthen the participation of women in decision-making processes and help women integrate on the socioeconomic level. In that spirit, next December France will organize in Paris a summit on peace and security in Africa, which will provide an opportunity for all to express and reaffirm their commitment to bringing about support for resolutions on women and peace and security.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    Despite some positive steps, including the number of women serving in important and very senior Government positions, women's parliamentary representation in the Pacific is the lowest of any region in the world. The region has recently witnessed and continues to be affected by armed conflict, civil unrest and local-level conflicts over resources, as well as increasingly violent crimes and political crises. Women and children constitute a disproportionate number of those affected. Women face a variety of security challenges in the Pacific, including water and food security, loss of land, violence, and economic empowerment. A range of potential drivers is apparent, rangining from economic inequalities, land, governance, alienated youth, urban migration and inter-group tensions, with results that inevitably disrupt the lives of women and their families and increase the risk of sexual and gender-based violence.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    In many violent situations in the Pacific region, women have demonstrated their capacity to contribute to solutions as mediators, providers of safe havens, or in working to improve local communities. Women and young women have also played an important part in conflict prevention, management and recovery in the region. Women have generally been first to actively work across ethnic divides, despite considerable risks.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    The Pacific region is working to achieve better participation in formal conflict prevention and management and post-conflict recovery efforts, as well as oversight and accountability mechanisms for the security sector. The region recognizes the value of having women at the negotiating table in leadership roles and the need to provide sufficient recognition and resources to ensure that they are able to do their work.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    We thank the Secretary- General, the Executive Director of UN Women, High Commissioner Pillay and Ms. Brigitte Balipou, the representative of the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security, for their active involvement and valuable contributions. We also welcome the unanimous adoption of resolution 2122 (2013) by the Council earlier today, calling for higher levels of women's involvement in peacekeeping and peacebuilding. It is undeniable that the role, views and leadership of women are essential if we are to truly make and sustain peace.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    As a country that hosts tens of thousands of refugees as a result of aggression and war imposed on Armenia, we attach particular importance to this debate. It is nothing new to say that the costs of conflicts are borne disproportionately by women and girls and, since it is primarily women who pay the price when peace is absent, they are important stakeholders in peacebuilding. As such, the inclusion of women in all stages of peace processes guarantees a more lasting and representative settlement.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    To further promote the application of the women, peace and security agenda, Armenia encourages the Council to continue its efforts and to ensure the consistent and regular application of the agenda across all areas. The Security Council should recognize its own role to create opportunities for women to participate and exercise leadership.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    We also believe that without women's civil society strength and women's leadership, there will be no effective prevention. Women's experiences of violence during and after conflict are much broader, and effective protection from all forms of violence and violations will be possible only through their empowerment and participation.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    The scourge of sexual violence in armed conflict has rightly been the subject of attention by the Council. It is warranted that we also focus on the importance of furthering the equal rights of women and their right to equal participation in decision-making processes.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    The rule of law makes available to vulnerable groups, such as women, normative tools that promote their empowerment and emancipation. It is essential to uphold the equal rights of women by ensuring their full participation in governing institutions and the judicial system. We must reaffirm the need to establish a legislative framework that secures their full access to justice.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    The participation of women in conflict resolution and mediation processes not only contributes to the elaboration of balanced rules in post-conflict situations, but is also an important factor in achieving sustainable peace. Unfortunately, there is a long way to go before women are fully and duly integrated into national and multilateral peace efforts around the world. Viewed from different points of view, such as the number of women delegates and mediators; the numbers, substance and relative importance of provisions in peace agreements; and post-conflict strategies or policies, women's participation in peace and security is still insufficient.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    Brazil believes that supporting and promoting women's participation in the maintenance of international peace and security is an increasingly important aspect of the Security Council's responsibility under the Charter. In that vein, we encourage further reflection and debates on the role of women in promoting the prevention and peaceful settlement of disputes.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    The EU Concept on Strengthening EU Mediation and Dialogue Capacities aims to promote the representation of women and the availability of adequate resources for dedicated gender expertise at an early stage of the mediation process. We call on the United Nations system to increase the participation of women in mediation activities, including as chief and lead mediators, and to include gender experts in the mediation teams. Supporting women's civil society groups is crucial to developing domestic constituencies for women's engagement in conflict resolution.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    The European Union supports the work aimed at increasing the role of women in the prevention and resolution of conflicts and in peacebuilding, promoting women's equal participation in all efforts for the promotion of peace and security and providing an integrated approach to prevent and punish acts of sexual violence, as well as to bring justice, services and reparation to its victims.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    I wish to express my appreciation to you, Mr. President, for organizing today's important open debate. Your well-rounded concept note (S/2013/587, annex) is indeed very useful in providing us with the clear objective of our debate on the issue. We also express our gratitude to the Secretary-General, the High Commissioner for Human Rights, the Executive Director of UN Women and the representative of the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security, whose remarks serve as a good basis for our focus at today's meeting. The theme of the meeting is well-chosen and timely, particularly as we continue to advance the agenda to strengthen the role and engagement of women in peace processes.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    The resolution 2122 (2013), adopted this morning, is another clear ref lection of the strong resolve of the Council concerning the critical role of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, peacebuilding and peacekeeping. We are particularly appreciative of the fact that the resolution provides a good reference on supporting the development and strengthening of the capacities of national institutions in order to provide sustainable assistance to women and girls affected by armed conflict and post-conflict situations.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    The critical role of women in all stages of and throughout any peace process has been reaffirmed in various United Nations resolutions and documents — not the least, of course, in resolution 1325 (2000) and its subsequent texts. The recent declaration adopted by the Peacebuilding Commission on women's economic empowerment in peacekeeping showcases yet another unyielding commitment from Member States to support the participation of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, peacebuilding and post-conflict economic recovery. The declaration also reaffirms the primary responsibility of national authorities in identifying their priorities and strategies for post- conflict peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    It is a matter of regret that respecting the rule of law in conflict situations continues to be a significant challenge for the international community. In our view, that is a strong reason for inclusive peace negotiations that produce peace that is durable, sustainable and long- lasting. It is also reason for including the participation and engagement of women in that process. We also believe that national reconciliation, as one tool of transitional justice, must benefit from the active participation of women. Indonesia, in that regard, agrees with the call made by the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations last year that lasting progress on security, national reconciliation, human rights, the rule of law and sustainable development needs to occur in parallel, given the interconnected nature of those challenges in countries emerging from conflict.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    Indonesia is steadfast in its commitment to ensuring women's participation at all levels of conflict prevention, conflict resolution and peacebuilding, and it has been undertaking various measures at home to that effect, in close partnership with civil society, including women's organizations.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    Finally, Indonesia reiterates the importance of the international community working in a concerted manner to improve women's participation during all stages of peace processes, particularly in conflict resolution, post-conflict planning and peacebuilding, including by enhancing their engagement in political and economic decision-making at the early stages of recovery processes.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    Hard tools, such as sanctions regimes that target perpetrators of sexual violence and appropriately mandated and trained peacekeeping missions, are effective instruments for the protection agenda, but the participation dimension of the women and peace and security agenda still requires targeted action by the Council. Indeed, the Council's role in addressing women's political participation in the peace and security agenda remains a challenge. That makes today's debate on the role of women in transitional justice even more important.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    In June, when the Secretary-General's Special Envoy for the Great Lakes Region, Mary Robinson, made her first statement to the United Nations family in her new role, she spoke of women not as victims but as stakeholders. She questioned the sustainability of any peace that half the population has had no role in building and she called for women to be put at the core of peacebuilding. New Zealand agrees. If it is going to deliver lasting and sustainable peace, then, as the representative of Austria just emphasized, transitional justice must incorporate the entire population. Women's perspectives must be included in the design, implementation and monitoring of transitional justice processes.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    Beyond simply being a just democratic principle, there are many tangible reasons for that. It builds trust in post-conflict justice institutions, and UN Women's research shows that women are more likely to report sexual and gender-based crimes to transitional justice institutions that involve women judges and officials. The Council should also make clear that there must be prominent roles for women, both as leaders and as active participants in the consultative processes that establish transitional arrangements.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    New Zealand's experience, in its own region and beyond is that credible, informal and tradition-based justice systems have a demonstrated role in establishing accountability. In post-conflict societies, it is often informal justice mechanisms that are the most accessible for justice, mediation and conflict resolution. While some informal and traditional systems struggle to adequately address women's needs due to inherent gender biases, examples from Africa show the value of local efforts to transform such institutions in a manner that allows for the full participation for women.

  • Country

    Rwanda
  • Extracts

    Our Government considers violence against women and girls as an assault on human dignity. Over the years, we have created a favourable environment for gender equality, women's empowerment and children's rights. We have demonstrated a strong political will to end the scourge by adopting supportive policies and legal frameworks, which include a gender- sensitive Constitution and laws on the prevention and punishment of gender-based violence and on the protection of children from violence. As Ambassador Power stated, our new parliament — our lower Chamber of Deputies — attests to the fruitfulness of the policies on our agenda, as recent elections raised women's representation in that body at 64 per cent.

  • Country

    Rwanda
  • Extracts

    As we gather today, 13 years after the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), we believe that it is fair to make an assessment of how effective the implementation of the resolution has been, and possibly draw lessons for the way forward. Despite the improved practice in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), we note that there remains a deficit in opportunities for women to exercise leadership and that there is a continued underrepresentation of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, protection and peacebuilding processes. Both the international community and Member States will need to deploy greater efforts to address those issues and maintain previous gains with a view to reducing the inequalities observed at various levels in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    It goes without saying that the fight against impunity can be waged only in the context of a rule of law that establishes effective transitional justice and promotes the effective participation of victims, including women, in the country's reconstruction. Unfortunately, with regard to participation, the fact is that women have played a minor role, if they have not been totally sidelined, in peace talks and reconciliation and in political and economic activities. As an illustration, in 2012 women comprised fewer than 8 per cent of the members of negotiating delegations in peace processes.

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    However, we acknowledge the efforts of some countries that have integrated gender issues into their national legislation by setting a quota for women in elected positions and high-level decision-making, as is the case in such post-conflict countries as Timor- Leste, Afghanistan, Liberia, Haiti and the Democratic

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    "Republic of the Congo. Rwanda, of course, sets the most progressive example in that respect. Togo encourages the United Nations to assist countries that have not yet done so to integrate into their national systems the experience of those who have managed to increase the role of women in peace processes and post-conflict reconstruction."

  • Speaker

    African Union
  • Extracts

    The African Union looks forward to the adoption of the policy framework and remains convinced that this document will be make a significant contribution to “comprehensively promote justice and accountability in ways that further the equal rights of women and the right to equal participation in decision-making” (S/2013/587, annex, p. 2).

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    A central element of our understanding of the rule of law is that it not only guarantees women's equal rights but necessarily implies women's equal participation in political and public life, as well as their economic empowerment. While the full, equal and meaningful participation of women in all conflict prevention, resolution and peacebuilding efforts is at the heart of resolution 1325 (2000) and should be self- evident 13 years after its adoption, there is no reason for complacency.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    We call on the Security Council to make the best use of the time frame leading up to the high- level review of the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in 2015 and to mainstream measures to enhance women's participation in its work, including in the mandates of peacekeeping and political missions. Our immediate concern must be to increase the number of women in police and military contingents in United Nations peacekeeping operations. In that regard, we welcome today's adoption of resolution 2122 (2013) and its references to the deployment of women in United Nations peacekeeping operations as well as more regular briefings in the Security Council.

  • Country

    Belgium
  • Extracts

    With regard to full participation in establishing the rule of law, which means placing women at the centre of the decision-making processes in the post-conflict rebuilding phase, while giving particular attention to justice and security sector reform. Spain believes that that is the only way to end the discrimination that makes women suffer disproportionate violations of their rights during conflicts. It also enhances safeguards to ensure that such discrimination is not repeated.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    With regard to the most recent report of the Secretary- General (S/2013/525), we note with satisfaction that the attention from the international community to the issue of sexual violence in conflict has increased. We therefore call upon all stakeholders to continue their efforts to reduce and eliminate the high incidence of threats faced by women and girls in contemporary armed conflicts. However, we realize that despite the urgency with which practices in implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) have improved, there remains a deficit in opportunities for women on both the national and international levels. To exercise leadership, there remains an ongoing underrepresentation of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, protection and peacebuilding processes and efforts.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Conflicts create situations in which women and children are the ones most affected by the deterioration of living conditions and fundamental rights. Violence and the deprivation of rights often go hand in hand with conflict. Efforts to fight impunity, provide assistance to victims and hold perpetrators accountable must be intensified and better coordinated. Regrettably, sexual and gender-based violence often continue after peace deals are reached, due to insufficient investment in protection and prevention strategies, or weak security and justice institutions. We are aware of the fact that peace cannot be sustained unless women play a critical role in the process. We therefore underscore the importance of the full and effective involvement of women at all stages of peace processes and of giving them an equal role in the prevention and resolution of conflicts, as well as in early peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    We also emphasize that Bosnia and Herzegovina fully supports the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), the provisions of which have been incorporated into the Bosnia and Herzegovina gender action plan and the action plan for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). Besides defining goals and activities, the action plan includes an introduction, an analysis of the de facto situations, and eight goals with strictly defined activities, deadlines, the definition of responsibility and partners. In this regard, through the action plan, we have shown our dedication to increasing the representation of women in decision-making positions at all levels of power in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In addition, we are undertaking efforts to increase the number of women in military and police forces and to ensure their inclusion in executive positions within such forces.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Increasing the number of women in peacekeeping missions and introducing gender perspectives into the training of participants in peace missions are further priorities for us. We are also making additional efforts to strengthen capacities in fighting trafficking, decreasing the danger of mined areas, improving support networks for women and girls who were victimized during the war, and increasing the knowledge and capacities of civil society. Furthermore, the gender equality agency started a project on the implementation of the resolution 1325 (2000) action plan at the local level in cooperation with the non-governmental organization Women BH and with the financial support of UN Women. This project represents an innovation not only in Bosnia and Herzegovina but also at the regional level.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    Estonia is dedicated to protecting and promoting human rights and fundamental freedoms, both nationally and internationally. As a member of the Human Rights Council, our particular focus is on the rights of women and children, gender perspective in conflict settlements and the fight against impunity. Estonia firmly believes that the rule of law in conflict and post-conflict situations must promote justice and accountability in ways that further the rights of women, including through legal and institutional reforms that are gender sensitive. The equal right to decision-making and participation, along with women's empowerment, is crucial to ensure a functioning society and peace and justice in the aftermath of conflicts.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    Additionally, as stated in the Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525), women's representation in the justice sector plays a significant role in increasing the reporting of crimes and enhancing public trust in the rule of law institutions. The importance of prevention must likewise be stressed. By enabling women to fully participate in judicial systems, we can better tackle the root causes of impunity for violence against women.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Secondly, 43 countries have adopted national action plans on women, peace and security. That is an important first step. However, any progress on the ground depends on the political will to abide by those commitments. The German national action plan, which was adopted last year, covers the four focus areas set out in resolution 1325 (2000) and additionally includes the areas of preparation for peace missions and the prosecution of crimes. The implementation of the action plan is monitored by an inter-ministerial working group in collaboration with representatives from civil society. German diplomatic missions abroad have been instructed to support the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), for example by advocating for the inclusion of women in local crisis prevention, conflict management and post-conflict peacebuilding or by supporting gender-sensitive projects on the ground.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Germany will continue its support to UN Women and all other relevant actors, including civil society organizations, to ensure that women's roles and their important contribution in conflict resolution and peacebuilding are adequately taken into account.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    Among others, resolution 2106 (2013) underlines the importance of women's greater participation and leadership in decision-making processes in areas of conflict. In many cases, women are excluded from decision-making. Nevertheless, their full and equal participation in peacemaking and peacebuilding is indispensable for the success of those processes, since it is the only way to ensure that the needs of women involved in conflict-related situations are effectively addressed. Women must be seen not solely as victims, but as active agents of change and of peacekeeping.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    The rule of law should address justice, equality and equity with a strong focus on the empowerment of women and girls, gender equality, and preventing and combating violence against women as essential preconditions for equitable and inclusive sustainable development. In that context, we praise the work of the United Nations in assisting Member States to address rule of law issues in conflict contexts and we consider it vital that the United Nations continues to emphasize the importance of providing redress and assistance to victims in conflict, post-conflict and other crisis situations.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    To ensure genuine rule of law, beyond the formal establishment of institutions, judicial systems need to be fully accessible to all individuals and groups. A major obstacle to access is the cost involved in legal advice and legal representation services. We support the work of the United Nations to implement a wide variety of projects focused on providing legal aid to address that obstacle.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, Greece is of the view that genuine and inclusive participation in the elaboration of transitional justice mechanisms ensures that they not only respond to the needs and expectations of victims, but provide transformative change for sustainable transition to peace and reconciliation, which is the ultimate goal of all of our efforts.

  • Country

    Guatemala
  • Extracts

    Although so far the Council has held seven debates on the issue of the rule of law, there is still a way to go to achieve overall accountability for crimes affecting women and girls. Nor have we made sufficient progress in achieving women's full participation in the processes of transitional justice. Similarly, there is room to improve the analysis of sex-differentiated effects on women and girls when the rule of law is violated during and after conflicts.

  • Country

    Guatemala
  • Extracts

    Moreover, my country wishes to acknowledge the work of UN Women, whose establishment was a singularly important institutional step forward, among other things to promote the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). We support greater participation by women in peacebuilding and strengthening civil capacity after conflicts to be consistent with the issue of women and peace and security. We believe that it is necessary to recognize women as builders of peace and stability.

  • Country

    Guatemala
  • Extracts

    Finally, we believe that the fifteenth anniversary of the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), in 2015, will provide not only the Security Council but the entire United Nations system an opportunity to review the levels of implementation of that resolution and to renew commitments to combat violence, including sexual violence. We urge all Member States and the United Nations system to facilitate greater participation by women in that area.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    My delegation welcomes the report of the Secretary- General on women, peace and security (S/2013/525) and the adoption of resolution 2122 (2013) on the issue. The report takes stock of the actions and initiatives of Member States in the framework of implementation of the resolution, especially in strengthening women's participation in decision-making, integrating gender- specific issues in peacekeeping operations and training staff who participate in those operations. The report confirms that much work remains, despite the significant progress of women's participation in peacekeeping operations and their representation in the decision-making process.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    The signing of peace agreements and ceasefire agreements and the implementation of national action plans and programmes for the protection of women in conflict-affected countries have made it possible to identify, in a more appropriate way, the ways and means likely to promote women's rights and to strengthen their participation in efforts to prevent and resolve conflicts and in post-conflict reconstruction.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    Firm political will and full commitment of Member States to the measures in resolution 1325 (2000) will guarantee the active participation of women in national, regional and international institutions for the prevention, protection and management of conflict situations.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    While it is obvious that States have the primary responsibility for ensuring that the Resolutions on Women, Peace and Security are translated into action, regional organizations working on the maintenance of international peace and security such as the OSCE, also have a recognized role. Both the recent Presidential Statement on cooperation with regional organizations, passed in August of this year by the Council, and several of the Women, Peace and Security resolutions refer to the crucial contribution of regional organizations in affirming the participation of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution mechanisms and peace-building.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    The OSCE participating States have acknowledged the importance of the Women, Peace and Security agenda by passing a number of Ministerial Council Decisions, among others one explicitly dedicated to increasing Women's Participation in Conflict Prevention, Crisis Management and Post-Conflict Rehabilitation and another dealing with the Elements of the Conflict Cycle to include 1325 commitments. As a result, the OSCE has taken a number of initiatives both at the Secretariat level as well as at the level of its Field Operations to implement these MC Decisions, particularly in conflict affected contexts in the OSCE region.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    Within the politico-military dimension the OSCE Forum for Security Co-operation promotes the inclusion of women in the military, including in combat positions, making sure that civilian oversight and the human rights in the armed forces are guaranteed for both men and women.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    As I said, the OSCE is the world's largest regional security organization and it plays an important role throughout the region also in mediation, dialogue facilitation, good offices and quiet diplomacy. The organization has increased its efforts to ensuring that these processes are inclusive. We are pleased to announce that next week in Istanbul, on 24 October, the OSCE will launch a Guidance Note on Gender-Responsive Mediation. The purpose of the guidance note is to increase women's participation in mediation, dialogues and quiet diplomacy initiatives, but also to strengthen the capacity of mediators to understand how the substantive concerns of both men and women can be included in these processes and what the benefits of inclusivity for the sustainability of conflict resolution and reconciliation are. We are grateful to UN DPA and the Mediation Support Unit for an inspiring co-operation in the preparation of this Guidance Note.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    Allow me at this point, Mr. President, to refer to one more issue that we believe is important also in the framework of today's debate. The OSCE is a leader in a key peace and security issue that is not discussed enough from a “Women, Peace and Security” perspective: integrating a gender perspective in combating violent extremism and radicalization that leads to terrorism. This is an issue of serious concern to OSCE participating States. Both national authorities and international and regional organizations increasingly recognize that a better understanding of the dynamics of this issue is central to formulating and implementing effective strategies that will increase stability and security. The OSCE will undertake a new initiative in 2014 in partnership with the Global Counter-Terrorism Forum that aims to promote gender-sensitive strategies, policies and measures to counter violent extremism and radicalization that leads to terrorism, with an emphasis on empowering women to contribute to these efforts in different roles and capacities.

  • Country

    Pakistan
  • Extracts

    "The discourse on women and peace and security has followed two broad trends — women seen primarily as victims of conflict, on the one hand, and women as stakeholders and drivers of change, on the other hand. Both aspects are interrelated and require equal attention. As the Secretary-General said this morning, it is important that women's representation around the peace table be enhanced. But to enable women to act as agents of change, we need to invest more in capacity- building and training and in the economic and political empowerment of women."

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    We are convinced of the significantly positive potential of women's participation in various aspects of the settlement of armed conflict and post-conflict reconstruction. Women must not only be seen as victims

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    I do want to welcome the adoption today of the resolution on Women and Peace and Security. This resolution reiterates the central role for women in resolving conflict and helping to build sustainable peace. I want in particular to highlight three aspects of the resolution.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    First of all, it places Women, Peace and Security front and centre in the Council's work. The Secretary- General has outlined what that means for the Council and his own personal commitment to this, but it also means, in a very practical sense, that the Council will now receive more regular briefings and more updates from UN bodies and officials on this subject. That means that it is central to our work. Secondly, the Resolution highlights the need for women's participation in areas affected by conflict. We've asked that Special-Representatives and Special-Envoys in all UN Missions regularly to consult Women's organisations from early on in their deployment. Their voices must be heard and needs taken into account in all conflict resolution and peace-building processes. Third, the Resolution makes clear the Council's commitment to a meaningful review of the implementation of this agenda in 2015 as the Secretary-General emphasised in his remarks earlier. This review must be based on clear data and we have therefore requested the Secretary- General to commission a global study on the remaining gaps and challenges.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    The United Kingdom welcomes the report of the Secretary General and the important recommendations that it makes. We welcome the ongoing work of UN Women. And we recognise the continuing challenges in implementing this agenda lie beyond the topic of today's debate. In conflict settings worldwide women continue to be seen merely victims of violence rather than leaders of change, as those to be protected rather than respected and included as equal participants in all decision making processes. As Ms Mlambo- ngcuka said, women are central to leadership. Since the end of the Cold War, women have represented only 4 percent of signatories to peace agreements, less than 3 percent of mediators of peace talks, and less than 10 percent of anyone sitting at the table to negotiate on behalf of a party to conflict. Excluding 50% of society will never lead to stable and lasting peace. Peace can only be achieved with women's active participation and leadership.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Fourthly, the effective participation of women is an important foundation for realizing sustainable peace and social stability. Women should become important participants in conflict prevention and mediation, and they should enjoy adequate rights when it comes to decision-making and participation in post-conflict peacebuilding and national development. That is in the interests of changing their vulnerable status, while maintaining their rights and interests in practical terms.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Women's development is the foundation for truly realizing their empowerment. The international community should promote socioeconomic development and thereby effectively enhance the status of women and promote their positive contributions to the maintenance of international peace and security.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    What distinguishes today's resolution from others is that it represents a pivot away from a narrow focus on women as victims and towards the more positive and liberating agenda of women's participation and women's leadership. Welcome attention is paid to the active role that women and women's groups can play in transforming conflict, insecurity and fragility. That aspect has been insufficiently highlighted. It is often overshadowed by the appalling suffering inflicted on women through, for example, sexual violence in conflict.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    We should, however, recognize the profoundly positive contribution to be made to conflict resolution by the empowerment of women, allied to the treatment of women and men on equal terms. Peace is more effectively secured when women are involved. Peace initiatives that have strong participation by women tend to be more resilient than those that do not. There is no denying the moral imperative for equal treatment between women and men.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    Fortunately, as the report of the Secretary- General of 4 September (S/2013/525) acknowledges, times of transition and flux can present opportunities to strengthen women's leadership, empowerment and rights in the process of restoring the rule of law and governance systems. As his report indicates, the participation of women in peace negotiations and donor conferences has increased over the past year. Active support for such participation, which is being provided by gender experts and women's civil society organizations, is growing, and some peace agreements have included gender-sensitive language. That is encouraging. Yet the progress being made is hard fought and uneven.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    In order to protect women's rights and ensure women's participation in conflict-affected situations, security for those who serve to uphold the rule of law, such as police officers and judges, is a basic necessity. In that regard, gender-responsive transitional justice measures and justice system reforms need to be addressed. In particular, women's access to the justice system must be strengthened so as to protect their rights, as well as to protect them from the violence that too often accompanies the transition from conflict. To that end, Japan has, for example, supported various efforts to assist victims of sexual violence in refugee camps located in such countries as the Sudan, Somalia and Iraq, by providing legal advice, representation and awareness-raising campaigns, as well as establishing relief and recovery systems that include mental health care.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    In order to realize a more peaceful society, Japan intends to make its utmost effort to ensure women's participation and incorporate a women's perspective into each and every phase of conflict prevention, conflict settlement and peacebuilding, including election processes. Such women's participation will also contribute to better protecting the rights and the physical well-being of women, including female human rights defenders, female political leaders and female war correspondents, who are particularly exposed to danger in times of conflict.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    In that context, one cannot but emphasize the importance of transitional justice. Not only does it allow the possibility to redress past wrongs, but it also affords an opportunity to transform women's situations, thereby guaranteeing lasting peace in a more egalitarian society. The participation of women at all levels and in a timely manner is indispensable to guarantee that the new society that emerges from the rubble of war will grant women their rightful place with the full enjoyment of all their rights.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    I would add that, in the past year, we supported a Department of Peacekeeping Operations project aimed at bolstering the role of women in the maintenance and building of peace, specifically by holding a regional workshop in Liberia to provide women leaders working for peace and security in West Africa an opportunity to share their experiences and to strengthen their networks.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    Malaysia welcomes today's adoption of the resolution 2122 (2013) on the issue discussed. My delegation hopes that there will be sufficient impetus toward the actual realization of the resolution and the landmark resolution 1325 (2000). Malaysia therefore appreciates the ongoing update on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in the Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525) of 4 September. As mentioned in the report, there remains a deficit in opportunities for women to exercise leadership, and women are still underrepresented in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, protection and peacebuilding processes. My delegation believes that the greater active participation of women in peacekeeping and peacebuilding would go a long way towards including a gender perspective and allowing women to shape peace.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    In that regard, there is a need to increase the number of women in high-level decision-making positions in peacekeeping and peacebuilding operations. Malaysia is also supportive of appointing more women protection advisers to monitor and report on sexual violence in all relevant situations. We appreciate the positive values they bring in creating greater awareness of sexual violence issues, reporting incidents of sexual violence and implementing Security Council resolutions on the ground.

  • Country

    Thailand
  • Extracts

    We are pleased that the Council has convened an open debate on this issue for the third time, which signals the importance the Council attaches to the issue of women. Women account for more than half of the world's population. Women's participation and the recognition of their special needs are essential. The issue of women and peace and security is multifaceted. We welcome today's discussion, which focuses on the role of women in transitional justice and the rule of law.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    Canada firmly believes that the participation of women in all decision-making processes, particularly those related to the prevention and resolution of conflict and the transition to democracy, is a necessary precondition to securing sustainable peace, as is their access to justice and their inclusion in the economic and social lives of their countries and communities. As the Honourable John Baird, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Canada, said in his address to the General Assembly last month:

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    “We must invest in opportunities for women and young girls. We must ensure that women participate fully in all parts of our society and in all the countries of the United Nations. That will help us build a stronger, more secure, more prosperous and more peaceful world” (A/68/PV.21, p. 2)

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    Particularly egregious is the practice of child, early and forced marriage, which puts the very lives of young girls at risk. That practice denies girls' rights, disrupts their access to education, severely jeopardizes their health and limits the development of their community as a whole. Conflict situations exacerbate that practice among displaced and refugee populations, such as we know to be the case in Syria. Canada encourages the Security Council to continue to provide political leadership and to take action to ensure the meaningful participation of women in conflict prevention, mediation and resolution processes.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    Prime Minister Harper and other leaders in New York recently reviewed progress on the 2010 Muskoka summit of the Group of Eight and the United Nations initiatives to improve to improve global maternal and child health. Under Canada's leadership, the Human Rights Council adopted the robust resolution 23/25 this past June on the elimination of violence against women. The resolution lays out actions to be undertaken by Member States and the United Nations to prevent sexual violence, including in conflict-related situations, and calls on States to ensure that women are active participants in decision-making processes.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    The need to protect women and girls must not overshadow the participation pillar of the women, peace and security agenda. My delegation is therefore pleased to see that resolution 2122 (2013), adopted earlier today, builds on the core elements of resolution 1325 (2000) and contains key commitments for several stakeholders to the full participation of women.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    Women's full participation — including in peacekeeping operations, national reconciliation processes and mediation — enhances the effectiveness and sustainability of development efforts and contributes to the prevention of conflict. But women continue to be underrepresented at all levels of decision-making. Their interests are often not, or insufficiently, reflected in peace agreements. Out of 10 peace agreements signed in 2012, only three included provisions on women and peace and security. Against that background, we welcome the Peacebuilding Commission's recent declaration on women's economic empowerment for peacebuilding. We have noted with great interest the Mediation Support Unit's commitment to increasing its efforts to include more women in mediation processes and the increased female capacity in that respect.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    We believe that it is important that the United Nations lead by example to advance this agenda. The appointment of Mary Robinson as the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for the Great Lakes Region of Africa is therefore a very important step in that respect. We welcome the Special Envoy's active engagement to involve women and ensure their participation in mediation efforts.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    My country is currently moving forward with a review process of our legal and institutional framework with the aim of ensuring its confirmity with a plan of action for comprehensive implementation of the resolution. The process seeks to systematize some of the activities that are already being developed at the internal level, such as educating the armed forces on women's rights. In order to do so, we are in regular contact with various partners so as to learn the best practices already being used for similar action plans. Concerning political rights, our executive authorities recently proposed an initiative to the legislature aimed at ensuring women's equitable representation in the Chamber of Deputies and the Senate. With regard to the United Nations mandate, we are striving to increase the number of women on the lists of candidates for high-level posts, particularly those having to do with political operations and, of course, peacekeeping.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    Mexico welcomes the adoption of the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict, and commends the initiative taken to formulate an international protocol for investigating and documenting sexual violence in conflict. We assure the Council that we will continue to support such efforts. Similarly, we consider it vital to continue to push for women's participation in mediation processes and peace agreement and ceasefire negotiations so as to encourage national reconciliation, based on respect for and enjoyment of the human, social and civil rights of the most vulnerable groups. We believe it essential to support national reconciliation and dialogue processes with judicial change that ensures that justice is impartially meted out, and including programmes for repairing and reconstructing the social fabric.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    Strengthening inclusive and solid societies must be an essential part in re-establishing the rule of law, both in societies living with armed conflict and those that are undergoing the process of reconstruction and reconciliation. There can be no lasting peace without justice, and it is therefore vital to ensure that national dialogue and reconciliation processes contribute effectively to fighting impunity and ensuring not only that women take part in the processes of reform of the security and justice systems but that they are also full participants in those systems once they are reformed.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    In that regard, we note the Declaration facilitated by Mexico and Denmark and adopted at the High-level Meeting of the General Assembly on the Rule of Law at the National and International Levels in September 2012. The text enshrines “the importance of ensuring that women...fully enjoy the benefits of the rule of law” (General Assembly resolution 67/1, para. 16), and we committed to ensuring their full participation in institutions of governance and the judicial system.

  • Country

    Qatar
  • Extracts

    Thirteen years after the adoption of the historic resolution 1325 (2000), the culmination of a long process concerning women and international peace and security, the Security Council is still considering the issue. Our debates, however, reveal shortcomings in the area of the rights of women, which are being terribly violated, particularly in the Arab world. The Security Council has established several criteria for women's contributions to settling conflicts and their role in conflict and post-conflict situations. Those criteria should be implemented, in conformity with Security Council provisions, in order to achieve the goals of women's participation in conflict resolution and the reconstruction of society in the aftermath of conflict. Women should be integrated into peace negotiations and into social reconstruction. Their participation at every level is still incomplete. Their access to transitional justice systems must be facilitated, including in relation to crimes committed in conflict, especially since women and children are victims of particular types of crime and subject to discrimination, and they face social and cultural impediments that hinder their access to justice mechanisms.

  • Country

    Qatar
  • Extracts

    The State of Qatar understands the importance of the rule of law and of strengthening women's participation and promoting women's and girls' rights in post-conflict reconstruction and conflict resolution. Their participation should be strengthened in order to enable them to function in the political arena, particularly through a collection of initiatives enabling their comprehensive inclusion.

  • Country

    Slovenia
  • Extracts

    Rebuilding justice and the rule of law is critical to any post-conflict transitional process burdened by the legacies of mass atrocities, serious human-rights violations and a weakened judicial infrastructure. A gender perspective, as well as the participation of women, should be injected into those processes. Transitional justice processes should address the full range of conflict-related violations of women's rights. As particularly vulnerable victims in conflict-affected situations, women experience grave consequences from breakdowns in the rule of law, in the form of a range of violations including, but not limited to, sexual and gender-based violence. In that context, Slovenia particularly welcomes the reference to the need for access to a full range of sexual and reproductive health services in the resolution adopted today (2122 (2013)).

  • Country

    Slovenia
  • Extracts

    Addressing abhorrent violations by ensuring access to justice, formal and informal, as well as full rights of redress, is essential to the process of reconciliation and lasting peace. Importantly, preventing impunity for the perpetrators of such crimes decreases the chance that they will recur in the future. Furthermore, the representation of women should be ensured in the justice sector. Eliminating violence against women and violations of their social and economic rights is a prerequisite for ensuring their full participation in recovery. Gender-sensitive legal and institutional reforms that conform with international standards are therefore needed.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    In 2015, the Security Council will hold a high- level meeting to review the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). The Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525) includes strategic measures to accelerate implementation, of which I would like to highlight three recommendations: increasing women's participation in United Nations peacekeeping and political missions, especially at the middle — and senior-management levels; reaching the target of 15 per cent spending for post-conflict peacebuilding projects on gender equality and women's empowerment; and systematically addressing all elements of resolution 1325 (2000) in the work of the Security Council.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    It is increasingly evident that the rule of law is all too often the second victim of conflict, the first victims being women and girls. Portugal reaffirms the view that women and girls are disproportionately affected by armed conflicts and remain particularly vulnerable in post-conflict situations. Sexual and gender-based violence, child and forced marriages and disruption in education, to name but a few of the facts of conflict, are magnified when it comes to women and girls. The Security Council has repeatedly acknowledged that fact and must continue to act on such a basis. On the other hand, there is a tendency to consider transitional justice as the second-to-last concern of peace agreements, the last being the participation of women in peace agreements.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    It is our firm belief that only through the systematic and active participation of women in peace processes can transitional justice truly assume a national dimension and lay the foundations for rebuilding the rule of law and reconciliation. We have been witnessing the very important role women can plan in reconciliation processes when they are included from the outset.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    Portugal feels particularly encouraged by the rising awareness regarding those issues, and by the efforts made at the United Nations and national levels to increase expertise in several areas, such as mediation and capacity-building for the political participation of women, whether as candidates, electoral observers or office holders.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    The Council has heard, on a regular basis and and directly from the ground, requests for further strengthening the implementation of protection mandates. We hope that the targets set by the Department of Peacekeeping Operations of 20 per cent for female police participation in peacekeeping operations by 2014 will be attained. Portugal continues to develop policies to promote the recruitment and retention of women in the military and in the police forces, and looks forward to cooperate further in training and in sharing good practices with other troop and police-contributing countries.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    The report of the Secretary-General clearly notes a positive trend in women's participation in mediation processes and the negotiation of peace agreements. However, the inclusion of matters that directly affect women and their rights in such agreements is still insufficient. That is what the United Nations Working Group on the issue of discrimination against women in law and in practice points out in its latest report. The Working Group expresses concern for the fact that the gender perspective is not sufficiently taken into account in transitional processes, which will result in a less inclusive peace.

Peace Processes
  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    In the wake of such suffering, we understand that inadequate governance and limited resources may complicate the task of recovery and healing. There is, however, one standard we can live up to regardless of the situation -- and that is the principle of inclusion; whether a country is rich or poor, there is no excuse for denying women fair representation when negotiating the terms of the peace, when enacting laws or in forging a conflict free future. And here, the United Nations should be a standard setter and, according to the Secretary General's September report, some important progress is being made.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Notably greater involvement of women — from mediation, restoring the rule of law and governance to participation in post-conflict electoral processes — continues to require commitment and attention. It also requires greater dedicated resourcing, particularly for civil society groups working on the ground.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    We welcome the Security Council's adoption of resolution 2122 (2013), especially as it seeks to place women at the table for negotiations and peace talks. Women generally represent a majority constituency in societies, and as such should not be excluded from the negotiation table in conflict-affected States. South Africa is supportive of such an approach, especially as our own history has taught us about the powerful role that women play in bringing about peace and stability. We also believe that women should play a role beyond that, one that includes securing a larger stake in political leadership and policy- and decision-making positions, both in the public and private sectors.

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    Argentina would like to emhasize the need for a gender perspective and for crimes against women to be incorporated into the agenda of peace negotiations. To that end, we need women in decision-making positions and at all stages of the peace process. We know that women are victims of widespread violence at the hands of all parties involved in a conflict. We also know that sexual violence in conflict is not a new phenomenon, rather it is a powerful weapon used to destroy not merely the life of a woman but also to destroy families, communities, ethnic groups or entire nations.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    For countries emerging from conflict, peace processes often lead to institutional reforms that establish new political, economic and social orders. Women's early participation in peace talks is critical, not only to their effectiveness, but to underpinning women's longer-term empowerment. Formal peace processes must reflect the reality that women are already undertaking peace work in their communities, and serving as agents of change as part of efforts to keep the fabric of conflict-affected societies together.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    We agree with the recommendations in the report about the need to promote sustainable budgets for the work, so as to strengthen women's organizations working at the national levels and to train women leaders of peace movements. While appreciating the work of the experts deployed in the field, we consider it essential to provide training at the system and national levels not only for those providing direct leadership in that area, but also to those performing management functions, whatever their role. My delegation agrees on the need to accelerate women's access to the political arena and to support transitional justice reform as a peacebuilding guarantee.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    However, we all know that we only are half-way there. Much remains to be done. While women now have a place in most peace negotiations, their situation remains ignored in the ensuing agreements, which too often do not include specific provisions on women, peace and security. Women should be consulted as fully invested stakeholders. The United Nations must be exemplary in that regard. The special representatives and special envoys of the Secretary-General must consult with civil society and women's organizations as soon as they arrive on the ground, and must continue to do so throughout their mandate.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    In New York, the issue of the participation of women should be included more frequently in briefings made to the Council by the Department of Peacekeeping Operations and the Department of Political Affairs, whose recommendations for better including women in conflict-resolution processes always prove to be valuable. Informal meetings of the Council with women working in the field should be continued and encouraged.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    In Syria, women were the leading actors of the peaceful revolution against the regime of Bashar Al-Assad. Their vulnerability is today increasing everywhere, placing them at the forefront of the victims. They are the targets of both the fierce repression of the regime against its own people and, now, of extremist groups. In the refugee camps, their children are often born stateless as a result of unequal citizenship laws. We must listen to these Syrian women, who remain committed to building the future of Syria, and involve them in the peace negotiations.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    In many violent situations in the Pacific region, women have demonstrated their capacity to contribute to solutions as mediators, providers of safe havens, or in working to improve local communities. Women and young women have also played an important part in conflict prevention, management and recovery in the region. Women have generally been first to actively work across ethnic divides, despite considerable risks.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    The Pacific region is working to achieve better participation in formal conflict prevention and management and post-conflict recovery efforts, as well as oversight and accountability mechanisms for the security sector. The region recognizes the value of having women at the negotiating table in leadership roles and the need to provide sufficient recognition and resources to ensure that they are able to do their work.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    As a country that hosts tens of thousands of refugees as a result of aggression and war imposed on Armenia, we attach particular importance to this debate. It is nothing new to say that the costs of conflicts are borne disproportionately by women and girls and, since it is primarily women who pay the price when peace is absent, they are important stakeholders in peacebuilding. As such, the inclusion of women in all stages of peace processes guarantees a more lasting and representative settlement.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    Armenia also commends the efforts of the newly appointed United Nations Special Envoy Mary Robinson and Special Representative of the Secretary- General Margaret Vogt and others in establishing the gender- responsive mediation practices, in particular over the past year, which saw the appointment of gender advisers, early and regular consultations with women, the establishment of women's advisory bodies, and the implementation of the commitment to secure women a place at peace talks.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    Recently, the United Nations has developed an increasingly sophisticated network for specialized gender experts for deployment to mediation, transitional justice and prosecutorial processes. Member States should avail themselves of these important resources. For example, the regular deployments of UN Women to commissions of enquiry over the past three years have produced a steady improvement in the extent to which human rights abuses against women are reported and acted upon. This is a direct result of the quality of expertise and the regular deployment of experts to those bodies.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    The participation of women in conflict resolution and mediation processes not only contributes to the elaboration of balanced rules in post-conflict situations, but is also an important factor in achieving sustainable peace. Unfortunately, there is a long way to go before women are fully and duly integrated into national and multilateral peace efforts around the world. Viewed from different points of view, such as the number of women delegates and mediators; the numbers, substance and relative importance of provisions in peace agreements; and post-conflict strategies or policies, women's participation in peace and security is still insufficient.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    Brazil believes that supporting and promoting women's participation in the maintenance of international peace and security is an increasingly important aspect of the Security Council's responsibility under the Charter. In that vein, we encourage further reflection and debates on the role of women in promoting the prevention and peaceful settlement of disputes.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    The EU Concept on Strengthening EU Mediation and Dialogue Capacities aims to promote the representation of women and the availability of adequate resources for dedicated gender expertise at an early stage of the mediation process. We call on the United Nations system to increase the participation of women in mediation activities, including as chief and lead mediators, and to include gender experts in the mediation teams. Supporting women's civil society groups is crucial to developing domestic constituencies for women's engagement in conflict resolution.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    We welcome the comprehensive approach of the report of the Secretary-General (S/2013/525) and particularly welcome the increasingly targeted and concrete recommendations for action. We underline the need for continued regular reporting and briefings to the Council. However, we note the need to further enhance the links between the information provided to the Council and the outcomes of the Council's work, particularly the mandates of the United Nations peace operations. We would also welcome reporting on the rule of law action point of the seven-point action plan on gender-sensitive peacebuilding.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    The European Union supports the work aimed at increasing the role of women in the prevention and resolution of conflicts and in peacebuilding, promoting women's equal participation in all efforts for the promotion of peace and security and providing an integrated approach to prevent and punish acts of sexual violence, as well as to bring justice, services and reparation to its victims.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    I wish to express my appreciation to you, Mr. President, for organizing today's important open debate. Your well-rounded concept note (S/2013/587, annex) is indeed very useful in providing us with the clear objective of our debate on the issue. We also express our gratitude to the Secretary-General, the High Commissioner for Human Rights, the Executive Director of UN Women and the representative of the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security, whose remarks serve as a good basis for our focus at today's meeting. The theme of the meeting is well-chosen and timely, particularly as we continue to advance the agenda to strengthen the role and engagement of women in peace processes.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    Finally, Indonesia reiterates the importance of the international community working in a concerted manner to improve women's participation during all stages of peace processes, particularly in conflict resolution, post-conflict planning and peacebuilding, including by enhancing their engagement in political and economic decision-making at the early stages of recovery processes.

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    It goes without saying that the fight against impunity can be waged only in the context of a rule of law that establishes effective transitional justice and promotes the effective participation of victims, including women, in the country's reconstruction. Unfortunately, with regard to participation, the fact is that women have played a minor role, if they have not been totally sidelined, in peace talks and reconciliation and in political and economic activities. As an illustration, in 2012 women comprised fewer than 8 per cent of the members of negotiating delegations in peace processes.

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    "Republic of the Congo. Rwanda, of course, sets the most progressive example in that respect. Togo encourages the United Nations to assist countries that have not yet done so to integrate into their national systems the experience of those who have managed to increase the role of women in peace processes and post-conflict reconstruction."

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Conflicts create situations in which women and children are the ones most affected by the deterioration of living conditions and fundamental rights. Violence and the deprivation of rights often go hand in hand with conflict. Efforts to fight impunity, provide assistance to victims and hold perpetrators accountable must be intensified and better coordinated. Regrettably, sexual and gender-based violence often continue after peace deals are reached, due to insufficient investment in protection and prevention strategies, or weak security and justice institutions. We are aware of the fact that peace cannot be sustained unless women play a critical role in the process. We therefore underscore the importance of the full and effective involvement of women at all stages of peace processes and of giving them an equal role in the prevention and resolution of conflicts, as well as in early peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Germany welcomes the detailed analysis of the Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525), which identifies many achievements in the women, peace and security agenda in the past years. We also share the concerns addressed in the report, such as an increasing focus of the international community on women as victims of armed conflict, instead of on their role as actors in peace processes and agents of change in all spheres of society.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    The signing of peace agreements and ceasefire agreements and the implementation of national action plans and programmes for the protection of women in conflict-affected countries have made it possible to identify, in a more appropriate way, the ways and means likely to promote women's rights and to strengthen their participation in efforts to prevent and resolve conflicts and in post-conflict reconstruction.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    The establishment of genuine peace requires the establishment of inclusive and durable political, economic and social structures. Within that framework, local women's entities are a driving force in empowering women and strengthening good governance. My delegation welcomes the work carried out in the framework of the United Nations system to strengthen women's capacities and involvement in mediation and peacebuilding processes. Similarly, it supports the implementation of the Secretary-General's seven-point action plan (see S/2010/466), which enables greater consideration of gender issues in peacebuilding operations.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    While it is obvious that States have the primary responsibility for ensuring that the Resolutions on Women, Peace and Security are translated into action, regional organizations working on the maintenance of international peace and security such as the OSCE, also have a recognized role. Both the recent Presidential Statement on cooperation with regional organizations, passed in August of this year by the Council, and several of the Women, Peace and Security resolutions refer to the crucial contribution of regional organizations in affirming the participation of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution mechanisms and peace-building.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    As I said, the OSCE is the world's largest regional security organization and it plays an important role throughout the region also in mediation, dialogue facilitation, good offices and quiet diplomacy. The organization has increased its efforts to ensuring that these processes are inclusive. We are pleased to announce that next week in Istanbul, on 24 October, the OSCE will launch a Guidance Note on Gender-Responsive Mediation. The purpose of the guidance note is to increase women's participation in mediation, dialogues and quiet diplomacy initiatives, but also to strengthen the capacity of mediators to understand how the substantive concerns of both men and women can be included in these processes and what the benefits of inclusivity for the sustainability of conflict resolution and reconciliation are. We are grateful to UN DPA and the Mediation Support Unit for an inspiring co-operation in the preparation of this Guidance Note.

  • Country

    Pakistan
  • Extracts

    "Given women's strong stake in peace and in how peace is negotiated, kept and consolidated, the role of women as peacemakers and peacebuilders must be integrated into the various stages of engagement, outreach and decision-making. Increased integration in pursuing the agenda on women and peace and security is useful for enhanced coordination and for avoiding duplication and the overlap of efforts and resources. However, too much integration can also carry the risk of losing the original focus on the primary objectives of that agenda. Including peripheral issues in the Council's work relating to women and peace and security would not only blur the focus but affect implementation."

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    We are convinced of the significantly positive potential of women's participation in various aspects of the settlement of armed conflict and post-conflict reconstruction. Women must not only be seen as victims

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    It is just as important to include such issues in the mandates of relevant missions. We urge States to tackle those issues not in a predetermined way, but by being mindful of individual situations. Such a differentiated approach must also be applied when giving the United Nations system instructions on how to integrate gender issues into their mandates. They have clear mandates, and for the majority of them, issues of women, peace and security are not an absolute priority but merely one of a number of factors within the framework of action aimed at preventing and resolving armed conflict and post-conflict situations. Let us not forget that the leading role in protecting women at all stages of armed conflict lies with national Governments, while measures taken by bodies of the United Nations system and by civil society must be aimed at backing and complimenting efforts made by States.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    The United Kingdom welcomes the report of the Secretary General and the important recommendations that it makes. We welcome the ongoing work of UN Women. And we recognise the continuing challenges in implementing this agenda lie beyond the topic of today's debate. In conflict settings worldwide women continue to be seen merely victims of violence rather than leaders of change, as those to be protected rather than respected and included as equal participants in all decision making processes. As Ms Mlambo- ngcuka said, women are central to leadership. Since the end of the Cold War, women have represented only 4 percent of signatories to peace agreements, less than 3 percent of mediators of peace talks, and less than 10 percent of anyone sitting at the table to negotiate on behalf of a party to conflict. Excluding 50% of society will never lead to stable and lasting peace. Peace can only be achieved with women's active participation and leadership.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Respecting and protecting women's rights and interests is not only the epitome of the civilization and progress of human society, but is also closely related to world peace and development. The international community should not only be concerned with protecting women's safety and upholding their rights and interests in conflict and post-conflict situations; it should also devote attention to ensuring that women can play their unique roles in peace processes.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Secondly, the Security Council should play its unique role fully, while strengthening its coordination and cooperation with related organizations and agencies. As the primary institution for maintaining international peace and security, the Council should focus on conflict prevention, dispute mediation and post-conflict reconstruction so as to foster an enabling political, security and rule-of-law environment for safeguarding women's security, rights and interests. The General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council, the Human Rights Council, UN Women and other United Nations agencies should discharge their respective responsibilities while working closely with one another with a view to generating synergies.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    Fortunately, as the report of the Secretary- General of 4 September (S/2013/525) acknowledges, times of transition and flux can present opportunities to strengthen women's leadership, empowerment and rights in the process of restoring the rule of law and governance systems. As his report indicates, the participation of women in peace negotiations and donor conferences has increased over the past year. Active support for such participation, which is being provided by gender experts and women's civil society organizations, is growing, and some peace agreements have included gender-sensitive language. That is encouraging. Yet the progress being made is hard fought and uneven.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    It is therefore essential that women be heard during peace processes and that they be involved in security sector and justice sector reforms. In a word, women must be full-fledged stakeholders rather than just spectators of reconstruction and peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    Particularly egregious is the practice of child, early and forced marriage, which puts the very lives of young girls at risk. That practice denies girls' rights, disrupts their access to education, severely jeopardizes their health and limits the development of their community as a whole. Conflict situations exacerbate that practice among displaced and refugee populations, such as we know to be the case in Syria. Canada encourages the Security Council to continue to provide political leadership and to take action to ensure the meaningful participation of women in conflict prevention, mediation and resolution processes.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    The need to protect women and girls must not overshadow the participation pillar of the women, peace and security agenda. My delegation is therefore pleased to see that resolution 2122 (2013), adopted earlier today, builds on the core elements of resolution 1325 (2000) and contains key commitments for several stakeholders to the full participation of women.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    Women's full participation — including in peacekeeping operations, national reconciliation processes and mediation — enhances the effectiveness and sustainability of development efforts and contributes to the prevention of conflict. But women continue to be underrepresented at all levels of decision-making. Their interests are often not, or insufficiently, reflected in peace agreements. Out of 10 peace agreements signed in 2012, only three included provisions on women and peace and security. Against that background, we welcome the Peacebuilding Commission's recent declaration on women's economic empowerment for peacebuilding. We have noted with great interest the Mediation Support Unit's commitment to increasing its efforts to include more women in mediation processes and the increased female capacity in that respect.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    We believe that it is important that the United Nations lead by example to advance this agenda. The appointment of Mary Robinson as the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for the Great Lakes Region of Africa is therefore a very important step in that respect. We welcome the Special Envoy's active engagement to involve women and ensure their participation in mediation efforts.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    Mexico welcomes the adoption of the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict, and commends the initiative taken to formulate an international protocol for investigating and documenting sexual violence in conflict. We assure the Council that we will continue to support such efforts. Similarly, we consider it vital to continue to push for women's participation in mediation processes and peace agreement and ceasefire negotiations so as to encourage national reconciliation, based on respect for and enjoyment of the human, social and civil rights of the most vulnerable groups. We believe it essential to support national reconciliation and dialogue processes with judicial change that ensures that justice is impartially meted out, and including programmes for repairing and reconstructing the social fabric.

  • Country

    Qatar
  • Extracts

    Thirteen years after the adoption of the historic resolution 1325 (2000), the culmination of a long process concerning women and international peace and security, the Security Council is still considering the issue. Our debates, however, reveal shortcomings in the area of the rights of women, which are being terribly violated, particularly in the Arab world. The Security Council has established several criteria for women's contributions to settling conflicts and their role in conflict and post-conflict situations. Those criteria should be implemented, in conformity with Security Council provisions, in order to achieve the goals of women's participation in conflict resolution and the reconstruction of society in the aftermath of conflict. Women should be integrated into peace negotiations and into social reconstruction. Their participation at every level is still incomplete. Their access to transitional justice systems must be facilitated, including in relation to crimes committed in conflict, especially since women and children are victims of particular types of crime and subject to discrimination, and they face social and cultural impediments that hinder their access to justice mechanisms.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    It is our firm belief that only through the systematic and active participation of women in peace processes can transitional justice truly assume a national dimension and lay the foundations for rebuilding the rule of law and reconciliation. We have been witnessing the very important role women can plan in reconciliation processes when they are included from the outset.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    Portugal feels particularly encouraged by the rising awareness regarding those issues, and by the efforts made at the United Nations and national levels to increase expertise in several areas, such as mediation and capacity-building for the political participation of women, whether as candidates, electoral observers or office holders.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    The report of the Secretary-General clearly notes a positive trend in women's participation in mediation processes and the negotiation of peace agreements. However, the inclusion of matters that directly affect women and their rights in such agreements is still insufficient. That is what the United Nations Working Group on the issue of discrimination against women in law and in practice points out in its latest report. The Working Group expresses concern for the fact that the gender perspective is not sufficiently taken into account in transitional processes, which will result in a less inclusive peace.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    I will conclude by quoting the words of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, who, on the occasion of an expert-level dialogue on the approach of the United Nations on transitional justice, pointed out that peace processes constitute historic opportunities for broadening the goals of post-conflict justice. Spain wants those opportunities effectively recognize women's rights, both in terms of guarantees of justice and conditions of peace.

  • Country

    Azerbaijan
  • Extracts

    It is important that Security Council member States and regional organizations ensure that mediators in the peace and preventive diplomacy process can contribute to ensuring accountability, including by encouraging the parties concerned to envisage transitional justice clauses in peace agreements. Those responsible for serious crimes committed during conflicts, including gender-based violence, must be excluded from all branches of Government, and the principle of no amnesty or any other form of indulgence for the perpetrators of such offenses must be applied. Such measures should be implemented comprehensively and should also envisage the full rights of victims to redress.

Protection
  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    This reality is, in turn, linked to achievement of all eight of the UN's Millennium Development Goals, whether directly – as in women's empowerment – or as a logical consequence – as in the areas of universal education, maternal health, child mortality, and environmental protection. Progress towards one of these essential goals will make gains easier in the others – and all are connected to women's participation in peace and security.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    The action plan provides a detailed regional framework to enhance women's and young women's leadership in conflict prevention and peacebuilding, mainstream gender and ensure the protection of women's and girls' human rights in humanitarian crises and in transitioning from conflict, disaster or post-conflict situations — all with a mechanism to accelerate the implementation of existing international, regional and national commitments on women, peace and security.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    We view this open debate as an opportunity to highlight the policies and programmes aimed at supporting national ownership and reform of justice systems that place women's rights and access to justice for women at their heart. As the recent declaration of the Peacebuilding Commission on women's economic empowerment for peacebuilding underscores, societies that invest in women see exponential dividends from such investments. We believe that justice sector reform must start with the reform of laws to ensure that women have equal rights in all spheres. It must include reforms to strengthen women's access to the justice system and to promote and protect their rights and to protect women from the violence and insecurity that too often accompany transitions from conflict.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    We also believe that without women's civil society strength and women's leadership, there will be no effective prevention. Women's experiences of violence during and after conflict are much broader, and effective protection from all forms of violence and violations will be possible only through their empowerment and participation.

  • Country

    Rwanda
  • Extracts

    "Let me also emphasize that, in our efforts to promote the women and peace and security agenda, in 2010, my country adopted a national action plan on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). To that end, we have adopted a range of policies to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls. One of the foremost priorities is to protect and rehabilitate the dignity of victims. We commend those countries that have also adopted national action plans and urge those that have not done so to make it a priority."

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    Women will not be protected in any lasting way until in-depth legal and judicial reforms are undertaken by countries emerging from armed conflict. Fortunately, a number of countries have undertaken reforms in accordance with the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and other relevant international legal instruments. Clearly, the best way to protect women and fight effectively against the effects of armed conflict on the lives of people in conflict is to take measures to prevent the outbreak of conflicts.

  • Speaker

    African Union
  • Extracts

    The African Union reaffirms its support for the advancement of holistic justice for women in situations of conflict, post-conflict, political violence and gross human rights violations. African Union documents, such as the Constitutive Act, enshrine a commitment to the advancement of gender equality and the protection of women from gender-based and other forms of violence. Furthermore, the prevention, protection and promotion of women's rights have been aptly addressed in the 2003 Protocol to the African Charter on Human and People's Rights on the Rights of Women, the 2004 Solemn Declaration on Gender Equality in Africa, and the 2009 African Union Gender Policy, which contains provisions on mainstreaming gender equality.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    With regard to the most recent report of the Secretary- General (S/2013/525), we note with satisfaction that the attention from the international community to the issue of sexual violence in conflict has increased. We therefore call upon all stakeholders to continue their efforts to reduce and eliminate the high incidence of threats faced by women and girls in contemporary armed conflicts. However, we realize that despite the urgency with which practices in implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) have improved, there remains a deficit in opportunities for women on both the national and international levels. To exercise leadership, there remains an ongoing underrepresentation of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, protection and peacebuilding processes and efforts.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Conflicts create situations in which women and children are the ones most affected by the deterioration of living conditions and fundamental rights. Violence and the deprivation of rights often go hand in hand with conflict. Efforts to fight impunity, provide assistance to victims and hold perpetrators accountable must be intensified and better coordinated. Regrettably, sexual and gender-based violence often continue after peace deals are reached, due to insufficient investment in protection and prevention strategies, or weak security and justice institutions. We are aware of the fact that peace cannot be sustained unless women play a critical role in the process. We therefore underscore the importance of the full and effective involvement of women at all stages of peace processes and of giving them an equal role in the prevention and resolution of conflicts, as well as in early peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Fourthly, women protection advisers play a central role in monitoring and reporting to the Council, training mission personnel on preventing and responding to sexual violence, and engaging in dialogue with conflict parties. Although we welcome the deployment of women protection advisers to the missions in South Sudan and Mali, the remaining women's protection advisers in the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the United Nations Operation in Côte d'Ivoire and the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur, which were already mandated by the Council, should also be deployed as rapidly as possible and, where necessary, be included in mission budgets.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    Effective and optimal empowerment of women in the context of peacebuilding and post-conflict reconstruction involves the collective and coordinated action of the international community and the United Nations system, through strengthening protection and prevention measures adapted to specific contexts that will facilitate the implementation of the resolution.

  • Country

    Pakistan
  • Extracts

    "The rule of law is one of the key elements in the promotion of the agenda on women and peace and security. Gender-responsive transitional justice and reform of the justice and security sectors are prerequisites for promoting and protecting women's rights in conflict and post-conflict situations. The rule of law and transitional justice should continue to be developed so as to protect the rights of women in such situations. The emphasis should be on addressing the root causes of conflicts. Chronic conflicts and relapses into conflict blight some societies, countries and regions and keep them in a state of perpetual instability. The resolution of conflicts is, therefore, the best way to promote and protect the rights and interests of women in conflict situations. We must harness all our resources to prevent and resolve conflicts."

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    For over a decade now, resolution 1325 (2000) has clearly confirmed its vital role and importance in strengthening the role of women in the prevention and settlement of armed conflicts and during post- conflict reconstruction, as well as in their protection during such conflicts. Unfortunately, despite numerous efforts, women continue to fall victim to various forms of violence. That is why we believe that more attention needs to be given to all categories of such crimes. Such a balanced approach is enshrined in resolution 1325 (2000). Cases of women and children being killed and getting injured are a cause for serious concern, including as a result of the indiscriminate or excessive use of force. We think it is unacceptable to simply turn a blind eye to such crimes or to justify them as so-called inevitable acts of collateral damage, which contradicts provisions in the Geneva Conventions.

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    It is just as important to include such issues in the mandates of relevant missions. We urge States to tackle those issues not in a predetermined way, but by being mindful of individual situations. Such a differentiated approach must also be applied when giving the United Nations system instructions on how to integrate gender issues into their mandates. They have clear mandates, and for the majority of them, issues of women, peace and security are not an absolute priority but merely one of a number of factors within the framework of action aimed at preventing and resolving armed conflict and post-conflict situations. Let us not forget that the leading role in protecting women at all stages of armed conflict lies with national Governments, while measures taken by bodies of the United Nations system and by civil society must be aimed at backing and complimenting efforts made by States.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    As the Secretary-General has highlighted, women's representation in the justice sector is crucial and helps increase the reporting of crimes. Barriers must be removed so that women can access justice in formal and traditional settings. For example, we have seen success through the use of mobile courts in the Democratic Republic of Congo and paralegal support groups in Nepal. In addition, the most basic needs must be provided for, from access to safe public transportation to the effective delivery of services like water and electricity, as Ms Balipou so eloquently highlighted in her statement earlier.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    In order to realize a more peaceful society, Japan intends to make its utmost effort to ensure women's participation and incorporate a women's perspective into each and every phase of conflict prevention, conflict settlement and peacebuilding, including election processes. Such women's participation will also contribute to better protecting the rights and the physical well-being of women, including female human rights defenders, female political leaders and female war correspondents, who are particularly exposed to danger in times of conflict.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    Malaysia welcomes today's adoption of the resolution 2122 (2013) on the issue discussed. My delegation hopes that there will be sufficient impetus toward the actual realization of the resolution and the landmark resolution 1325 (2000). Malaysia therefore appreciates the ongoing update on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in the Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525) of 4 September. As mentioned in the report, there remains a deficit in opportunities for women to exercise leadership, and women are still underrepresented in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, protection and peacebuilding processes. My delegation believes that the greater active participation of women in peacekeeping and peacebuilding would go a long way towards including a gender perspective and allowing women to shape peace.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    In that regard, there is a need to increase the number of women in high-level decision-making positions in peacekeeping and peacebuilding operations. Malaysia is also supportive of appointing more women protection advisers to monitor and report on sexual violence in all relevant situations. We appreciate the positive values they bring in creating greater awareness of sexual violence issues, reporting incidents of sexual violence and implementing Security Council resolutions on the ground.

  • Country

    Thailand
  • Extracts

    My delegation is pleased to learn from UN Women that transitional justice mechanisms are increasingly responding to war crimes against women by providing specific arrangements to protect women witnesses. We also welcome the adoption of resolution 2106 (2013), in June, which focuses on accountability for perpetrators of sexual violence in conflict and stresses women's political and economic empowerment. Those mechanisms need to be effectively utilized. The Council's resolutions and presidential statements also need to be translated into actions if we are to be successful in our attempt to protect women.

  • Country

    Thailand
  • Extracts

    Although we do not have a situation of armed conflict in Thailand, the Security Council resolutions on women, peace and security have been applied as domestic guidelines on how to best protect women in our country. A Subcommittee on Women and the Promotion of Peace and Security has been established by the Ministry of Social Development and Human Security. The Subcommittee is currently drafting policies and strategies as a basis for our national action plan, which hopefully will be adopted in the near future.

  • Country

    Qatar
  • Extracts

    We cannot talk about women and peace and security without discussing the causes of their vulnerability. There are several aspects of this that should be strengthened, first and foremost through laws that protect women in conflict without discrimination. We should call on all parties concerned to take measures to protect women and girls against gender-based and sexual violence in times of conflict.

  • Country

    Syria
  • Extracts

    We hope that Ms. Phumzile Mlambo-Ngucuka will actively seek to put an end to that phenomenon and that she will pressure those foreign Powers that seek to intensify the bloodshed in Syria to cease their interference in my country and their violations of international law and the United Nations charter. We also look forward to her active participation in protecting the rights of Syrian women under the Israeli occupation in the occupied Golan Heights and in improving their living conditions.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    Let me conclude by stressing the role of the economic, social and cultural rights of women as a central component of protection. Portugal strongly supports the inclusion of this subject in the Secretary- General's latest report (S/2013/525). These issues belong at the forefront of our discussions on women and peace and security and we commend his effort to do so. Further analysis of the relationship between the stability of livelihoods and the safety of women and girls is therefore, from our point of view, crucial. We encourage the United Nations to continue to give it due attention.

  • Country

    Azerbaijan
  • Extracts

    Governments bear the primary responsibility for the protection of civilians and for ensuring accountability for conflict-related criminal offenses. In resolution 2122 (2013), adopted today, the Security Council once again calls on Member States to comply with their relevant obligations to end impunity and to thoroughly investigate and prosecute persons responsible for genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity and other serious violations of international humanitarian law. At the same time, when national authorities fail to take action, the international community should play a more proactive role in ensuring an appropriate response. Such measures and appropriate protection and accountability efforts must obviously be free of selectively and politically motivated approaches and preferences. It is essential to address conflict-related violations and abuses of human rights through all available means, including, inter alia, by mandating international commissions of inquiry and fact-finding missions, as well as by supporting the implementation of the recommendations of those bodies and missions.

  • Country

    Czech Rep.
  • Extracts

    As part of its human rights promotion activities, the Czech Republic takes into consideration gender aspects and the protection of women in post-conflict situations, as well as in countries in transition, including by supporting projects of Czech and local non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Since 2005, the transition promotion programme of the Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs — a unique financial instrument aimed at democracy assistance — has supported projects of civil society organizations that are working to strengthen democracy, the rule of law and respect for human rights by empowering civil society, including women's organizations, throughout the world.

Sexual and Gender-Based Violence
  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    This past year, as we've heard, women were included in every formal peace negotiating process led or co- led by the UN. Gender experts were present in eighty-five percent of delegations and, in each case, representatives of women's civil society groups were consulted. Women are playing a more prominent role in crisis prevention, most notably in Darfur and the Great Lakes Region. Since 2009, gender crimes investigators have been a part of all UN commissions of inquiry. And again as was said, this year 3 out of 10 peace agreements in UN supported processes included provisions for women's political participation or protection. That is more than the year before. Analysis of women and security is now included in most reports by peacekeeping and special political missions. And the Secretary General has established – and my government and other governments vigorously support – the policy of zero tolerance toward sexual- related abuses committed by UN personnel, something that still happens with alarming incidence.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    Moreover, we have all deplored the horrific sexual crimes being carried out daily in Syria where rape has again become a routine weapon of war. And this Council is just back from Eastern Congo where we met with IDPs, peacekeepers, and civil society, who described a near pandemic of sexual violence associated with the conflict there.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Strengthening international and national justice responses to conflict-related violence against women is crucial. In the aftermath of conflict, it is vital to develop transitional justice mechanisms and institutions and to rebuild the rule of law to protect women's rights.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    In recent years, the United Nations has augmented its involvement in establishing and supporting transitional justice measures, furthering women's rights in post- conflict societies. The United Nations-supported truth commissions in Mali, Kenya and Cote d'Ivoire have addressed gender-based crimes. Yet more must be done to ensure that transitional justice addresses a full range of gender-specific crimes, including human trafficking, early or forced marriages, the links between sexual violence and natural-resource extraction, withholding humanitarian assistance, enforced disappearances and forced displacement.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Transitional justice cannot be a substitute for accountability. It should not limit the access of victims to reparations. Blanket amnesties cannot be extended to conflict-related sexual violence. We must pay greater attention to delivering reparation programmes and funding. We continue to support the wider Council practice of including sexual violence in the designation criteria for targeted sanctions.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Lithuania sponsored Council resolution 2117 (2013), on small arms and light weapons, which links the illicit transfer and misuse of small arms to a disproportionate impact on violence against women and girls.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    We firmly believe that capacity-building should be a main focus of United Nations efforts. In order to ensure sustainable peace and stability, State institutions, including in the area of security, the rule of law and justice, need to be strengthened. National Governments have the primary responsibility for prosecuting and deterring violence against women, including sexual violence. As affected States re-embark on the process of rebuilding their countries, including by consolidating democratic ideals and practices and making effective improvements to socioeconomic conditions, the United Nations and the international community must step up and sustain their support to them.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    We would urge caution in going beyond the mandates given by the Security Council in the reports submitted to it. It will be useful to remind ourselves that the women, peace and security agenda evolved from the imperative to address the disproportionate impact of armed conflict on women, including the abhorrent practice of sexual violence against women as an instrument of war.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    We firmly believe that capacity-building should be a main focus of United Nations efforts. In order to ensure sustainable peace and stability, State institutions, including in the area of security, the rule of law and justice, need to be strengthened. National Governments have the primary responsibility for prosecuting and deterring violence against women, including sexual violence. As affected States re-embark on the process of rebuilding their countries, including by consolidating democratic ideals and practices and making effective improvements to socioeconomic conditions, the United Nations and the international community must step up and sustain their support to them.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    We would urge caution in going beyond the mandates given by the Security Council in the reports submitted to it. It will be useful to remind ourselves that the women, peace and security agenda evolved from the imperative to address the disproportionate impact of armed conflict on women, including the abhorrent practice of sexual violence against women as an instrument of war.

  • Speaker

    NATO
  • Extracts

    The heinous crimes, and in particular the sexual and gender-based violence, committed during conflicts have amplified the need to stand united in the struggle against impunity. Sexual and gender-based violence in conflict undermines freedom, security and stability, and, if unpunished, it undermines the credibility of any legal system, denying access to justice for all. Global prosecutions, civilian protection mechanisms, the contributions of the United Nations and other international organizations are there to complement national efforts.

  • Speaker

    NATO
  • Extracts

    In September, all NATO allies fully subscribed to the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict. It is highlighted, both in that Declaration and in resolution 2106 (2013), that the collection of data and the documentation of sexual and gender-based violence in armed conflict can be instrumental in bringing perpetrators to justice and in ensuring justice for survivors.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Justice for victims of serious violations of international law is an essential requirement for sustainable peace, security and the development for States emerging from armed conflict, where the rule of law must enjoy primacy and be unscrupulously upheld. My delegation therefore supports efforts by the Council to continue fighting impunity for the most serious crimes committed against women and girls, through the work of the International Criminal Court, ad hoc and mixed tribunals, as well as specialized chambers in national tribunals.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    I would like to commend the United Nations team of experts on the rule of law and sexual violence for their valuable work.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    Sexual violence in armed conflicts, from the early stages of conflict to its aftermath, is one of the gravest human rights abuses committed against women and girls. In situations of conflict, sexual violence is often used as a weapon of war — a strategy to deprive human beings of their most basic rights, their safety, security and dignity. Sexual violence can exacerbate and prolong armed conflicts and may impede the restoration of international peace and security, as posited in many relevant Security Council resolutions to date.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    We welcome the fact that the international community has been paying increasing attention to the crime of sexual violence in conflict. The Security Council has hosted many debates on the issue and addressed the crucial issues of transitional justice, capacity-building and the rule of law. International and regional organizations are devoting more attention to thistopic.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    However, despite all those efforts, sexual violence in armed conflict remains one of the most neglected crimes. Sadly, the situation in Syria, just across our border, is a vivid example of that. Turkey echoes the condemnation voiced very recently by the Council of the acts of sexual and gender-based violence and abuse taking place in Syria. However, as we most regretfully know, a culture of impunity tends to prevail in conflicts and in post- conflict situations. Violators are not adequately punished, if punished at all. Victims lack sufficient access to justice, physical and psychological treatment or support. Those suffering sexual violence often find it difficult to speak out, especially in situations of prolonged conflict.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    Today's debate serves to highlight the strong will power of the international community to combat sexual violence in conflict. Now is time to focus on the ways and means to do so by sharing best practices and talking about specific measures that can be adopted. In that sense, we find the focus of today's debate on the rule of law and transitional justice in conflict and post-conflict situations extremely useful, and would like to thank the Azerbaijani presidency for convening it.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    The elimination of the root causes of conflict is the best way to prevent sexual violence and to address impunity. Combating impunity is possible only by building transparent, effective, non-discriminatory and functioning institutions and justice systems. It is vital to ensure that women and girls have access to judicial institutions and proper representation. We in the international community should pursue our efforts to support gender-sensitive judicial reform and capacity- building. It is important to provide gender expertise in peacekeeping operations and peacebuilding efforts, as well as to ensure the participation of women in those efforts.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    The health sector is another area that should be strengthened to deal with sexual violence in armed conflict. Rehabilitation to address the mental, physical and psychological trauma suffered by women and girls should not be delayed, so that they can move on and rebuild their lives.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    Combating sexual violence is an issue that should also be dealt with on a broader societal scale. As individuals and groups from all sectors of society raise their voices higher against this atrocity, we will all be able to stand stronger in our struggle. That requires a need for stronger interaction with civil society, grass- roots institutions and women's organizations, as well as the private sector and the media.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, I would like to thank the Security Council, member States and all relevant United Nations bodies, in addition to all relevant stakeholders at the local, national, regional and global levels that have made the issue of sexual violence against women in conflict a priority.

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    Argentina would like to emhasize the need for a gender perspective and for crimes against women to be incorporated into the agenda of peace negotiations. To that end, we need women in decision-making positions and at all stages of the peace process. We know that women are victims of widespread violence at the hands of all parties involved in a conflict. We also know that sexual violence in conflict is not a new phenomenon, rather it is a powerful weapon used to destroy not merely the life of a woman but also to destroy families, communities, ethnic groups or entire nations.

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    Although we still hear that violence is as old as war itself and that women's bodies have been a battlefield for centuries throughout the world, the experience in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Rwanda served to scuttle the cynical acceptance of sexual violence as a natural phenomenon in armed conflicts, and of rape as a weapon of war of devastating power. The atrocities documented at the time and the survivors' testimonies of massive violations — rapes in camps, mutilations, sexual slavery and forced pregnancies — moved humankind's ethical consciousness, while sexual violence in armed conflicts seized being an invisible crime or an immutable tradition. The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the Special Court for Sierra Leone decisively made progress in classifying sexual violence, in particular rape in conflict situations, as torture, a war crime and a crime against humanity. With complete clarity, the International Criminal Court Statute would subsequently establish that acts of rape, sexual slavery, prostitution, forced pregnancy or sterilization or any other form of sexual violence of comparable severity constitute war crimes and crimes against humanity.

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    "It is true that much remains to be done. Despite all the progress made — as we recently noted in our visit to the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Great Lakes region — weak States, authoritarian Governments, corrupt systems and a widespread culture of impunity serve to perpetuate inequality and violence against women in conf lict and post-conf lict situations, and that enables other types of inequality, discrimination and violence to exist in society. We have worked very hard to put an end to rape as a weapon of war and to the wrongful response of impunity for its perpetrators. While those efforts have contributed to reducing impunity's
    negative effects, we are aware that the problem has still not been eradicated."

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    Finally, I would like to share the sentiments expressed in 2012 by a group of women Nobel Peace Prize laureates — Jody Williams, Shirin Ebadi, Mairead Maguire and Leymah Gbowee — that a world without war and violence against women is possible and that “[o]ur collective efforts have brought gender violence to the forefront of policy and public discussions. Now, our united actions will stop rape in conflict”.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    Of the over 2 million refugees from Syria today, 78 per cent are women and girls. Having fled the violence in Syria, they are attempting to navigate a tidal wave of new threats – sexual violence, mass forced displacement, early and forced marriage, forced pregnancies and exploitation. These circumstances must not prevent their vital contribution to reconstructing a safe and functioning Syrian society, and we must ensure that their leadership is harnessed as part of the solution.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    Local justice remains critical to the long-term healing and the reconciliation of communities, and affected States need to ensure accountability for conflict-related crimes. But to be effective, this must include justice for crimes of sexual violence. Fifteen years since the Rome Statute included sexual and gender- based offences as crimes against humanity and war crimes the inclusion of such offences in transitional justice arrangements must be mainstreamed. From prosecutions, to truth commissions, to reparations programs, effective transitional justice mechanisms must incorporate the situation of women.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    Of course, ensuring women and girls' safety and security in conflict is instrumental to laying the ground for gender equality initiatives. We look forward to the contribution that implementation of the Arms Trade Treaty can make to reducing gender-based violence in conflict settings, and we strongly encourage its ratification.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    While our country has periodically taken part in these debates, our comments today are special significance since this is our first speech following Chile's election as a non-permanent member of the Council for the period 2014-2015. We reiterate our commitment to the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) (2000), bearing in mind that 2015 will mark the fifteenth anniversary of that instrument, which has enabled us to progress, among other goals, in the promotion of women to positions of leadership, the prevention of gender-based violence in situations of conflict and post-conflict, and the creation of national plans in various countries, including Chile.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    Chile signed the Arms Trade Treaty and urges other States to support that initiative, which we believe represents an important humanitarian instrument for the prevention of violence against women and girls.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    First, that is obvious to the Council, which in two-thirds of its resolutions makes references to the women, peace and security agenda. It also obvious to the United Nations, where the presence of women in mediation teams and field missions increases year after year, although efforts still need to be made regarding management positions. In that regard, I welcome the work of UN Women and its activities to strengthen the coherence of and coordinate efforts to promote women within the United Nations. We also welcome the zero- tolerance policy for United Nations personnel that is being implemented by the Secretary-General, and which has proven to be useful and should continue.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    That and other crises demonstrate the urgent need to act. This morning, we heard an eye-witness account on the Central African Republic. We have heard that the situation is tragic, encompassing sexual violence, forced disappearances, recruitment of child soldiers and, increasingly, religiously motivated violence. The precarious situation of women is shocking. The Council should remain apprised of the issue. Not only must we take the situation of women into account; beyond that, to the extent that the tragic situation of women in the Central African Republic is only part of the broader tragedy of the entire country, we must re-establish security, peace and the rule of law there. France voted in favour of resolution 2118 (2013) in that regard and will stay the course, including, if necessary, by proposing a peacekeeping operation in that country.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    In that regard, I call the Council's attention to the letter by the representative of the Syrian National Coalition, which provides a very good description of the sufferings that the Al-Assad regime is inflicting on Syrian women. Those violent acts, I remind members, were reported by the Human Rights Council's Commission of Inquiry.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    Despite some positive steps, including the number of women serving in important and very senior Government positions, women's parliamentary representation in the Pacific is the lowest of any region in the world. The region has recently witnessed and continues to be affected by armed conflict, civil unrest and local-level conflicts over resources, as well as increasingly violent crimes and political crises. Women and children constitute a disproportionate number of those affected. Women face a variety of security challenges in the Pacific, including water and food security, loss of land, violence, and economic empowerment. A range of potential drivers is apparent, rangining from economic inequalities, land, governance, alienated youth, urban migration and inter-group tensions, with results that inevitably disrupt the lives of women and their families and increase the risk of sexual and gender-based violence.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    More recently, the Forum leaders have recognized climate change as the greatest threat to the livelihood and well-being of the peoples of the Pacific. Climate impacts can lead to forced displacement, with clear implications for women, and raise security questions that have no simple solutions or easy precedents. In times of natural disaster, which are increasing in the Pacific region, women and girls are more prone to sexual violence in the context of displacement due to the loss of their homes or traditional protection mechanisms though their family or clan structures.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    We also believe that without women's civil society strength and women's leadership, there will be no effective prevention. Women's experiences of violence during and after conflict are much broader, and effective protection from all forms of violence and violations will be possible only through their empowerment and participation.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    The scourge of sexual violence in armed conflict has rightly been the subject of attention by the Council. It is warranted that we also focus on the importance of furthering the equal rights of women and their right to equal participation in decision-making processes.

  • Country

    Egypt
  • Extracts

    Egypt has considered with interest the Secretary- General's report on women and peace and security (S/2013/525). We would like to express our appreciation for the efforts made in the drafting of the report, which highlights the progress made, including the significant policy and operational focus on the monitoring, prevention and prosecution of violence against women in conflicts. In that context, I would like to make the following remarks.

  • Country

    Egypt
  • Extracts

    Secondly, Egypt is deeply concerned about the increasing rates and patterns of violence against women and girls around the world, particularly sexual violence in armed conflicts and post-conflict situations. We stress the indispensable role of transitional justice and the rule of the law for the protection of women's rights and for ensuring accountability and non-impunity for perpetrators, as a key element of conflict-prevention, peacekeeping, conflict-resolution and peacebuilding. Transitional justice measures must address the full range of violations and abuses of women's human rights, including crimes committed by United Nations peacekeeping forces and personnel.

  • Country

    Egypt
  • Extracts

    In that context, we highlight the significance of the initiative taken in April by the Group of Eight on preventing sexual violence in conflict, assisting victims of sexual violence in war and preventing further peacekeeping forces and personnel.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    We note positively the Council's growing practice of including sexual and gender based violence in the designation criteria for targeted sanctions regimes.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    The European Union supports the work aimed at increasing the role of women in the prevention and resolution of conflicts and in peacebuilding, promoting women's equal participation in all efforts for the promotion of peace and security and providing an integrated approach to prevent and punish acts of sexual violence, as well as to bring justice, services and reparation to its victims.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    We commend the work of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, Ms. Zainab Hawa Bangura, and of the Team of Experts on the Rule of Law.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    As stated in the Secretary-General's report on women's participation in peacebuilding (S/2010/466), it is essential to improve the approach of the United Nations in combating sexual and gender-based violence, particularly through the training for United Nations peacekeepers. In the context of peacekeeping, the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and other related resolutions has paved the way for a gender perspective mechanism in United Nations peacekeeping operations. Increasing the number of female peacekeepers on the ground would also be a positive step in support of resolution 1325 (2000). On our part, we are happy to point out that Indonesia has deployed female peacekeepers as well as military and police observers in several missions, including the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon, the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur, the United Nations Mission in South Sudan and the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    Hard tools, such as sanctions regimes that target perpetrators of sexual violence and appropriately mandated and trained peacekeeping missions, are effective instruments for the protection agenda, but the participation dimension of the women and peace and security agenda still requires targeted action by the Council. Indeed, the Council's role in addressing women's political participation in the peace and security agenda remains a challenge. That makes today's debate on the role of women in transitional justice even more important.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    Beyond simply being a just democratic principle, there are many tangible reasons for that. It builds trust in post-conflict justice institutions, and UN Women's research shows that women are more likely to report sexual and gender-based crimes to transitional justice institutions that involve women judges and officials. The Council should also make clear that there must be prominent roles for women, both as leaders and as active participants in the consultative processes that establish transitional arrangements.

  • Country

    Rwanda
  • Extracts

    At the outset, the Government of Rwanda once again condemns all forms of violence against women and girls worldwide, especially in conflict and post- conflict zones. As previously stated in the Council, we believe that sexual violence in conflict should be qualified as sexual terrorism.

  • Country

    Rwanda
  • Extracts

    At the institutional level, Rwanda's security organs, in collaboration with other Government agencies, local communities and civil society, have launched initiatives to prevent and respond to violence that targets women and girls. The one-stop centres run by the national police offer a wide range of free services for victims of gender-based violence, and we have set up gender desks in police stations and army posts nationwide, and at the national prosecution agency, for the purposes of offering gender-sensitive services to victims.

  • Country

    Rwanda
  • Extracts

    "At the continental level, Rwanda is among the leading the police-contributing countries, with female police and correctional officers serving in the United Nations peacebuilding and peacekeeping missions in Liberia, Haiti, the Sudan, Côte d'Ivoire and Chad. Those officers actively contribute to combating and raising awareness on violence against women in the communities they serve. They also serve as advisers on gender-based violence and share best practices with other officers and local authorities."

  • Country

    Rwanda
  • Extracts

    Let me also express my delegation's support for the principle of zero tolerance advocated by the United Nations and call for the principle to be more rigorously enforced. During the 1994 genocide perpetrated against the Tutsi in Rwanda, women and girls were forced to endure inhuman and degrading atrocities. Tens of thousands were raped and left for dead. That memory — that history — inspires Rwanda in its unyielding and heartfelt commitment to fight against impunity, especially when it comes to crimes against women and girls.

  • Country

    Rwanda
  • Extracts

    Rwandans have come to understand first hand the importance of strengthening internal justice mechanisms and building institutions that enhance accessibility to justice. We believe that the fight against impunity is primarily the responsibility of States. The international community, including the United Nations, should support national jurisdictions and help them to build capacity where gaps exist, by providing guidance and direction drawn from best practices in the field. That is not to suggest, however, that those international justice mechanisms are irrelevant; indeed, a political international mechanism or tribunal could complement the work of national jurisdictions in the fight against impunity and bring perpetrators of crimes against humanity and genocide, including crimes against women and girls, to justice.

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    The adoption by the Security Council of resolution 1325 (2000) and its subsequent resolutions demonstrates the Council's continuous concern at the violence against women in conflict and post-conflict situations. An assessment of the implementation of those resolutions shows that, while they have contributed to promoting gender equality in prevention, participation, protection, peacebuilding and restoring the rule of law, as noted in the report of the Secretary-General before us today (S/2013/525), much remains to be done. The goal of the United Nations in those resolutions is essentially that of freeing women and girls from acts of violence of all kinds and giving them the place that they deserve in society — a goal that has yet to be reached.

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    "The events unfolding in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, in the Central African Republic — as Ms. Balipou mentioned — in Syria and elsewhere around the world, where women continue to be the special target of violence committed by men, show that there is still a long way to go to protect women in situations of armed conflict. Togo nonetheless welcomes the fact that the United Nations, through its peacekeeping operations, has made the protection of civilians an essential element in the mandates of peace missions. The deployment on the ground of gender advisers arises from that determination to help the victims and guide them to the appropriate support services. My country would like to see the deployment of such advisers mainstreamed throughout all missions, with the staffing and resources that they need."

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    As we all know, violence against women will not end until those who commit and order it are found, arrested, tried and sentenced. The fight against impunity cannot be a matter of mere words; it must see be a commitment by all political actors and parties in a crisis to work to eradicate the culture of violence against women and girls, especially rape, which has for some time been a weapon of war.

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    My delegation welcomes the fact that resolution 2122 (2013), which was adopted earlier today, focuses on various aspects of the fight against violence against women. We hope that it will have a positive impact on the ground, in particular through its implementation by all countries.

  • Speaker

    African Union
  • Extracts

    The African Union reaffirms its support for the advancement of holistic justice for women in situations of conflict, post-conflict, political violence and gross human rights violations. African Union documents, such as the Constitutive Act, enshrine a commitment to the advancement of gender equality and the protection of women from gender-based and other forms of violence. Furthermore, the prevention, protection and promotion of women's rights have been aptly addressed in the 2003 Protocol to the African Charter on Human and People's Rights on the Rights of Women, the 2004 Solemn Declaration on Gender Equality in Africa, and the 2009 African Union Gender Policy, which contains provisions on mainstreaming gender equality.

  • Speaker

    African Union
  • Extracts

    The African Union takes cognizance of its member States' international commitments in respect of women's rights, most notably Security Council resolutions on women, peace and security, and thus acknowledges and supports the efforts of those African States and regional bodies that have taken concrete steps towards implementing those resolutions. Some notable examples are Liberia, which has developed an action plan and indicators for implementing resolution 1325 (2000), and the International Conference of the Great Lakes Region, which is in the process of developing a regional protocol on sexual and gender-based violence.

  • Speaker

    African Union
  • Extracts

    Despite those notable advances, much more remains to be done on the continent to ensure that justice and accountability for violations, particularly against women, are brought to bear and that redress for the victims is provided in order to ensure that crimes perpetrated against them during conflicts are never repeated.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    Austria appreciates the Security Council's increased attention to violence against journalists in situations of armed conflict. As the Secretary-General's report rightly points out, female journalists often face gender-specific risks of violence and intimidation. Our initiative on the safety of journalists in the Human Rights Council acknowledges those specific risks and calls for a gender-sensitive approach when considering measures to address the safety of journalists.

  • Country

    Belgium
  • Extracts

    Belgium continues to give political and operational priority to the fight against all forms of violence against civilians during and after armed conflict, with particular focus on sexual violence. In that regard, my country encourages States to include the fight against sexual violence in their transitional justice mechanisms and penal law, and to consider the fight against sexual violence as their responsibility. We also reiterate our call on all countries to apply the broadest possible definition of the concept of sexual violence, as identified by the International Criminal Court.

  • Country

    Belgium
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, I take this opportunity to welcome the publication by the Democratic Republic of the Congo of a report on sexual violence in that country. The report demonstrates the importance of the Human Rights Council's decision to convene at its twenty- fifth session a high-level dialogue on the lessons learned and the remaining challenges in the campaign against sexual violence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The report also reflects the need to allow countries in conflict and post-conflict situations to share their relevant experience.

  • Country

    Belgium
  • Extracts

    Regarding accountability and the fight against impunity, the international community's efforts in that field should be recalled. That was highlighted during the Council debate of 24 June 2013 on impunity for crimes of sexual violence in conflicts (S/PV.6984) and the subsequent adoption of resolution 2106 (2013), which reiterates the importance of vigorously continuing to establish accountability for the most serious crimes committed against women and girls in conflict. On that issue, I would like to stress the need to address impunity for crimes committed against those who tend to be particularly discriminated against, such as women and girls with disabilities or indigenous women and girls.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    We believe that the Security Council, UN Women and the Special Representative of the Secretary- General on Sexual Violence in Conflict will ensure that the United Nations works in a concerted and coordinated manner that will strengthen the capacity of the United Nations system to match its commitment to gender equality with the leadership, resources and expertise needed to advance achievements on the ground. The development of additional indicators to track the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) is a significant step in broadening the women and peace and security agenda.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    With regard to the most recent report of the Secretary- General (S/2013/525), we note with satisfaction that the attention from the international community to the issue of sexual violence in conflict has increased. We therefore call upon all stakeholders to continue their efforts to reduce and eliminate the high incidence of threats faced by women and girls in contemporary armed conflicts. However, we realize that despite the urgency with which practices in implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) have improved, there remains a deficit in opportunities for women on both the national and international levels. To exercise leadership, there remains an ongoing underrepresentation of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, protection and peacebuilding processes and efforts.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Conflicts create situations in which women and children are the ones most affected by the deterioration of living conditions and fundamental rights. Violence and the deprivation of rights often go hand in hand with conflict. Efforts to fight impunity, provide assistance to victims and hold perpetrators accountable must be intensified and better coordinated. Regrettably, sexual and gender-based violence often continue after peace deals are reached, due to insufficient investment in protection and prevention strategies, or weak security and justice institutions. We are aware of the fact that peace cannot be sustained unless women play a critical role in the process. We therefore underscore the importance of the full and effective involvement of women at all stages of peace processes and of giving them an equal role in the prevention and resolution of conflicts, as well as in early peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    We affirm our commitment to the rule of law as an imperative for political dialogue and cooperation. In that regard, with the aim of improving the overall situation of women victims of rape, we are making efforts to finalize the drafting of a programme for victims of rape, sexual abuse and torture in Bosnia and Herzegovina for the period 2013-2016. At the State level, a draft transitional justice strategy has been developed to create an acceptable platform for efficient and realistic mechanisms and activities to correct the injustices and heal the traumas resulting from the armed conflict in the 1990s.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    Additionally, as stated in the Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525), women's representation in the justice sector plays a significant role in increasing the reporting of crimes and enhancing public trust in the rule of law institutions. The importance of prevention must likewise be stressed. By enabling women to fully participate in judicial systems, we can better tackle the root causes of impunity for violence against women.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    Estonia was honoured to join the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict during the General Assembly's opening week. We were also glad to see how much interest there was in the topic of enhancing accountability for sexual violence in conflict, discussed at a side event during that week that focused on the role of the ICC and that was hosted by the Estonian Mission to the United Nations. We would like to commend the important work of the Team of Experts on Rule of Law and Sexual Violence in Conflict, and I am glad to note that Estonia has made financial contributions to the activities of the Team.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    Estonia would also like to take the opportunity to emphasize that in addition to conflict-related sexual violence, increased attention should be paid to the full range of violations and serious crimes experienced by women, including gendered impacts of enforced disappearances, foreign occupation, mass forced displacement, restrictions on humanitarian aid, conflict-related trafficking and the destruction of civilian infrastructure.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, we are glad to note that Estonia was among the sponsors of resolution 2106 (2013), which strengthens the monitoring and prevention of sexual violence in conflict, and we were happy to co-sponsor resolution 2122 (2013), adopted today.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Transitional justice and the rule of law are crucial elements for the prevention and solution of conflicts. We therefore very much welcome the theme of today's debate, which emphasizes the importance of gender- sensitive systems. Women need to be part of all truth and justice commissions, and women's concerns need to be addressed in those fact-finding bodies. At the same time, perpetrators of violence, crimes and human rights violations need to be held accountable for their actions. That is the most promising way to promote lasting reconciliation. Germany has supported several projects in Rwanda and Burundi to train female police officers on the prevention and investigation of sexual and gender-based violence. In Cambodia and Uganda, Germany has supported the access of women to the justice system through legal and psychosocial counseling.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Thirdly, the Security Council, for its part, should start to systematically mainstream women's issues in all relevant spheres of its work. Whenever the Security Council mandates or renews United Nations missions or requests briefings from envoys and special representatives, women, peace and security should be a central part of all considerations. We welcome that the resolution adopted today contains provisions addressing that.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Fourthly, women protection advisers play a central role in monitoring and reporting to the Council, training mission personnel on preventing and responding to sexual violence, and engaging in dialogue with conflict parties. Although we welcome the deployment of women protection advisers to the missions in South Sudan and Mali, the remaining women's protection advisers in the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the United Nations Operation in Côte d'Ivoire and the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur, which were already mandated by the Council, should also be deployed as rapidly as possible and, where necessary, be included in mission budgets.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    In a conflict-affected environment, violence against women is significantly intensified, indicating that in many cases, violence is an extension of existing gender inequality in society. Despite the continuous efforts of the international community to eradicate violence against women, sexual violence in armed conflicts remains a widespread phenomenon. It exacerbates and prolongs situations of armed conflict and is therefore directly linked to the maintenance of peace and security.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    Prevention, rather than reaction, must be a priority. That requires the existence of early warning mechanisms based on accurate, objective and reliable information. The collection of data relating to sexual violence in areas of conflict is crucial and strongly encouraged, so that both national and international actors may be duly informed.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    While it is crucial to address sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict contexts, it is equally important to combat impunity and strengthen both international and national justice responses to those crimes. Consequently, capacity-building related to the rule of law, that is wide in scope and goes beyond traditional areas of law reform and strengthening of justice and law enforcement institutions are necessary.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    The rule of law should address justice, equality and equity with a strong focus on the empowerment of women and girls, gender equality, and preventing and combating violence against women as essential preconditions for equitable and inclusive sustainable development. In that context, we praise the work of the United Nations in assisting Member States to address rule of law issues in conflict contexts and we consider it vital that the United Nations continues to emphasize the importance of providing redress and assistance to victims in conflict, post-conflict and other crisis situations.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    The prevention of and response to violence against children, in particular, including sexual violence and abuse, forced marriage and maltreatment, should continue to be an important focus area of United Nations assistance.

  • Country

    Guatemala
  • Extracts

    Finally, we believe that the fifteenth anniversary of the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), in 2015, will provide not only the Security Council but the entire United Nations system an opportunity to review the levels of implementation of that resolution and to renew commitments to combat violence, including sexual violence. We urge all Member States and the United Nations system to facilitate greater participation by women in that area.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    To take just one example: the OSCE promotes gender balance in its work with judicial personnel because we believe that diversity has a positive impact on women's access to justice and the perceived legitimacy of the judiciary. From a substantive perspective our Mission to Bosnia and Herzegovina supports the integration of a gender perspective into war crimes trial monitoring by providing specific training for civil society on how to monitor conflict-related sexual violence cases and understand the specific challenges that witnesses and victims face in these processes. Trial monitors are then better prepared to gather data on how these cases progress through the judicial system and to advocate for policy improvements based on the data. This is one step in ensuring that justice and accountability is equally pursued for all violations and crimes, regardless of their nature or the sex of the victim.

  • Country

    Pakistan
  • Extracts

    Appreciable progress has been made over the years in promoting the agenda on women and peace and security, but much remains to be done to fully translate the objectives of resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent decisions of the Council into more tangible results on the ground. We do have a solid and comprehensive normative framework in our hands; resolution 2122 (2013), adopted today, further consolidates it. We should now focus on its implementation, which is key to overcoming operational gaps and challenges, and to delivering on our promise of peace and security for women, who are the most vulnerable group in armed conflicts. In conflicts, violence against women is widely used as an instrument of war. Urgent steps must be taken to stop gender-based and sexual violence and end impunity for perpetrators of sexual crimes.

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    For over a decade now, resolution 1325 (2000) has clearly confirmed its vital role and importance in strengthening the role of women in the prevention and settlement of armed conflicts and during post- conflict reconstruction, as well as in their protection during such conflicts. Unfortunately, despite numerous efforts, women continue to fall victim to various forms of violence. That is why we believe that more attention needs to be given to all categories of such crimes. Such a balanced approach is enshrined in resolution 1325 (2000). Cases of women and children being killed and getting injured are a cause for serious concern, including as a result of the indiscriminate or excessive use of force. We think it is unacceptable to simply turn a blind eye to such crimes or to justify them as so-called inevitable acts of collateral damage, which contradicts provisions in the Geneva Conventions.

  • Country

    Belarus
  • Extracts

    We are grateful to the Secretary-General and his Special Representative on Sexual Violence for their personal commitment and leadership in the fight against violence against women. We also believe that UN Women and the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights should play an important role in combating violence against women and protecting women's rights.

  • Country

    Belarus
  • Extracts

    Belarus condemns all forms of violence, including in conflict situations, particularly against the most vulnerable segments of society — women and children. As with any other country, Belarus has zero tolerance for that scourge. Security Council resolutions, including resolution 2106 (2013) adopted in June, have created a clear legal framework for responding to sexual violence in conflict and prohibited its use as a weapon of war.

  • Country

    Belarus
  • Extracts

    We believe that a thorough investigation of all acts of sexual violence and the immediate punishment of perpetrators are crucial in combatting this scourge. That violence can be eliminated only through coherent collective efforts by the international community — Member States, international organizations and civil society. Such efforts can and should be carried out through a genuine partnership based on a unified approach, respect for each other's views and agreement on the steps to be taken.

  • Country

    Belarus
  • Extracts

    Today, it is clear that there is no State in the world that would not endeavour to put an end to violence against women. The question is not who is right, who is for, who is against violence. Today, the question is how and in what way can come together through our collective efforts.

  • Country

    Belarus
  • Extracts

    In that context, we are seriously concerned about recent incidents — be they deliberate or unintentional — that replace the painstaking and time-consuming work on the formation of such a partnership with vociferous media campaigns based on documents drawn up by an inner circle and hastily gathered expressions of support for them. We are willing to believe in the sincere intentions of the proponents of that approach to combating violence against women. At the same time, we cannot but disagree with an approach that puts those States with the wisdom and strength of will to consider every word in the international documents that they sign in an awkward position.

  • Country

    Belarus
  • Extracts

    We also consider it inadmissible that members of the international community that have done a great deal, including specifically in combatting violence against women and children, have been placed in an artificially created situation and forced to justify themselves for failing to appear on a list of countries who combat sexual violence. Every State plays an important role in combating sexual violence, and no vociferous media campaign should alienate or disregard even one Member.a

  • Country

    Belarus
  • Extracts

    We pay tribute to reasonable initiatives to strengthen international support to combat sexual violence in conflict. Belarus calls for us not to replace real partnerships with unity that is merely on paper, and to avoid hasty and irresponsible actions that may devalue the noble idea of combatting this scourge.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    What distinguishes today's resolution from others is that it represents a pivot away from a narrow focus on women as victims and towards the more positive and liberating agenda of women's participation and women's leadership. Welcome attention is paid to the active role that women and women's groups can play in transforming conflict, insecurity and fragility. That aspect has been insufficiently highlighted. It is often overshadowed by the appalling suffering inflicted on women through, for example, sexual violence in conflict.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    In order to protect women's rights and ensure women's participation in conflict-affected situations, security for those who serve to uphold the rule of law, such as police officers and judges, is a basic necessity. In that regard, gender-responsive transitional justice measures and justice system reforms need to be addressed. In particular, women's access to the justice system must be strengthened so as to protect their rights, as well as to protect them from the violence that too often accompanies the transition from conflict. To that end, Japan has, for example, supported various efforts to assist victims of sexual violence in refugee camps located in such countries as the Sudan, Somalia and Iraq, by providing legal advice, representation and awareness-raising campaigns, as well as establishing relief and recovery systems that include mental health care.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    Of all violations afflicting women in conflict situations, sexual violence, which constitutes a direct attack against physical integrity, unavoidably comes to mind when one speaks of transitional justice and the issue of reparations. It is indeed difficult to imagine a society claiming to be fair and respectful of women's rights when thousands of survivors of sexual violence are denied their rights to see the perpetrators of that violence brought to justice. However, in many cases, post- conflict justice ignores the case of those women, often because it does not possess either the necessary expertise or the necessary resources to tackle the task.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    Malaysia remains concerned about sexual and gender-based crimes and strongly believes that ending impunity is crucial in our quest to put an end to sexual violence in times of conflict. We note that progress has been made over the years, and we welcome the continuing work of the United Nations and other stakeholders, including the Team of Experts on the Rule of Law and Sexual Violence in Conflict, which focuses its efforts on strengthening the capacity of the national rule of law and justice actors. We feel that the Team's engagement with relevant Governments would strengthen their capacity to effectively address sexual violence against women and girls.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    In our effort to secure peace and security, we must move urgently to replace the prevailing culture of impunity with one that promotes the rule of law, justice and accountability. Underlining the importance of ending sexual violence, Malaysia is pleased to report that it has joined many others in endorsing the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict, which makes clear the collective view on the need of greater action to address the issue.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    My delegation is concerned with the often inadequate legal frameworks on women's rights in post-conflict countries. In that matter, we could take a page from the lessons learned through established courts, such as the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and the International Criminal Tribunal of the Former Yugoslavia, which offer insightful lessons from the prosecution of sexual and gender-based crimes. Those could be applied to future tribunals and domestic judicial processes. Furthermore, Governments that have experienced conflict could consider allocating greater financial resources to investigate cases of sexual violence. There is also a need to ensure that international and national courts have adequate expertise. In that regard, countries in a position to do so should render assistance to post-conflict societies.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    In addressing the issues of women's empowerment after conflicts,attention should be given to strengthening the security of women through rules and regulations. That could be done through setting up institutional and administrative machinery to plan, coordinate, implement and monitor development programmes for women. My delegation cannot stress enough the importance of increased access for women to education and employment, as well as the development of policies and services that offer equal livelihood opportunities to women. At the same time, we must also remember the importance of access to health care, especially for victims of sexual and gender-based violence.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    In that regard, there is a need to increase the number of women in high-level decision-making positions in peacekeeping and peacebuilding operations. Malaysia is also supportive of appointing more women protection advisers to monitor and report on sexual violence in all relevant situations. We appreciate the positive values they bring in creating greater awareness of sexual violence issues, reporting incidents of sexual violence and implementing Security Council resolutions on the ground.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    We strongly believe that the subject of women, peace and security deserves the Security Council's sustained attention. Malaysia reaffirms its commitment to the efforts to address sexual violence in conflict and post- conflict situations. Nonetheless, we must insist that gender equality and efforts to encourage and instill a gender perspective be promoted during times of peace rather than solely during times of conflict. The respect and promotion of women's rights must become part of the culture of every society. In that regard, the Council can be assured of our continuous engagement and unrelenting support for the advancement of the issue in our pursuit of achieving peace and security at the national, regional and international levels.

  • Country

    Solomon Is.
  • Extracts

    Resolutions 1325 (2000), 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010) provide a framework for improving the situation of women in conflict, as articulated in the President's concept note (S/2013/587, annex). The impact of conflict on society as a whole exposes the vulnerability and dignity of women and children even more.

  • Country

    Solomon Is.
  • Extracts

    The Solomon Islands is one of the few countries that have a ministry of peace and reconciliation. We also have a ministry of women's, youth's and children's affairs. We have come a long way in implementing elements of the five resolutions on women and peace and security. In 2009 we reviewed our national policy on gender equity and women's development. In partnership with Australia, we have also undertaken a Solomon Islands family health and safety study, which has found that two out of three women in our country suffer from gender- based violence. A recent commission on the status of women found that 7 out of 10 women around the world suffer from gender-based violence. In response to that, we adopted a national policy on eliminating violence against women. Our national police have responded, adopting a no-drop policy of victim protection that deals with both victims and perpetrators. Our public solicitor's office has established a family protection unit that provides specialized services to women and children. Also, working with other non-State actors and faith-based institutions, we continue to provide shelter, counselling and support for victims of gender-based violence.

  • Country

    Thailand
  • Extracts

    My delegation is pleased to learn from UN Women that transitional justice mechanisms are increasingly responding to war crimes against women by providing specific arrangements to protect women witnesses. We also welcome the adoption of resolution 2106 (2013), in June, which focuses on accountability for perpetrators of sexual violence in conflict and stresses women's political and economic empowerment. Those mechanisms need to be effectively utilized. The Council's resolutions and presidential statements also need to be translated into actions if we are to be successful in our attempt to protect women.

  • Country

    Thailand
  • Extracts

    Just last month, Thailand joined other like-minded countries in endorsing the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict, initiated by the United Kingdom. We will continue to cooperate with all partners to eliminate sexual violence in conflict and bring the perpetrators to justice.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    Much work is being done by Member States, including by Canada, to advance the empowerment of women and girls. For example, Canada played an active role in the development of resolution 24/23, addressing child, early and forced marriage at the twenty-fourth session of the Human Rights Council, and co-hosted a side event at the General Assembly in September. Canada is leading the first stand-alone draft resolution on the important issue at the General Assembly later this year.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    Prime Minister Harper and other leaders in New York recently reviewed progress on the 2010 Muskoka summit of the Group of Eight and the United Nations initiatives to improve to improve global maternal and child health. Under Canada's leadership, the Human Rights Council adopted the robust resolution 23/25 this past June on the elimination of violence against women. The resolution lays out actions to be undertaken by Member States and the United Nations to prevent sexual violence, including in conflict-related situations, and calls on States to ensure that women are active participants in decision-making processes.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    Women and children continue to be disproportionately affected by armed conflicts and their aftermath. We have witnessed, in particular, an alarming increase in sexual violence, which is often used as a method of warfare. It has disastrous long-term consequences, not only for the victim, but also for the affected communities. Liechtenstein is proud to give its support to the sexual and gender-based violence work of the Justice Rapid Response initiative and is among the 124 States that have endorsed the United Kingdom initiative to end sexual violence in conflict.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    Mexico welcomes the adoption of the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict, and commends the initiative taken to formulate an international protocol for investigating and documenting sexual violence in conflict. We assure the Council that we will continue to support such efforts. Similarly, we consider it vital to continue to push for women's participation in mediation processes and peace agreement and ceasefire negotiations so as to encourage national reconciliation, based on respect for and enjoyment of the human, social and civil rights of the most vulnerable groups. We believe it essential to support national reconciliation and dialogue processes with judicial change that ensures that justice is impartially meted out, and including programmes for repairing and reconstructing the social fabric.

  • Country

    Qatar
  • Extracts

    We cannot talk about women and peace and security without discussing the causes of their vulnerability. There are several aspects of this that should be strengthened, first and foremost through laws that protect women in conflict without discrimination. We should call on all parties concerned to take measures to protect women and girls against gender-based and sexual violence in times of conflict.

  • Country

    Qatar
  • Extracts

    In Syria, women are being targeted for violence more than others. Under orders from the regime, acts of physical and psychological violence, rape, sexual violence, degradation and torture have been committed by members of the Syrian armed forces against their own families. Those are all war crimes and crimes against humanity. The Syrian regime bears full responsibility for sexual exploitation and trafficking in women; it is a regime that has killed thousands, making women into widows and children into orphans, and displacing people within the country and beyond its borders.

  • Country

    Slovenia
  • Extracts

    Rebuilding justice and the rule of law is critical to any post-conflict transitional process burdened by the legacies of mass atrocities, serious human-rights violations and a weakened judicial infrastructure. A gender perspective, as well as the participation of women, should be injected into those processes. Transitional justice processes should address the full range of conflict-related violations of women's rights. As particularly vulnerable victims in conflict-affected situations, women experience grave consequences from breakdowns in the rule of law, in the form of a range of violations including, but not limited to, sexual and gender-based violence. In that context, Slovenia particularly welcomes the reference to the need for access to a full range of sexual and reproductive health services in the resolution adopted today (2122 (2013)).

  • Country

    Slovenia
  • Extracts

    Addressing abhorrent violations by ensuring access to justice, formal and informal, as well as full rights of redress, is essential to the process of reconciliation and lasting peace. Importantly, preventing impunity for the perpetrators of such crimes decreases the chance that they will recur in the future. Furthermore, the representation of women should be ensured in the justice sector. Eliminating violence against women and violations of their social and economic rights is a prerequisite for ensuring their full participation in recovery. Gender-sensitive legal and institutional reforms that conform with international standards are therefore needed.

  • Country

    Slovenia
  • Extracts

    The role of international criminal courts and tribunals, in particular the International Criminal Court (ICC), remains crucial to the establishment of the rule of law, especially in cases where States are unable or unwilling to pursue accountability for serious crimes. Moreover, the contribution of international criminal justice, including the ICC, to the field of gender discrimination and crimes of sexual violence has been and will continue to be momentous. As stressed by ICC Prosecutor Bensouda in a panel on international criminal justice at a strategic forum held last month in Bled, Slovenia, the ICC should also be seen as an investment in the future of women and humankind as a whole. To that end, Slovenia will continue to firmly support the International Criminal Court and international instruments regarding individual criminal responsibility, and calls on States to accede to or ratify the Rome Statute and its amendments.

  • Country

    Syria
  • Extracts

    We cannot but express our deep concern about the deterioration of the situation in the refugee camps of our Syrian brothers, where Syrian women and girls face insecurity and are being trafficked, raped and subjected to forced marriage, all of which has been documented in international reports. Although slow and delayed, Western media reports, most recently that of Germany's RTL television, have documented the tragedy of Syrian refugees younger than 14 who have ended up in slave markets, where petrodollars turn them into concubines in the name of religion. Those who exploit the tragedy of the Syrian refugees do so deliberately in order to create a ghetto of Syrian victims and exploit them in a manner that degrades Syria and its people.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    Italy considers resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions to be key elements of its agenda for international peace and security. We are currently reviewing our national action plan with a view to accelerating its implementation over the next three years. Gender equality and women's empowerment are mainstreamed into development cooperation programmes. Specific projects on resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions are currently being implemented in Afghanistan, Lebanon, Somalia and Palestine. Italy supported the creation of the first centre for women victims of violence in Bethlehem, Palestine. In Libya, we are supporting the approval of a bill that equates victims of sexual violence with victims of war.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    It is increasingly evident that the rule of law is all too often the second victim of conflict, the first victims being women and girls. Portugal reaffirms the view that women and girls are disproportionately affected by armed conflicts and remain particularly vulnerable in post-conflict situations. Sexual and gender-based violence, child and forced marriages and disruption in education, to name but a few of the facts of conflict, are magnified when it comes to women and girls. The Security Council has repeatedly acknowledged that fact and must continue to act on such a basis. On the other hand, there is a tendency to consider transitional justice as the second-to-last concern of peace agreements, the last being the participation of women in peace agreements.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    The approach chosen today for the current debate links two fundamental principles to which Spain is particularly committed: the first is the fight against impunity for crimes against women in armed conflict, and the second is women's participation in rebuilding the rule of law in post-conflict situations in order to put an end to the structures of inequality and discrimination in the context of which those crimes were committed.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    As stated on many occasions, Spain devotes particular efforts to promoting a gender perspective in conflict situations and has had a plan of action on women, peace and security since 2007. Within that framework, our country carries out various actions within the scope of its foreign policy, cooperation and defence activities in order to guarantee the correct implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). In particular, I would like to refer to the International Seminar on Gender Perspective and Peace Operations, coordinated by the Ministries of Foreign Affairs and Defence of Spain and the Netherlands. The sixth edition of that seminar will take place next November in The Hague. The seminar includes a specific module on the role of women in the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration processes, as well as on the processes regarding security sector reform. Spanish cooperation plays a leading role in that regard through the plan on gender-sensitive peacebuilding, with a chapter dedicated to gender-sensitive transitional justice and the rule of law. Furthermore, the Office for Humanitarian Action of the Spanish Agency for International Aid for Development has elaborated a guide to address sexual violence in humanitarian interventions.

  • Country

    Switzerland
  • Extracts

    First, Switzerland puts particular stress on a gender-sensitive implementation of the transitional justice mechanisms. As Ms. Balipou pointed out earlier, women's perspectives and needs should be included in all four principles against impunity: the right to be informed, the right to justice, the right to reparations and the guarantee of non-recurrence. As we know from experience, violent conflict affects women and men differently, not only with respect to the types of violence suffered, especially sexually-based violence, but also based on their different biological and social roles and identities. Prosecutions for gender-based and sexist violence at the national and international levels are thus key to achieving reconciliation and reintegration in post-conflict societies. For example, when truth commissions investigate violations from a gender viewpoint, they identify the impact of those violations on women and men alike and can make recommendations that lead to specific gender- sensitive initiatives in terms of justice, reparation and institutional reform.

  • Country

    Switzerland
  • Extracts

    Secondly, archives are key to the fight against impunity, especially to the full realization of the right to be informed. Switzerland welcomes the work of the experts convoked at the initiative of the British Government on the prevention of gender-based violence, which makes good use of archives in order to expose sexual violence committed in conflict situations and to investigate crimes. Switzerland has seconded an expert to the working group and stands ready to contribute further expertise.

  • Country

    Switzerland
  • Extracts

    Thirdly, Switzerland welcomes the fact that the Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525) mentions the importance of access to safe abortion for women and girls who are victims of rape. Switzerland firmly believes that all women and girls have the right to control their own bodies and to be free from coercion and sexual violence. Given the increased exposure to sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict settings, those rights must be strictly guaranteed.

  • Country

    Azerbaijan
  • Extracts

    We have proposed to focus our debate on women, the rule of law and transitional justice in conflict-affected situations. In recent times, the Security Council has paid increasing attention to the issue, acknowledging that combating impunity, addressing past violations, rebuilding the justice sector and asserting the principles of the rule of law underpin efforts to build peace and stability in the aftermath of conflict. However, less attention has been paid to the gender consequences of the breakdown of the rule of law during and after conflict. While genuine gains have been made in strengthening the political will and international legal framework to secure justice and deal with conflict- related sexual violence, little has been said of the full range of violations and serious crimes experienced by women, including enforced disappearances, foreign occupation, mass forced displacement, restrictions on humanitarian aid, conflict-related human trafficking and the destruction of civilian infrastructure. There can be no tolerance for such acts. Combating impunity and strengthening both international and national justice responses are critically important in that regard.

  • Country

    Czech Rep.
  • Extracts

    The protection of human rights, including the rights of women, belongs to our foreign policy priorities. The Czech Republic takes an active stance in promoting the strengthening and effective realization of the rights of women and in preventing gender-based violence in various multilateral forums. We also raise the issue within the universal periodic review mechanism.

  • Country

    Czech Rep.
  • Extracts

    The Czech Republic fully endorses the relevant rules of international criminal law regarding “rape, sexual slavery, enforced prostitution, enforced pregnancy, enforced sterilization, or any other form of sexual violence of comparable gravity”. The Rome Statute qualifies these as a war crime, both in the context of international and non-international armed conflicts and — when it forms part of a widespread attack against a civilian population — as a crime against humanity.

  • Country

    S. Korea
  • Extracts

    While there has been significant progress in implementing resolution 1325 (2000) over the years, persistent gaps and challenges remain. For far too many women in conflict-affected societies, the mere protection of a woman's basic rights, let alone gender equality, remains a daunting challenge. In Syria, women account for the majority of the casualties and the displaced population. In the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, women continue to be victimized in the conflict. Given this shared concern, I would like to highlight the following four points.

Peacekeeping
  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    Less impressive, however, is the level of women's participation in police and military deployments. The figures of ten percent and three percent respectively remain well below the modest target of twenty percent that had been set for next year. Just as disappointing, only four of the twenty seven peace-related field missions are led by women.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    We must pay greater attention to providing better support for victims, including by ensuring protection for witnesses, victims and justice officials, providing reparation mechanisms and ensuring the systematic inclusion of women in all aspects of conflict resolution. United Nations special representatives, peacekeeping and political missions and United Nations agencies have a much greater role to play.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    India is one of the leading contributors to United Nations peacekeeping operations. Based on our broad experience, we believe that the Security Council must make resources available to implement the greater scope of peacekeeping mandates, including by providing more women protection advisers. India was the first State to successfully deploy an all-women police force as part of United Nations peacekeeping operations. We hope that more Member States will contribute a greater number of women military and police personnel to United Nations peacekeeping operations.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    India is one of the leading contributors to United Nations peacekeeping operations. Based on our broad experience, we believe that the Security Council must make resources available to implement the greater scope of peacekeeping mandates, including by providing more women protection advisers. India was the first State to successfully deploy an all-women police force as part of United Nations peacekeeping operations. We hope that more Member States will contribute a greater number of women military and police personnel to United Nations peacekeeping operations.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    The report of the Secretary-General correctly points out the need for increased participation by women in United Nations peacekeeping missions. South Africa has played its role in that regard by contributing through its police deployment, a contingent made up of 16 per cent women, which, according to the Secretary- General's report, is the highest percentage of female deployment by a troop-contributing country.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    The elimination of the root causes of conflict is the best way to prevent sexual violence and to address impunity. Combating impunity is possible only by building transparent, effective, non-discriminatory and functioning institutions and justice systems. It is vital to ensure that women and girls have access to judicial institutions and proper representation. We in the international community should pursue our efforts to support gender-sensitive judicial reform and capacity- building. It is important to provide gender expertise in peacekeeping operations and peacebuilding efforts, as well as to ensure the participation of women in those efforts.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    In post-conflict settings, women's full and effective participation is fundamental to efforts to rebuild the justice sector and to security sector reform. In Solomon Islands for example, Australia supported, through the Participating Police Force, the post-conflict recruitment and retention of female officers to the local police force. The early involvement of women, and the integration of a gender-perspective, led directly to the establishmen to critical domestic violence and sexual abuse services. More fundamentally, it also underwrote the broader processes of community rebuilding.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    In post-conflict settings, women's full and effective participation is fundamental to efforts to rebuild the justice sector and to security sector reform. In Solomon Islands for example, Australia supported, through the Participating Police Force, the post-conflict recruitment and retention of female officers to the local police force. The early involvement of women, and the integration of a gender-perspective, led directly to the establishmen to critical domestic violence and sexual abuse services. More fundamentally, it also underwrote the broader processes of community rebuilding.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    In New York, the issue of the participation of women should be included more frequently in briefings made to the Council by the Department of Peacekeeping Operations and the Department of Political Affairs, whose recommendations for better including women in conflict-resolution processes always prove to be valuable. Informal meetings of the Council with women working in the field should be continued and encouraged.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    That and other crises demonstrate the urgent need to act. This morning, we heard an eye-witness account on the Central African Republic. We have heard that the situation is tragic, encompassing sexual violence, forced disappearances, recruitment of child soldiers and, increasingly, religiously motivated violence. The precarious situation of women is shocking. The Council should remain apprised of the issue. Not only must we take the situation of women into account; beyond that, to the extent that the tragic situation of women in the Central African Republic is only part of the broader tragedy of the entire country, we must re-establish security, peace and the rule of law there. France voted in favour of resolution 2118 (2013) in that regard and will stay the course, including, if necessary, by proposing a peacekeeping operation in that country.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    We thank the Secretary- General, the Executive Director of UN Women, High Commissioner Pillay and Ms. Brigitte Balipou, the representative of the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security, for their active involvement and valuable contributions. We also welcome the unanimous adoption of resolution 2122 (2013) by the Council earlier today, calling for higher levels of women's involvement in peacekeeping and peacebuilding. It is undeniable that the role, views and leadership of women are essential if we are to truly make and sustain peace.

  • Country

    Egypt
  • Extracts

    Secondly, Egypt is deeply concerned about the increasing rates and patterns of violence against women and girls around the world, particularly sexual violence in armed conflicts and post-conflict situations. We stress the indispensable role of transitional justice and the rule of the law for the protection of women's rights and for ensuring accountability and non-impunity for perpetrators, as a key element of conflict-prevention, peacekeeping, conflict-resolution and peacebuilding. Transitional justice measures must address the full range of violations and abuses of women's human rights, including crimes committed by United Nations peacekeeping forces and personnel.

  • Country

    Egypt
  • Extracts

    In that context, we highlight the significance of the initiative taken in April by the Group of Eight on preventing sexual violence in conflict, assisting victims of sexual violence in war and preventing further peacekeeping forces and personnel.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    We call on the Department of Peacekeeping Operations Office of Rule of Law and Security Institutions to ensure gender expertise in the planning of peacekeeping operations or special missions with rule of law mandates and the gathering of gender- aggregated data when making a baseline assessment of rule of law institutions.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    The resolution 2122 (2013), adopted this morning, is another clear ref lection of the strong resolve of the Council concerning the critical role of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, peacebuilding and peacekeeping. We are particularly appreciative of the fact that the resolution provides a good reference on supporting the development and strengthening of the capacities of national institutions in order to provide sustainable assistance to women and girls affected by armed conflict and post-conflict situations.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    The critical role of women in all stages of and throughout any peace process has been reaffirmed in various United Nations resolutions and documents — not the least, of course, in resolution 1325 (2000) and its subsequent texts. The recent declaration adopted by the Peacebuilding Commission on women's economic empowerment in peacekeeping showcases yet another unyielding commitment from Member States to support the participation of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, peacebuilding and post-conflict economic recovery. The declaration also reaffirms the primary responsibility of national authorities in identifying their priorities and strategies for post- conflict peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    As stated in the Secretary-General's report on women's participation in peacebuilding (S/2010/466), it is essential to improve the approach of the United Nations in combating sexual and gender-based violence, particularly through the training for United Nations peacekeepers. In the context of peacekeeping, the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and other related resolutions has paved the way for a gender perspective mechanism in United Nations peacekeeping operations. Increasing the number of female peacekeepers on the ground would also be a positive step in support of resolution 1325 (2000). On our part, we are happy to point out that Indonesia has deployed female peacekeepers as well as military and police observers in several missions, including the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon, the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur, the United Nations Mission in South Sudan and the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    It is a matter of regret that respecting the rule of law in conflict situations continues to be a significant challenge for the international community. In our view, that is a strong reason for inclusive peace negotiations that produce peace that is durable, sustainable and long- lasting. It is also reason for including the participation and engagement of women in that process. We also believe that national reconciliation, as one tool of transitional justice, must benefit from the active participation of women. Indonesia, in that regard, agrees with the call made by the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations last year that lasting progress on security, national reconciliation, human rights, the rule of law and sustainable development needs to occur in parallel, given the interconnected nature of those challenges in countries emerging from conflict.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    United Nations field presences must fully engage with women in civil society and the community. New Zealand thus encourages a consistent practice of deploying gender advisers to peacekeeping missions, with their role continuing through any transitional arrangements to assist in post-conflict processes.

  • Country

    Rwanda
  • Extracts

    "At the continental level, Rwanda is among the leading the police-contributing countries, with female police and correctional officers serving in the United Nations peacebuilding and peacekeeping missions in Liberia, Haiti, the Sudan, Côte d'Ivoire and Chad. Those officers actively contribute to combating and raising awareness on violence against women in the communities they serve. They also serve as advisers on gender-based violence and share best practices with other officers and local authorities."

  • Country

    Rwanda
  • Extracts

    For those reasons, we support the full implementation of resolutions 1325 (2000) and 1960 (2010), which insist that all peacekeeping mandates incorporate provisions that specifically identify steps to address sexual violence, including the clear identification of women's protection advisers alongside gender advisers and human rights protection units.

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    "The events unfolding in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, in the Central African Republic — as Ms. Balipou mentioned — in Syria and elsewhere around the world, where women continue to be the special target of violence committed by men, show that there is still a long way to go to protect women in situations of armed conflict. Togo nonetheless welcomes the fact that the United Nations, through its peacekeeping operations, has made the protection of civilians an essential element in the mandates of peace missions. The deployment on the ground of gender advisers arises from that determination to help the victims and guide them to the appropriate support services. My country would like to see the deployment of such advisers mainstreamed throughout all missions, with the staffing and resources that they need."

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    We call on the Security Council to make the best use of the time frame leading up to the high- level review of the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in 2015 and to mainstream measures to enhance women's participation in its work, including in the mandates of peacekeeping and political missions. Our immediate concern must be to increase the number of women in police and military contingents in United Nations peacekeeping operations. In that regard, we welcome today's adoption of resolution 2122 (2013) and its references to the deployment of women in United Nations peacekeeping operations as well as more regular briefings in the Security Council.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Transitional justice and the rule of law are crucial elements for the prevention and solution of conflicts. We therefore very much welcome the theme of today's debate, which emphasizes the importance of gender- sensitive systems. Women need to be part of all truth and justice commissions, and women's concerns need to be addressed in those fact-finding bodies. At the same time, perpetrators of violence, crimes and human rights violations need to be held accountable for their actions. That is the most promising way to promote lasting reconciliation. Germany has supported several projects in Rwanda and Burundi to train female police officers on the prevention and investigation of sexual and gender-based violence. In Cambodia and Uganda, Germany has supported the access of women to the justice system through legal and psychosocial counseling.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Secondly, 43 countries have adopted national action plans on women, peace and security. That is an important first step. However, any progress on the ground depends on the political will to abide by those commitments. The German national action plan, which was adopted last year, covers the four focus areas set out in resolution 1325 (2000) and additionally includes the areas of preparation for peace missions and the prosecution of crimes. The implementation of the action plan is monitored by an inter-ministerial working group in collaboration with representatives from civil society. German diplomatic missions abroad have been instructed to support the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), for example by advocating for the inclusion of women in local crisis prevention, conflict management and post-conflict peacebuilding or by supporting gender-sensitive projects on the ground.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    Among others, resolution 2106 (2013) underlines the importance of women's greater participation and leadership in decision-making processes in areas of conflict. In many cases, women are excluded from decision-making. Nevertheless, their full and equal participation in peacemaking and peacebuilding is indispensable for the success of those processes, since it is the only way to ensure that the needs of women involved in conflict-related situations are effectively addressed. Women must be seen not solely as victims, but as active agents of change and of peacekeeping.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    My delegation welcomes the efforts undertaken by the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO) in the protection of women in armed conflict and the consideration of gender-specific issues in the framework of the maintenance of peace. We stress that it is important that DPKO strengthen its work on the ground, in coordination with the relevant parties.

  • Country

    Pakistan
  • Extracts

    Pakistan fully supports the objectives of the agenda on women and peace and security. We have played an important role in advancing those goals as a major participant in United Nations peacekeeping operations. Pakistani women peacekeepers have served as police officers, doctors and nurses in missions in Asia, Africa and the Balkans. Gender sensitization is a mandatory part of our peacekeepers' training.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    In order to promote women truly shouldering their peacekeeping roles and playing at important part in peacebuilding processes, the various United Nations bodies and entities should work in accordance with their respective mandates, with a clear division of labour and as one. I wish to highlight the following four points.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    I would add that, in the past year, we supported a Department of Peacekeeping Operations project aimed at bolstering the role of women in the maintenance and building of peace, specifically by holding a regional workshop in Liberia to provide women leaders working for peace and security in West Africa an opportunity to share their experiences and to strengthen their networks.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    In that regard, there is a need to increase the number of women in high-level decision-making positions in peacekeeping and peacebuilding operations. Malaysia is also supportive of appointing more women protection advisers to monitor and report on sexual violence in all relevant situations. We appreciate the positive values they bring in creating greater awareness of sexual violence issues, reporting incidents of sexual violence and implementing Security Council resolutions on the ground.

  • Country

    Qatar
  • Extracts

    We also recognize the positive contribution of the Security Council to the rule of law, which is one of the key aspects of conflict prevention, peacekeeping, conflict resolution and peacebuilding. We fully agree with the prevailing position that justice, including transitional justice, is a fundamental building block of sustainable peace in countries in conflict or post- conflict situations. Delivering justice and security in respect of the rule of law mitigates conflict, helps reduce the risk of relapse into further conflict and creates conditions conducive to sustainable development.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    In 2015, the Security Council will hold a high- level meeting to review the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). The Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525) includes strategic measures to accelerate implementation, of which I would like to highlight three recommendations: increasing women's participation in United Nations peacekeeping and political missions, especially at the middle — and senior-management levels; reaching the target of 15 per cent spending for post-conflict peacebuilding projects on gender equality and women's empowerment; and systematically addressing all elements of resolution 1325 (2000) in the work of the Security Council.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    With regard to peacekeeping and peacebuilding, we also find encouraging examples of clearer political will and adequate allocation of resources aimed at increasing the proportion of women in uniformed components in operations and in national security sector institutions.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    The Council has heard, on a regular basis and and directly from the ground, requests for further strengthening the implementation of protection mandates. We hope that the targets set by the Department of Peacekeeping Operations of 20 per cent for female police participation in peacekeeping operations by 2014 will be attained. Portugal continues to develop policies to promote the recruitment and retention of women in the military and in the police forces, and looks forward to cooperate further in training and in sharing good practices with other troop and police-contributing countries.

  • Country

    Switzerland
  • Extracts

    Our country therefore urges the Security Council, among other matters, to ensure that gender advisers are deployed in all peace missions and that effective mechanisms are introduced so that information concerning the situation of women and girls can be presented in a systematic manner in reports and transmitted in Security Council debates. In that regard, Switzerland welcomes resolution 2122 (2013), adopted earlier today, which broadly accommodates the concrete recommendations in that sense. Nonetheless, it would have been better yet to have adopted the resolution after this debate in order to more fully take into account the views expressed by the participants.

Displacement and Humanitarian Response
  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    In recent years, the United Nations has augmented its involvement in establishing and supporting transitional justice measures, furthering women's rights in post- conflict societies. The United Nations-supported truth commissions in Mali, Kenya and Cote d'Ivoire have addressed gender-based crimes. Yet more must be done to ensure that transitional justice addresses a full range of gender-specific crimes, including human trafficking, early or forced marriages, the links between sexual violence and natural-resource extraction, withholding humanitarian assistance, enforced disappearances and forced displacement.

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    "From resolution 1208 (1998), on security for refugees, which underscores the special security needs of women in camps, to resolution 1314 (2000), which underscores the importance of prevention, disarmament, demobilization and reintegration policies including a gender perspective, it is clear we have made progress. However, it was particularly through resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions focused on the situation of women in conflict and post-conflict situations that the Council underscored, as priorities in achieving lasting peace, the promotion and protection of women's human rights and their equal participation in transitional justice and reconciliation processes, as well as a human rights perspective and a gender perspective in all the efforts and programmes for development, peace, security and the building and strengthening of the rule of law."

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    Of the over 2 million refugees from Syria today, 78 per cent are women and girls. Having fled the violence in Syria, they are attempting to navigate a tidal wave of new threats – sexual violence, mass forced displacement, early and forced marriage, forced pregnancies and exploitation. These circumstances must not prevent their vital contribution to reconstructing a safe and functioning Syrian society, and we must ensure that their leadership is harnessed as part of the solution.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    In Syria, women were the leading actors of the peaceful revolution against the regime of Bashar Al-Assad. Their vulnerability is today increasing everywhere, placing them at the forefront of the victims. They are the targets of both the fierce repression of the regime against its own people and, now, of extremist groups. In the refugee camps, their children are often born stateless as a result of unequal citizenship laws. We must listen to these Syrian women, who remain committed to building the future of Syria, and involve them in the peace negotiations.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    As a country that hosts tens of thousands of refugees as a result of aggression and war imposed on Armenia, we attach particular importance to this debate. It is nothing new to say that the costs of conflicts are borne disproportionately by women and girls and, since it is primarily women who pay the price when peace is absent, they are important stakeholders in peacebuilding. As such, the inclusion of women in all stages of peace processes guarantees a more lasting and representative settlement.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    Particularly egregious is the practice of child, early and forced marriage, which puts the very lives of young girls at risk. That practice denies girls' rights, disrupts their access to education, severely jeopardizes their health and limits the development of their community as a whole. Conflict situations exacerbate that practice among displaced and refugee populations, such as we know to be the case in Syria. Canada encourages the Security Council to continue to provide political leadership and to take action to ensure the meaningful participation of women in conflict prevention, mediation and resolution processes.

  • Country

    Syria
  • Extracts

    We cannot but express our deep concern about the deterioration of the situation in the refugee camps of our Syrian brothers, where Syrian women and girls face insecurity and are being trafficked, raped and subjected to forced marriage, all of which has been documented in international reports. Although slow and delayed, Western media reports, most recently that of Germany's RTL television, have documented the tragedy of Syrian refugees younger than 14 who have ended up in slave markets, where petrodollars turn them into concubines in the name of religion. Those who exploit the tragedy of the Syrian refugees do so deliberately in order to create a ghetto of Syrian victims and exploit them in a manner that degrades Syria and its people.

  • Country

    Azerbaijan
  • Extracts

    We have proposed to focus our debate on women, the rule of law and transitional justice in conflict-affected situations. In recent times, the Security Council has paid increasing attention to the issue, acknowledging that combating impunity, addressing past violations, rebuilding the justice sector and asserting the principles of the rule of law underpin efforts to build peace and stability in the aftermath of conflict. However, less attention has been paid to the gender consequences of the breakdown of the rule of law during and after conflict. While genuine gains have been made in strengthening the political will and international legal framework to secure justice and deal with conflict- related sexual violence, little has been said of the full range of violations and serious crimes experienced by women, including enforced disappearances, foreign occupation, mass forced displacement, restrictions on humanitarian aid, conflict-related human trafficking and the destruction of civilian infrastructure. There can be no tolerance for such acts. Combating impunity and strengthening both international and national justice responses are critically important in that regard.

Human Rights
  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    This reality is, in turn, linked to achievement of all eight of the UN's Millennium Development Goals, whether directly – as in women's empowerment – or as a logical consequence – as in the areas of universal education, maternal health, child mortality, and environmental protection. Progress towards one of these essential goals will make gains easier in the others – and all are connected to women's participation in peace and security.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Strengthening international and national justice responses to conflict-related violence against women is crucial. In the aftermath of conflict, it is vital to develop transitional justice mechanisms and institutions and to rebuild the rule of law to protect women's rights.

  • Speaker

    NATO
  • Extracts

    NATO's overall purpose is to safeguard the freedom and security of all its members by political and military means. The Alliance is not defined by the threats we face, rather it is defined by the values we share. We are united by the principles of individual liberty, democracy, human rights and the rule of law.

  • Speaker

    NATO
  • Extracts

    We should, however, not regard women as passive victims and recipients. Just as women need to be included in the prevention, management and resolution of conflicts, women need to be included also in reconciliation and transitional justice. Women's participation is a matter of basic human rights and democratic principles. Those most affected by conflicts must be heard and enabled to contribute to the solutions that prevent conflicts. We cannot afford not to include women. It is not simply a question of what benefits women, but of what benefits the whole society — men and women, boys and girls.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Women's legal status and rights must be ensured in post-conflict situations. Strengthening the legal framework to address issues of discrimination against women with respect to land ownership, access to economic opportunity and employment, education and health care is an essential component of gender- responsive peacebuilding architecture.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    Sexual violence in armed conflicts, from the early stages of conflict to its aftermath, is one of the gravest human rights abuses committed against women and girls. In situations of conflict, sexual violence is often used as a weapon of war — a strategy to deprive human beings of their most basic rights, their safety, security and dignity. Sexual violence can exacerbate and prolong armed conflicts and may impede the restoration of international peace and security, as posited in many relevant Security Council resolutions to date.

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    "We cannot lock ourselves inside a laboratory to restore and recognize women's human rights or to build a genuine rule of law. In that connection, I would like to end with the testimony of women from various parts of the world. In this century, in one country in Africa, 1,152 women were raped every day — that is 48 every hour or four every five minutes. In another area of that continent, a woman reported that, when women tried to escape, their children were killed. She said that they raped lots of women and girls and were happy when they raped them. They even sang while they raped them and told them they had the right to do whatever they wish with women. In another country, a women's organization told us that the criminal code there still interprets rape as a form of adultery. If a women cannot prove that there was no consent and if there are not at least four witnesses who confirm her testimony, women are punished for adultery by whipping or stoning. In a country in Asia, we heard recently from a group of women who were subjected to sexual torture. Their genitals were burned, they said. They were forced into prostitution by security forces, rebel groups and members of peacekeeping missions. In Europe, a women from the former Yugoslavia testified that in the camps the soldiers raped her all day long. She would fall asleep, but when she awoke a different soldier would be in her bed."

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    In that regard, we can refer to the example of Mary Robinson, who brought together women's organizations from the Great Lakes region in July in Bujumbura. We believe that hers is a model of inclusive and early consultation that can be useful to everyone. We saw to it that this good practice was continued during the recent visit of Security Council members to the Democratic Republic of the Congo when they met, in the eastern part of that country, with women's organizations working to defend and promote the rights of women.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    The action plan provides a detailed regional framework to enhance women's and young women's leadership in conflict prevention and peacebuilding, mainstream gender and ensure the protection of women's and girls' human rights in humanitarian crises and in transitioning from conflict, disaster or post-conflict situations — all with a mechanism to accelerate the implementation of existing international, regional and national commitments on women, peace and security.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    We view this open debate as an opportunity to highlight the policies and programmes aimed at supporting national ownership and reform of justice systems that place women's rights and access to justice for women at their heart. As the recent declaration of the Peacebuilding Commission on women's economic empowerment for peacebuilding underscores, societies that invest in women see exponential dividends from such investments. We believe that justice sector reform must start with the reform of laws to ensure that women have equal rights in all spheres. It must include reforms to strengthen women's access to the justice system and to promote and protect their rights and to protect women from the violence and insecurity that too often accompany transitions from conflict.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    Recently, the United Nations has developed an increasingly sophisticated network for specialized gender experts for deployment to mediation, transitional justice and prosecutorial processes. Member States should avail themselves of these important resources. For example, the regular deployments of UN Women to commissions of enquiry over the past three years have produced a steady improvement in the extent to which human rights abuses against women are reported and acted upon. This is a direct result of the quality of expertise and the regular deployment of experts to those bodies.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    The Security Council's engagement with the issue of women and peace and security has greatly contributed to our common efforts to improve the lives of women in conflict situations around the world. The resolutions adopted by the Council have created a comprehensive body of norms and stimulated progress on the protection and promotion of women's rights.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    The scourge of sexual violence in armed conflict has rightly been the subject of attention by the Council. It is warranted that we also focus on the importance of furthering the equal rights of women and their right to equal participation in decision-making processes.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    Brazil embraces a comprehensive notion of the rule of law that embodies a number of principles and experiences. We are convinced that the rule of law and development are strongly interrelated and mutually reinforcing. The rule of law is intimately connected to the realization of social and economic rights. In that regard, we are proud to celebrate, in 2013, the twenty- fifth year of the Brazilian Constitution, whereby we acknowledged the centrality of social and economic rights in the context of the rule of law and human rights.

  • Country

    Egypt
  • Extracts

    Secondly, Egypt is deeply concerned about the increasing rates and patterns of violence against women and girls around the world, particularly sexual violence in armed conflicts and post-conflict situations. We stress the indispensable role of transitional justice and the rule of the law for the protection of women's rights and for ensuring accountability and non-impunity for perpetrators, as a key element of conflict-prevention, peacekeeping, conflict-resolution and peacebuilding. Transitional justice measures must address the full range of violations and abuses of women's human rights, including crimes committed by United Nations peacekeeping forces and personnel.

  • Country

    Egypt
  • Extracts

    The practices of the Israeli occupation in the Arab occupied territories are a clear manifestation of violations of the human rights and fundamental freedoms of Arab women and girls under foreign occupation. Egypt stresses the responsibility of the United Nations system, as well as all international organizations concerned with women's issues, towards women under foreign occupation. There is definitely a need to pay greater attention to their suffering in order to ensure their full rights, in accordance with the relevant provisions of international law, international humanitarian law and human rights law. We request all senior officials and field-based entities responsible for reporting to the Council, particularly UN Women and the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, to systematically include information on the situation of women and girls in Arab-occupied territories in their reports and briefings.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    We welcome the theme of today's debate, with its particular focus on the rule of law and transitional justice during and post-conflict, which have received limited attention to date. Yet the breakdown of the rule of law in conflict leads to a broad range of violations of women's and girls' rights. To address that challenge, post-conflict reforms need to be gender-sensitive and women's access to justice in conflict and post-conflict settings needs to be secured. Women need to be represented in the justice sector.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    The provision of fair, transparent, effective and accountable justice mechanisms for all is crucial to ensuring the benefits of the rule of law for everyone. Women's and girls' rights must be secured; they must also be ensured in informal justice systems. Given the broad range of conflict-related violations of women's rights — including enforced disappearance, early and forced marriage, human trafficking and violations of economic and social rights — transitional justice processes need to address them in full. The EU is now working on establishing its policy on transitional justice. The way justice related issues are addressed in peace negotiations has a strong impact on the pursuit of post-conflict justice and mediators can play an important role in that regard.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    In that context, Indonesia wishes to emphasize the critical importance of sustaining political momentum behind ongoing peacebuilding processes, promoting gender equality and promoting and protecting the human rights of women. We are fully convinced that the involvement of women in all aspects of society unleashes a vast and dynamic pool of ideas, creativity and skills, which inspire society to move on and gain prosperity. Therefore, the promotion and protection of human rights for all, including women in conflict- affected countries, is evidently crucial. Furthermore, the ability of women to exercise their rights and responsibilities will define a successful transition to peace and stability based on the rule of law.

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    The Secretary-General's report also indicates that in the context of economic recovery and access to resources during and after conflict, women have also played a very limited role. My country believes that women should enjoy, in peacetime and in conflict situations, all economic and social rights, inheritance and property rights, and access to basic services, especially in areas of health and education.

  • Speaker

    African Union
  • Extracts

    The African Union reaffirms its support for the advancement of holistic justice for women in situations of conflict, post-conflict, political violence and gross human rights violations. African Union documents, such as the Constitutive Act, enshrine a commitment to the advancement of gender equality and the protection of women from gender-based and other forms of violence. Furthermore, the prevention, protection and promotion of women's rights have been aptly addressed in the 2003 Protocol to the African Charter on Human and People's Rights on the Rights of Women, the 2004 Solemn Declaration on Gender Equality in Africa, and the 2009 African Union Gender Policy, which contains provisions on mainstreaming gender equality.

  • Speaker

    African Union
  • Extracts

    The African Union looks forward to the adoption of the policy framework and remains convinced that this document will be make a significant contribution to “comprehensively promote justice and accountability in ways that further the equal rights of women and the right to equal participation in decision-making” (S/2013/587, annex, p. 2).

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    The Security Council has clearly recognized its own role in ending impunity for serious violations of international humanitarian and human-rights law, and has acknowledged the full range of justice and reconciliation mechanisms, including in resolution 1894 (2009). In that context, we would like to stress the important role of the International Criminal Court and other international criminal tribunals in the fight against impunity, and we welcome the first investigations of cases of sexual violence before those courts.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    A central element of our understanding of the rule of law is that it not only guarantees women's equal rights but necessarily implies women's equal participation in political and public life, as well as their economic empowerment. While the full, equal and meaningful participation of women in all conflict prevention, resolution and peacebuilding efforts is at the heart of resolution 1325 (2000) and should be self- evident 13 years after its adoption, there is no reason for complacency.

  • Country

    Belgium
  • Extracts

    Belgium welcomes the theme chosen for today's debate. We also sponsored resolution 2122 (2013), adopted today. The rule of law and transitional justice in relation to gender have not yet received sufficient attention, despite the fact that they are key to the promotion and protection of women's rights in post- conflict situations. My country welcomes the fact that this debate is also focusing on the rebuilding of justice mechanisms that guarantee women non-discriminatory access to justice in post-conflict societies.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Conflicts create situations in which women and children are the ones most affected by the deterioration of living conditions and fundamental rights. Violence and the deprivation of rights often go hand in hand with conflict. Efforts to fight impunity, provide assistance to victims and hold perpetrators accountable must be intensified and better coordinated. Regrettably, sexual and gender-based violence often continue after peace deals are reached, due to insufficient investment in protection and prevention strategies, or weak security and justice institutions. We are aware of the fact that peace cannot be sustained unless women play a critical role in the process. We therefore underscore the importance of the full and effective involvement of women at all stages of peace processes and of giving them an equal role in the prevention and resolution of conflicts, as well as in early peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    Estonia is dedicated to protecting and promoting human rights and fundamental freedoms, both nationally and internationally. As a member of the Human Rights Council, our particular focus is on the rights of women and children, gender perspective in conflict settlements and the fight against impunity. Estonia firmly believes that the rule of law in conflict and post-conflict situations must promote justice and accountability in ways that further the rights of women, including through legal and institutional reforms that are gender sensitive. The equal right to decision-making and participation, along with women's empowerment, is crucial to ensure a functioning society and peace and justice in the aftermath of conflicts.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    Estonia would also like to take the opportunity to emphasize that in addition to conflict-related sexual violence, increased attention should be paid to the full range of violations and serious crimes experienced by women, including gendered impacts of enforced disappearances, foreign occupation, mass forced displacement, restrictions on humanitarian aid, conflict-related trafficking and the destruction of civilian infrastructure.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    The signing of peace agreements and ceasefire agreements and the implementation of national action plans and programmes for the protection of women in conflict-affected countries have made it possible to identify, in a more appropriate way, the ways and means likely to promote women's rights and to strengthen their participation in efforts to prevent and resolve conflicts and in post-conflict reconstruction.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    Within the politico-military dimension the OSCE Forum for Security Co-operation promotes the inclusion of women in the military, including in combat positions, making sure that civilian oversight and the human rights in the armed forces are guaranteed for both men and women.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    Rebuilding justice and the rule of law is fundamental to protecting women's equal rights and creating a more stable, secure and just society.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    As the Secretary-General has highlighted, women's representation in the justice sector is crucial and helps increase the reporting of crimes. Barriers must be removed so that women can access justice in formal and traditional settings. For example, we have seen success through the use of mobile courts in the Democratic Republic of Congo and paralegal support groups in Nepal. In addition, the most basic needs must be provided for, from access to safe public transportation to the effective delivery of services like water and electricity, as Ms Balipou so eloquently highlighted in her statement earlier.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Respecting and protecting women's rights and interests is not only the epitome of the civilization and progress of human society, but is also closely related to world peace and development. The international community should not only be concerned with protecting women's safety and upholding their rights and interests in conflict and post-conflict situations; it should also devote attention to ensuring that women can play their unique roles in peace processes.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Secondly, the Security Council should play its unique role fully, while strengthening its coordination and cooperation with related organizations and agencies. As the primary institution for maintaining international peace and security, the Council should focus on conflict prevention, dispute mediation and post-conflict reconstruction so as to foster an enabling political, security and rule-of-law environment for safeguarding women's security, rights and interests. The General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council, the Human Rights Council, UN Women and other United Nations agencies should discharge their respective responsibilities while working closely with one another with a view to generating synergies.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Thirdly, strengthening the rule of law represents both an important link in post-conflict peacebuilding efforts and an important foundation for safeguarding and upholding women's rights and interests. To prevent women from once again falling prey to various atrocities, it is essential to ensure their equal participation in the process of reforming the security and justice sectors, while maintaining parallel progress on the tracks of the rule of law, political and economic development and national reconciliation, thus providing a comprehensive guarantee for the respect and protection of women's rights and interests.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Fourthly, the effective participation of women is an important foundation for realizing sustainable peace and social stability. Women should become important participants in conflict prevention and mediation, and they should enjoy adequate rights when it comes to decision-making and participation in post-conflict peacebuilding and national development. That is in the interests of changing their vulnerable status, while maintaining their rights and interests in practical terms.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    Fortunately, as the report of the Secretary- General of 4 September (S/2013/525) acknowledges, times of transition and flux can present opportunities to strengthen women's leadership, empowerment and rights in the process of restoring the rule of law and governance systems. As his report indicates, the participation of women in peace negotiations and donor conferences has increased over the past year. Active support for such participation, which is being provided by gender experts and women's civil society organizations, is growing, and some peace agreements have included gender-sensitive language. That is encouraging. Yet the progress being made is hard fought and uneven.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    One of the most eloquent champions of women's rights in the world today is Mary Robinson, a former President of Ireland and the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for the Great Lakes Region. The “Framework of Hope” that she has set out for progress in that region highlights the empowerment of women as a factor of critical importance. It is based on a vision of reaching beyond traditional political leaders to energize civil society, especially women's groups. The Bujumbura declaration of 11 July 2013 was a product of that approach.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    In order to protect women's rights and ensure women's participation in conflict-affected situations, security for those who serve to uphold the rule of law, such as police officers and judges, is a basic necessity. In that regard, gender-responsive transitional justice measures and justice system reforms need to be addressed. In particular, women's access to the justice system must be strengthened so as to protect their rights, as well as to protect them from the violence that too often accompanies the transition from conflict. To that end, Japan has, for example, supported various efforts to assist victims of sexual violence in refugee camps located in such countries as the Sudan, Somalia and Iraq, by providing legal advice, representation and awareness-raising campaigns, as well as establishing relief and recovery systems that include mental health care.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    In that context, one cannot but emphasize the importance of transitional justice. Not only does it allow the possibility to redress past wrongs, but it also affords an opportunity to transform women's situations, thereby guaranteeing lasting peace in a more egalitarian society. The participation of women at all levels and in a timely manner is indispensable to guarantee that the new society that emerges from the rubble of war will grant women their rightful place with the full enjoyment of all their rights.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    Of all violations afflicting women in conflict situations, sexual violence, which constitutes a direct attack against physical integrity, unavoidably comes to mind when one speaks of transitional justice and the issue of reparations. It is indeed difficult to imagine a society claiming to be fair and respectful of women's rights when thousands of survivors of sexual violence are denied their rights to see the perpetrators of that violence brought to justice. However, in many cases, post- conflict justice ignores the case of those women, often because it does not possess either the necessary expertise or the necessary resources to tackle the task.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    My delegation is concerned with the often inadequate legal frameworks on women's rights in post-conflict countries. In that matter, we could take a page from the lessons learned through established courts, such as the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and the International Criminal Tribunal of the Former Yugoslavia, which offer insightful lessons from the prosecution of sexual and gender-based crimes. Those could be applied to future tribunals and domestic judicial processes. Furthermore, Governments that have experienced conflict could consider allocating greater financial resources to investigate cases of sexual violence. There is also a need to ensure that international and national courts have adequate expertise. In that regard, countries in a position to do so should render assistance to post-conflict societies.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    In addressing the issues of women's empowerment after conflicts,attention should be given to strengthening the security of women through rules and regulations. That could be done through setting up institutional and administrative machinery to plan, coordinate, implement and monitor development programmes for women. My delegation cannot stress enough the importance of increased access for women to education and employment, as well as the development of policies and services that offer equal livelihood opportunities to women. At the same time, we must also remember the importance of access to health care, especially for victims of sexual and gender-based violence.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    We strongly believe that the subject of women, peace and security deserves the Security Council's sustained attention. Malaysia reaffirms its commitment to the efforts to address sexual violence in conflict and post- conflict situations. Nonetheless, we must insist that gender equality and efforts to encourage and instill a gender perspective be promoted during times of peace rather than solely during times of conflict. The respect and promotion of women's rights must become part of the culture of every society. In that regard, the Council can be assured of our continuous engagement and unrelenting support for the advancement of the issue in our pursuit of achieving peace and security at the national, regional and international levels.

  • Country

    Thailand
  • Extracts

    A situation of conflict creates particular challenges in terms of human rights and upholding the rule of law. As is rightly mentioned by the Secretary-General in his report, rebuilding justice and the rule of law and enhancing gender-sensitive legal and institutional reform, in conformity with international standards, is crucial to protecting women's equal and inviolable rights in the aftermath of conflict. Measures to protect women victims and to redress wrongs against them and bring perpetrators to justice deserve particular attention from the Security Council and the cooperation of the international community.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    Particularly egregious is the practice of child, early and forced marriage, which puts the very lives of young girls at risk. That practice denies girls' rights, disrupts their access to education, severely jeopardizes their health and limits the development of their community as a whole. Conflict situations exacerbate that practice among displaced and refugee populations, such as we know to be the case in Syria. Canada encourages the Security Council to continue to provide political leadership and to take action to ensure the meaningful participation of women in conflict prevention, mediation and resolution processes.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    Prime Minister Harper and other leaders in New York recently reviewed progress on the 2010 Muskoka summit of the Group of Eight and the United Nations initiatives to improve to improve global maternal and child health. Under Canada's leadership, the Human Rights Council adopted the robust resolution 23/25 this past June on the elimination of violence against women. The resolution lays out actions to be undertaken by Member States and the United Nations to prevent sexual violence, including in conflict-related situations, and calls on States to ensure that women are active participants in decision-making processes.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    Mexico welcomes the adoption of the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict, and commends the initiative taken to formulate an international protocol for investigating and documenting sexual violence in conflict. We assure the Council that we will continue to support such efforts. Similarly, we consider it vital to continue to push for women's participation in mediation processes and peace agreement and ceasefire negotiations so as to encourage national reconciliation, based on respect for and enjoyment of the human, social and civil rights of the most vulnerable groups. We believe it essential to support national reconciliation and dialogue processes with judicial change that ensures that justice is impartially meted out, and including programmes for repairing and reconstructing the social fabric.

  • Country

    Qatar
  • Extracts

    Thirteen years after the adoption of the historic resolution 1325 (2000), the culmination of a long process concerning women and international peace and security, the Security Council is still considering the issue. Our debates, however, reveal shortcomings in the area of the rights of women, which are being terribly violated, particularly in the Arab world. The Security Council has established several criteria for women's contributions to settling conflicts and their role in conflict and post-conflict situations. Those criteria should be implemented, in conformity with Security Council provisions, in order to achieve the goals of women's participation in conflict resolution and the reconstruction of society in the aftermath of conflict. Women should be integrated into peace negotiations and into social reconstruction. Their participation at every level is still incomplete. Their access to transitional justice systems must be facilitated, including in relation to crimes committed in conflict, especially since women and children are victims of particular types of crime and subject to discrimination, and they face social and cultural impediments that hinder their access to justice mechanisms.

  • Country

    Qatar
  • Extracts

    The State of Qatar understands the importance of the rule of law and of strengthening women's participation and promoting women's and girls' rights in post-conflict reconstruction and conflict resolution. Their participation should be strengthened in order to enable them to function in the political arena, particularly through a collection of initiatives enabling their comprehensive inclusion.

  • Country

    Qatar
  • Extracts

    We are very concerned about the situation of women in armed conflict. Because of violations of their human rights, women shoulder the heaviest burden of conflict. In Palestine, they suffer the unjust effects of the Israeli occupation, which affects the entire population in the occupied territories, particularly in Gaza. It is women who have to deal with the difficulties resulting from Israeli practices and the blockade. The mobility of Palestinian women continues to be hindered by checkpoints, and women are subjected to practices that contravene all international and moral principles.

  • Country

    Slovenia
  • Extracts

    Rebuilding justice and the rule of law is critical to any post-conflict transitional process burdened by the legacies of mass atrocities, serious human-rights violations and a weakened judicial infrastructure. A gender perspective, as well as the participation of women, should be injected into those processes. Transitional justice processes should address the full range of conflict-related violations of women's rights. As particularly vulnerable victims in conflict-affected situations, women experience grave consequences from breakdowns in the rule of law, in the form of a range of violations including, but not limited to, sexual and gender-based violence. In that context, Slovenia particularly welcomes the reference to the need for access to a full range of sexual and reproductive health services in the resolution adopted today (2122 (2013)).

  • Country

    Slovenia
  • Extracts

    The primary responsibility for the prosecution of conflict-related crimes, including violations of women's rights, belongs to States. However, while the principle of complementarity enhances national capabilities to prosecute such crimes effectively, more efforts must be made to improve criminal justice at the national level. The international legal framework for judicial assistance to countries should be strengthened. That includes extradition between States in order to support the effective prosecution of international crimes at the national level. Having recognized that legal gap, Slovenia has been working together with the Netherlands and Belgium on an initiative to consider the possibility of adopting a new international instrument for mutual legal assistance and extradition for the effective investigation and prosecution of the most serious crimes of international concern by domestic jurisdictions. We intend to continue our activities in that regard in the framework of the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, and invite other States to join the initiative.

  • Country

    Syria
  • Extracts

    My country, Syria, has long been among the fairest countries in the Arab and Islamic world in securing all the necessary provisions and environment for enabling women to enjoy equal rights with men, free from the ignorance, blindness and social and intellectual shortcomings that prevail elsewhere. A woman serves as a Vice-President in my country at a time when other countries ban women from driving cars.

  • Country

    Syria
  • Extracts

    Regrettably, the current crisis in Syria has evoked a strange and inhumane phenomenon that runs contrary to the values of the Syrian people and all the legal instruments that Syria has signed and acceded to in its efforts to support the rights of women and children. The current situation runs contrary to the principles of the Islamic religion and Arab chivalry. That change came about with the arrival of mercenaries and takfiris who are openly recruited from all parts of the world to impose unjust Wahhabi ideas that degrade women and turn them into concubines.

  • Country

    Syria
  • Extracts

    The Syrian authorities are eager to bring to justice all those who commit such crimes, and we are documenting those grave violations. Syria arrests the perpetrators and subjects them to accountability under Syrian national law. On the other hand, we must work together to remove the root causes of crimes against women and girls and to combat impunity by immediately putting pressure on the regimes that seek to promote terrorism in Syria to halt their financial support and the provision of arms, as well as to end the media coverage they give to terrorist groups that violate women's basic rights. We call for the accountability of the regimes of both Qatar and Saudi Arabia for their support for and the media coverage they provide to the crazy, irresponsible minds that encourage the rape of innocent Syrian women.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    We appreciate the focus of today's debate — women's rights must be an integral component of efforts to rebuild justice and rule of law in conflict and post- conflict situations. I wish to address three areas. First, with regard to participation, we need to remove the obstacles blocking women's access to justice, which are often rooted in traditional and cultural attitudes, increase the number of women in national and international judiciary bodies and ensure that gender awareness informs their decisions. Secondly, with respect to protection, laws must be gender-sensitive, including by upholding the right of women to own land and by criminalizing sexual and gender-based violence; there should be no amnesty for such crimes. Thirdly, as to reparations, to be effective, they must have the strength to prevent the recurrence of violations and eliminate the root causes of gender inequality.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    Let me conclude by stressing the role of the economic, social and cultural rights of women as a central component of protection. Portugal strongly supports the inclusion of this subject in the Secretary- General's latest report (S/2013/525). These issues belong at the forefront of our discussions on women and peace and security and we commend his effort to do so. Further analysis of the relationship between the stability of livelihoods and the safety of women and girls is therefore, from our point of view, crucial. We encourage the United Nations to continue to give it due attention.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    I will conclude by quoting the words of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, who, on the occasion of an expert-level dialogue on the approach of the United Nations on transitional justice, pointed out that peace processes constitute historic opportunities for broadening the goals of post-conflict justice. Spain wants those opportunities effectively recognize women's rights, both in terms of guarantees of justice and conditions of peace.

  • Country

    Switzerland
  • Extracts

    Thirdly, Switzerland welcomes the fact that the Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525) mentions the importance of access to safe abortion for women and girls who are victims of rape. Switzerland firmly believes that all women and girls have the right to control their own bodies and to be free from coercion and sexual violence. Given the increased exposure to sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict settings, those rights must be strictly guaranteed.

  • Country

    Azerbaijan
  • Extracts

    We have proposed to focus our debate on women, the rule of law and transitional justice in conflict-affected situations. In recent times, the Security Council has paid increasing attention to the issue, acknowledging that combating impunity, addressing past violations, rebuilding the justice sector and asserting the principles of the rule of law underpin efforts to build peace and stability in the aftermath of conflict. However, less attention has been paid to the gender consequences of the breakdown of the rule of law during and after conflict. While genuine gains have been made in strengthening the political will and international legal framework to secure justice and deal with conflict- related sexual violence, little has been said of the full range of violations and serious crimes experienced by women, including enforced disappearances, foreign occupation, mass forced displacement, restrictions on humanitarian aid, conflict-related human trafficking and the destruction of civilian infrastructure. There can be no tolerance for such acts. Combating impunity and strengthening both international and national justice responses are critically important in that regard.

  • Country

    Azerbaijan
  • Extracts

    In resolution 2122 (2013), the Council recalls applicable provisions of international law on the right to reparations for violations of individual rights. It is essential that reparations programmes receive increased recognition and support as a tool for delivering justice and redress for victims and longer-term peace dividends within societies and communities. The contribution of transitional justice measures to rebuilding the rule of law, redress, justice and reconciliation makes such measures equally important tools for furthering women's rights in post-conflict societies.

  • Country

    Czech Rep.
  • Extracts

    The protection of human rights, including the rights of women, belongs to our foreign policy priorities. The Czech Republic takes an active stance in promoting the strengthening and effective realization of the rights of women and in preventing gender-based violence in various multilateral forums. We also raise the issue within the universal periodic review mechanism.

  • Country

    Czech Rep.
  • Extracts

    As part of its human rights promotion activities, the Czech Republic takes into consideration gender aspects and the protection of women in post-conflict situations, as well as in countries in transition, including by supporting projects of Czech and local non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Since 2005, the transition promotion programme of the Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs — a unique financial instrument aimed at democracy assistance — has supported projects of civil society organizations that are working to strengthen democracy, the rule of law and respect for human rights by empowering civil society, including women's organizations, throughout the world.

  • Country

    S. Korea
  • Extracts

    While there has been significant progress in implementing resolution 1325 (2000) over the years, persistent gaps and challenges remain. For far too many women in conflict-affected societies, the mere protection of a woman's basic rights, let alone gender equality, remains a daunting challenge. In Syria, women account for the majority of the casualties and the displaced population. In the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, women continue to be victimized in the conflict. Given this shared concern, I would like to highlight the following four points.

Justice, Rule of Law and Security Sector Reform
  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    And of course Madame Balipou, not only for her remarks and for undertaking an arduous journey to be with us here today, but for advocating with such eloquence on behalf of women's participation, and on behalf of the rule of law, which go very much together, in the Central African Republic and beyond, what you do takes courage, and we commend you for it.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    Today's debate, as we know, focuses on one particular aspect of this linkage, which is the rule of law. That focus is appropriate because the law is diminished in any country where half of the population is denied the chance to shape it.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    Years ago, I bore witness as a journalist to the brutal violence in the Balkans. There, mass rape was used as a tactic of war and the means of accountability had to be created through the International Criminal Tribunal for Former Yugoslavia – but it was created only after tens of thousands of people had already died. We've learned through hard experience that wars are increasingly carried out less by professional troops than by irregular forces – leading to more civilian casualties, economic disruption, and displaced families. During the chaos of armed conflict; legal systems are often bypassed and sexual predators, we found, do their worst.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    This plan is backed by leaders across the U.S. government. President Obama is personally determined to change the DNA of the U.S. government so that this inexorable link between women's inclusion and lasting peace is a premise or an axiom brought to every policy discussion. President Obama and Secretary of State Kerry have ordered its full integration into our diplomacy; the Defense Department is spreading the message of gender awareness to partners across the globe; our Justice Department is working with police, prosecutors, and judges to increase accountability for sexual violence; and the Centers for Disease Control have launched a system for monitoring abuse against women and girls.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    "Because of UN Women and its partners, numerous productive initiatives are underway. These range from peace building efforts by women in Mali to new legal protection measures in Colombia to smoother access to justice in Haiti to the enhanced role for women in the police of Zimbabwe. Women are also playing an important part in preparing for elections in Sierra Leone and in harnessing new communications technology to monitor and report on violations in Sudan and other areas of conflict."

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Lithuania associates itself with the statement made by the representative of the European Union. I will limit myself to a few points relating to the agenda on the rule of law and the participation of women.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Strengthening international and national justice responses to conflict-related violence against women is crucial. In the aftermath of conflict, it is vital to develop transitional justice mechanisms and institutions and to rebuild the rule of law to protect women's rights.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    We must pay greater attention to providing better support for victims, including by ensuring protection for witnesses, victims and justice officials, providing reparation mechanisms and ensuring the systematic inclusion of women in all aspects of conflict resolution. United Nations special representatives, peacekeeping and political missions and United Nations agencies have a much greater role to play.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    In recent years, the United Nations has augmented its involvement in establishing and supporting transitional justice measures, furthering women's rights in post- conflict societies. The United Nations-supported truth commissions in Mali, Kenya and Cote d'Ivoire have addressed gender-based crimes. Yet more must be done to ensure that transitional justice addresses a full range of gender-specific crimes, including human trafficking, early or forced marriages, the links between sexual violence and natural-resource extraction, withholding humanitarian assistance, enforced disappearances and forced displacement.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Transitional justice cannot be a substitute for accountability. It should not limit the access of victims to reparations. Blanket amnesties cannot be extended to conflict-related sexual violence. We must pay greater attention to delivering reparation programmes and funding. We continue to support the wider Council practice of including sexual violence in the designation criteria for targeted sanctions.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Notably greater involvement of women — from mediation, restoring the rule of law and governance to participation in post-conflict electoral processes — continues to require commitment and attention. It also requires greater dedicated resourcing, particularly for civil society groups working on the ground.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    We firmly believe that capacity-building should be a main focus of United Nations efforts. In order to ensure sustainable peace and stability, State institutions, including in the area of security, the rule of law and justice, need to be strengthened. National Governments have the primary responsibility for prosecuting and deterring violence against women, including sexual violence. As affected States re-embark on the process of rebuilding their countries, including by consolidating democratic ideals and practices and making effective improvements to socioeconomic conditions, the United Nations and the international community must step up and sustain their support to them.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    We firmly believe that capacity-building should be a main focus of United Nations efforts. In order to ensure sustainable peace and stability, State institutions, including in the area of security, the rule of law and justice, need to be strengthened. National Governments have the primary responsibility for prosecuting and deterring violence against women, including sexual violence. As affected States re-embark on the process of rebuilding their countries, including by consolidating democratic ideals and practices and making effective improvements to socioeconomic conditions, the United Nations and the international community must step up and sustain their support to them.

  • Speaker

    NATO
  • Extracts

    NATO's overall purpose is to safeguard the freedom and security of all its members by political and military means. The Alliance is not defined by the threats we face, rather it is defined by the values we share. We are united by the principles of individual liberty, democracy, human rights and the rule of law.

  • Speaker

    NATO
  • Extracts

    NATO fully recognizes the need to ensure access to justice for all, and we recognize the challenges that occur when the rule of law breaks down in a conflict situation and when there is no equality before the law. We do not have individual liberty if women cannot decide for themselves; we do not have democracy if women cannot participate; we do not respect human rights if women's rights are not respected; and there is no rule of law if women do not have access to justice.

  • Speaker

    NATO
  • Extracts

    The overall responsibility for ensuring the rule of law and equality before the law rests with nations, but the role of international law in setting standards and ensuring accountability is also very important. Real gains have been made in developing the international legal frameworks and institutions to secure accountability and justice for war crimes and crimes against humanity.

  • Speaker

    NATO
  • Extracts

    NATO is exploring how we, as a politico-military regional organization, can best, within our role and responsibilities, prepare and assist in supporting the rule of law and gender equality through our activities. For example, under ISAF, we have been running a Rule of Law Field Support Mission to support and enable Afghan officials and international organizations in their rule of law efforts.

  • Speaker

    NATO
  • Extracts

    In September, all NATO allies fully subscribed to the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict. It is highlighted, both in that Declaration and in resolution 2106 (2013), that the collection of data and the documentation of sexual and gender-based violence in armed conflict can be instrumental in bringing perpetrators to justice and in ensuring justice for survivors.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    We recognize the importance of women having unfettered access to justice in conflict and post- conflict settings, including through gender-responsive legal, judicial and security-sector reform and other mechanisms. Access to justice for women in conflict and post-conflict settings through conscious policies of inclusion is essential to building fair, equitable and just societies. Women suffer disproportionately from poverty, and the risks they face are heightened in armed conflict and post-conflict settings.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Women's legal status and rights must be ensured in post-conflict situations. Strengthening the legal framework to address issues of discrimination against women with respect to land ownership, access to economic opportunity and employment, education and health care is an essential component of gender- responsive peacebuilding architecture.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Justice for victims of serious violations of international law is an essential requirement for sustainable peace, security and the development for States emerging from armed conflict, where the rule of law must enjoy primacy and be unscrupulously upheld. My delegation therefore supports efforts by the Council to continue fighting impunity for the most serious crimes committed against women and girls, through the work of the International Criminal Court, ad hoc and mixed tribunals, as well as specialized chambers in national tribunals.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    My delegation appreciates the commendable work undertaken by the Team of Experts on the Rule of Law and Sexual Violence in Conflict. However, we remain of the view that significantly more needs to be done by Member States, the United Nations system and the relevant entities in supporting national efforts by States to increase women's participation, leadership and expertise in the rule of law and transitional justice, as well as in advancing accountability measures for serious offences committed against women and children.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    I would like to commend the United Nations team of experts on the rule of law and sexual violence for their valuable work.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    We welcome the fact that the international community has been paying increasing attention to the crime of sexual violence in conflict. The Security Council has hosted many debates on the issue and addressed the crucial issues of transitional justice, capacity-building and the rule of law. International and regional organizations are devoting more attention to thistopic.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    However, despite all those efforts, sexual violence in armed conflict remains one of the most neglected crimes. Sadly, the situation in Syria, just across our border, is a vivid example of that. Turkey echoes the condemnation voiced very recently by the Council of the acts of sexual and gender-based violence and abuse taking place in Syria. However, as we most regretfully know, a culture of impunity tends to prevail in conflicts and in post- conflict situations. Violators are not adequately punished, if punished at all. Victims lack sufficient access to justice, physical and psychological treatment or support. Those suffering sexual violence often find it difficult to speak out, especially in situations of prolonged conflict.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    Today's debate serves to highlight the strong will power of the international community to combat sexual violence in conflict. Now is time to focus on the ways and means to do so by sharing best practices and talking about specific measures that can be adopted. In that sense, we find the focus of today's debate on the rule of law and transitional justice in conflict and post-conflict situations extremely useful, and would like to thank the Azerbaijani presidency for convening it.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    The elimination of the root causes of conflict is the best way to prevent sexual violence and to address impunity. Combating impunity is possible only by building transparent, effective, non-discriminatory and functioning institutions and justice systems. It is vital to ensure that women and girls have access to judicial institutions and proper representation. We in the international community should pursue our efforts to support gender-sensitive judicial reform and capacity- building. It is important to provide gender expertise in peacekeeping operations and peacebuilding efforts, as well as to ensure the participation of women in those efforts.

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    Although we still hear that violence is as old as war itself and that women's bodies have been a battlefield for centuries throughout the world, the experience in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Rwanda served to scuttle the cynical acceptance of sexual violence as a natural phenomenon in armed conflicts, and of rape as a weapon of war of devastating power. The atrocities documented at the time and the survivors' testimonies of massive violations — rapes in camps, mutilations, sexual slavery and forced pregnancies — moved humankind's ethical consciousness, while sexual violence in armed conflicts seized being an invisible crime or an immutable tradition. The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the Special Court for Sierra Leone decisively made progress in classifying sexual violence, in particular rape in conflict situations, as torture, a war crime and a crime against humanity. With complete clarity, the International Criminal Court Statute would subsequently establish that acts of rape, sexual slavery, prostitution, forced pregnancy or sterilization or any other form of sexual violence of comparable severity constitute war crimes and crimes against humanity.

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    In accordance with that progressive increase in awareness, the Security Council's trajectory shows an awareness and increasing commitment to preventing and eradicating sexual and gender-based discrimination in situations of conflict and post-conflict situations, as well as a commitment to ensuring that when sexist crimes are committed, the perpetrators will not enjoy impunity, that there is justice and redress for the victims and that societies can achieve a lasting peace based on authentic reconciliation that is born of an understanding of the truth and a recognition of the fact that nobody has the right to deny another human being of their life, their freedom or their dignity, nor can they impede their participation by way of any type of discrimination in any area of society.

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    "From resolution 1208 (1998), on security for refugees, which underscores the special security needs of women in camps, to resolution 1314 (2000), which underscores the importance of prevention, disarmament, demobilization and reintegration policies including a gender perspective, it is clear we have made progress. However, it was particularly through resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions focused on the situation of women in conflict and post-conflict situations that the Council underscored, as priorities in achieving lasting peace, the promotion and protection of women's human rights and their equal participation in transitional justice and reconciliation processes, as well as a human rights perspective and a gender perspective in all the efforts and programmes for development, peace, security and the building and strengthening of the rule of law."

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    "It is true that much remains to be done. Despite all the progress made — as we recently noted in our visit to the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Great Lakes region — weak States, authoritarian Governments, corrupt systems and a widespread culture of impunity serve to perpetuate inequality and violence against women in conf lict and post-conf lict situations, and that enables other types of inequality, discrimination and violence to exist in society. We have worked very hard to put an end to rape as a weapon of war and to the wrongful response of impunity for its perpetrators. While those efforts have contributed to reducing impunity's
    negative effects, we are aware that the problem has still not been eradicated."

  • Country

    Argentina
  • Extracts

    "We cannot lock ourselves inside a laboratory to restore and recognize women's human rights or to build a genuine rule of law. In that connection, I would like to end with the testimony of women from various parts of the world. In this century, in one country in Africa, 1,152 women were raped every day — that is 48 every hour or four every five minutes. In another area of that continent, a woman reported that, when women tried to escape, their children were killed. She said that they raped lots of women and girls and were happy when they raped them. They even sang while they raped them and told them they had the right to do whatever they wish with women. In another country, a women's organization told us that the criminal code there still interprets rape as a form of adultery. If a women cannot prove that there was no consent and if there are not at least four witnesses who confirm her testimony, women are punished for adultery by whipping or stoning. In a country in Asia, we heard recently from a group of women who were subjected to sexual torture. Their genitals were burned, they said. They were forced into prostitution by security forces, rebel groups and members of peacekeeping missions. In Europe, a women from the former Yugoslavia testified that in the camps the soldiers raped her all day long. She would fall asleep, but when she awoke a different soldier would be in her bed."

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    Mr President, Australia welcomes Azerbaijan bringing the Council's focus to the critical intersection between the rule of law and transitional justice, and the women, peace and security agenda. I thank the Secretary- General, and the High Commissioner for Human Rights, Ms Pillay for their determined efforts. And Ms Brigitte Balipou for inspiring struggle on the frontlines. And I welcome Madame Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, as the new Executive Director of UN Women – we look forward to receiving regular briefings from her and other senior UN officials on the gender dimensions of conflict and across the thematic work on our agenda. It is integral to our work that you regularly provide such input. Thirteen years ago, Security Council resolution 1325 recognised the central role of women to the maintenance of international peace and security. But as the Secretary-General's report makes clear, while there has been some progress, typically the linkages between women's participation and the work of the Council are not made. The consistent inclusion in mission mandates of women, peace and security objectives, is fundamental to addressing this.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    Local justice remains critical to the long-term healing and the reconciliation of communities, and affected States need to ensure accountability for conflict-related crimes. But to be effective, this must include justice for crimes of sexual violence. Fifteen years since the Rome Statute included sexual and gender- based offences as crimes against humanity and war crimes the inclusion of such offences in transitional justice arrangements must be mainstreamed. From prosecutions, to truth commissions, to reparations programs, effective transitional justice mechanisms must incorporate the situation of women.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    In post-conflict settings, women's full and effective participation is fundamental to efforts to rebuild the justice sector and to security sector reform. In Solomon Islands for example, Australia supported, through the Participating Police Force, the post-conflict recruitment and retention of female officers to the local police force. The early involvement of women, and the integration of a gender-perspective, led directly to the establishmen to critical domestic violence and sexual abuse services. More fundamentally, it also underwrote the broader processes of community rebuilding.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    In post-conflict settings, women's full and effective participation is fundamental to efforts to rebuild the justice sector and to security sector reform. In Solomon Islands for example, Australia supported, through the Participating Police Force, the post-conflict recruitment and retention of female officers to the local police force. The early involvement of women, and the integration of a gender-perspective, led directly to the establishmen to critical domestic violence and sexual abuse services. More fundamentally, it also underwrote the broader processes of community rebuilding.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    Chile thanks Azerbaijani the presidency for convening this open debate on women and peace and security, and for the opportunity to reaffirm the role of women in transitional justice.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    We agree with the recommendations in the report about the need to promote sustainable budgets for the work, so as to strengthen women's organizations working at the national levels and to train women leaders of peace movements. While appreciating the work of the experts deployed in the field, we consider it essential to provide training at the system and national levels not only for those providing direct leadership in that area, but also to those performing management functions, whatever their role. My delegation agrees on the need to accelerate women's access to the political arena and to support transitional justice reform as a peacebuilding guarantee.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    That and other crises demonstrate the urgent need to act. This morning, we heard an eye-witness account on the Central African Republic. We have heard that the situation is tragic, encompassing sexual violence, forced disappearances, recruitment of child soldiers and, increasingly, religiously motivated violence. The precarious situation of women is shocking. The Council should remain apprised of the issue. Not only must we take the situation of women into account; beyond that, to the extent that the tragic situation of women in the Central African Republic is only part of the broader tragedy of the entire country, we must re-establish security, peace and the rule of law there. France voted in favour of resolution 2118 (2013) in that regard and will stay the course, including, if necessary, by proposing a peacekeeping operation in that country.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    Justice remains the cornerstone of stabilization in post-conflict situations. National Governments of course have the primary responsibility for prosecuting and punishing those resposible for sexual violence. However, when States fail to live up to their responsibilities, the International Criminal Court should be able to play its full role. The Court is already at work in the Central African Republic, in Mali and in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. France believes that the Court should be seized of the matter in Syria — as has now been amply justified. I should like to underscore here that all those responsible for violence against the Syrian people must one day be accountable before justice.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    To make the fight against impunity tangible, access for women to the justice system is essential. Since 2011, in cooperation with UN Women, France has had in place a programme for strengthening women's access to justice in Afghanistan. In the framework of its plan of action, France has committed to a cooperation programme in Africa and in the Arab world, working in partnership with UN Women. We have recently specifically allocated support for programmes in Mali being implemented by local non-governmental organizations (NGOs), with a view to supporting the participation of women in political processes. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, we have similarly allocated more than €2 million to support Congolese NGOs to fight against sexual violence, strengthen the participation of women in decision-making processes and help women integrate on the socioeconomic level. In that spirit, next December France will organize in Paris a summit on peace and security in Africa, which will provide an opportunity for all to express and reaffirm their commitment to bringing about support for resolutions on women and peace and security.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    We view this open debate as an opportunity to highlight the policies and programmes aimed at supporting national ownership and reform of justice systems that place women's rights and access to justice for women at their heart. As the recent declaration of the Peacebuilding Commission on women's economic empowerment for peacebuilding underscores, societies that invest in women see exponential dividends from such investments. We believe that justice sector reform must start with the reform of laws to ensure that women have equal rights in all spheres. It must include reforms to strengthen women's access to the justice system and to promote and protect their rights and to protect women from the violence and insecurity that too often accompany transitions from conflict.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    Transitional justice mechanisms and reparations programmes in particular have an important role in and impact on societies recovering from conflict. When linked to development efforts, such measures can have sustainable and transformative impacts for victims, and for women victims in particular. The transitions that follow conflicts present important opportunities not only to address the injustices faced by women during times of conflict, but also to transform underlying inequalities and gender-based discrimination.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    Recently, the United Nations has developed an increasingly sophisticated network for specialized gender experts for deployment to mediation, transitional justice and prosecutorial processes. Member States should avail themselves of these important resources. For example, the regular deployments of UN Women to commissions of enquiry over the past three years have produced a steady improvement in the extent to which human rights abuses against women are reported and acted upon. This is a direct result of the quality of expertise and the regular deployment of experts to those bodies.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    The rule of law makes available to vulnerable groups, such as women, normative tools that promote their empowerment and emancipation. It is essential to uphold the equal rights of women by ensuring their full participation in governing institutions and the judicial system. We must reaffirm the need to establish a legislative framework that secures their full access to justice.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    Brazil embraces a comprehensive notion of the rule of law that embodies a number of principles and experiences. We are convinced that the rule of law and development are strongly interrelated and mutually reinforcing. The rule of law is intimately connected to the realization of social and economic rights. In that regard, we are proud to celebrate, in 2013, the twenty- fifth year of the Brazilian Constitution, whereby we acknowledged the centrality of social and economic rights in the context of the rule of law and human rights.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    In post-conflict situations, transitional justice can be an important tool to shape a better future for women. In many circumstances, knowing the truth about the violations committed against women is central to achieving national reconciliation. Transitional justice also plays a significant role in ensuring that the permanent justice structure to be established will take the interests of women into account in its foundations.

  • Country

    Egypt
  • Extracts

    Egypt has considered with interest the Secretary- General's report on women and peace and security (S/2013/525). We would like to express our appreciation for the efforts made in the drafting of the report, which highlights the progress made, including the significant policy and operational focus on the monitoring, prevention and prosecution of violence against women in conflicts. In that context, I would like to make the following remarks.

  • Country

    Egypt
  • Extracts

    Secondly, Egypt is deeply concerned about the increasing rates and patterns of violence against women and girls around the world, particularly sexual violence in armed conflicts and post-conflict situations. We stress the indispensable role of transitional justice and the rule of the law for the protection of women's rights and for ensuring accountability and non-impunity for perpetrators, as a key element of conflict-prevention, peacekeeping, conflict-resolution and peacebuilding. Transitional justice measures must address the full range of violations and abuses of women's human rights, including crimes committed by United Nations peacekeeping forces and personnel.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    We welcome the theme of today's debate, with its particular focus on the rule of law and transitional justice during and post-conflict, which have received limited attention to date. Yet the breakdown of the rule of law in conflict leads to a broad range of violations of women's and girls' rights. To address that challenge, post-conflict reforms need to be gender-sensitive and women's access to justice in conflict and post-conflict settings needs to be secured. Women need to be represented in the justice sector.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    The provision of fair, transparent, effective and accountable justice mechanisms for all is crucial to ensuring the benefits of the rule of law for everyone. Women's and girls' rights must be secured; they must also be ensured in informal justice systems. Given the broad range of conflict-related violations of women's rights — including enforced disappearance, early and forced marriage, human trafficking and violations of economic and social rights — transitional justice processes need to address them in full. The EU is now working on establishing its policy on transitional justice. The way justice related issues are addressed in peace negotiations has a strong impact on the pursuit of post-conflict justice and mediators can play an important role in that regard.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    We welcome the comprehensive approach of the report of the Secretary-General (S/2013/525) and particularly welcome the increasingly targeted and concrete recommendations for action. We underline the need for continued regular reporting and briefings to the Council. However, we note the need to further enhance the links between the information provided to the Council and the outcomes of the Council's work, particularly the mandates of the United Nations peace operations. We would also welcome reporting on the rule of law action point of the seven-point action plan on gender-sensitive peacebuilding.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    The European Union supports the work aimed at increasing the role of women in the prevention and resolution of conflicts and in peacebuilding, promoting women's equal participation in all efforts for the promotion of peace and security and providing an integrated approach to prevent and punish acts of sexual violence, as well as to bring justice, services and reparation to its victims.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    In that regard, we acknowledge the important contribution of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court to expanding the scope of gender and sexual-based violence. We encourage States that have not yet done so to ratify the Statute, enact domestic criminal legislation of those atrocious crimes and to routinely and systematically prosecute them as the primary means of ensuring accountability.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    In that context, Indonesia wishes to emphasize the critical importance of sustaining political momentum behind ongoing peacebuilding processes, promoting gender equality and promoting and protecting the human rights of women. We are fully convinced that the involvement of women in all aspects of society unleashes a vast and dynamic pool of ideas, creativity and skills, which inspire society to move on and gain prosperity. Therefore, the promotion and protection of human rights for all, including women in conflict- affected countries, is evidently crucial. Furthermore, the ability of women to exercise their rights and responsibilities will define a successful transition to peace and stability based on the rule of law.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    It is a matter of regret that respecting the rule of law in conflict situations continues to be a significant challenge for the international community. In our view, that is a strong reason for inclusive peace negotiations that produce peace that is durable, sustainable and long- lasting. It is also reason for including the participation and engagement of women in that process. We also believe that national reconciliation, as one tool of transitional justice, must benefit from the active participation of women. Indonesia, in that regard, agrees with the call made by the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations last year that lasting progress on security, national reconciliation, human rights, the rule of law and sustainable development needs to occur in parallel, given the interconnected nature of those challenges in countries emerging from conflict.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    Hard tools, such as sanctions regimes that target perpetrators of sexual violence and appropriately mandated and trained peacekeeping missions, are effective instruments for the protection agenda, but the participation dimension of the women and peace and security agenda still requires targeted action by the Council. Indeed, the Council's role in addressing women's political participation in the peace and security agenda remains a challenge. That makes today's debate on the role of women in transitional justice even more important.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    In June, when the Secretary-General's Special Envoy for the Great Lakes Region, Mary Robinson, made her first statement to the United Nations family in her new role, she spoke of women not as victims but as stakeholders. She questioned the sustainability of any peace that half the population has had no role in building and she called for women to be put at the core of peacebuilding. New Zealand agrees. If it is going to deliver lasting and sustainable peace, then, as the representative of Austria just emphasized, transitional justice must incorporate the entire population. Women's perspectives must be included in the design, implementation and monitoring of transitional justice processes.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    Beyond simply being a just democratic principle, there are many tangible reasons for that. It builds trust in post-conflict justice institutions, and UN Women's research shows that women are more likely to report sexual and gender-based crimes to transitional justice institutions that involve women judges and officials. The Council should also make clear that there must be prominent roles for women, both as leaders and as active participants in the consultative processes that establish transitional arrangements.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    New Zealand's experience, in its own region and beyond is that credible, informal and tradition-based justice systems have a demonstrated role in establishing accountability. In post-conflict societies, it is often informal justice mechanisms that are the most accessible for justice, mediation and conflict resolution. While some informal and traditional systems struggle to adequately address women's needs due to inherent gender biases, examples from Africa show the value of local efforts to transform such institutions in a manner that allows for the full participation for women.

  • Country

    Rwanda
  • Extracts

    At the institutional level, Rwanda's security organs, in collaboration with other Government agencies, local communities and civil society, have launched initiatives to prevent and respond to violence that targets women and girls. The one-stop centres run by the national police offer a wide range of free services for victims of gender-based violence, and we have set up gender desks in police stations and army posts nationwide, and at the national prosecution agency, for the purposes of offering gender-sensitive services to victims.

  • Country

    Rwanda
  • Extracts

    Let me also express my delegation's support for the principle of zero tolerance advocated by the United Nations and call for the principle to be more rigorously enforced. During the 1994 genocide perpetrated against the Tutsi in Rwanda, women and girls were forced to endure inhuman and degrading atrocities. Tens of thousands were raped and left for dead. That memory — that history — inspires Rwanda in its unyielding and heartfelt commitment to fight against impunity, especially when it comes to crimes against women and girls.

  • Country

    Rwanda
  • Extracts

    Rwandans have come to understand first hand the importance of strengthening internal justice mechanisms and building institutions that enhance accessibility to justice. We believe that the fight against impunity is primarily the responsibility of States. The international community, including the United Nations, should support national jurisdictions and help them to build capacity where gaps exist, by providing guidance and direction drawn from best practices in the field. That is not to suggest, however, that those international justice mechanisms are irrelevant; indeed, a political international mechanism or tribunal could complement the work of national jurisdictions in the fight against impunity and bring perpetrators of crimes against humanity and genocide, including crimes against women and girls, to justice.

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    As we all know, violence against women will not end until those who commit and order it are found, arrested, tried and sentenced. The fight against impunity cannot be a matter of mere words; it must see be a commitment by all political actors and parties in a crisis to work to eradicate the culture of violence against women and girls, especially rape, which has for some time been a weapon of war.

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    This issue is at the centre of the majority of Security Council debates, but we are still far from a solution. The United Nations must stress the fight against violence by supporting, through appropriate mechanisms, the Governments of countries in conflict situations or emerging therefrom to address the issues of violence and impunity. We believe that restoring judicial institutions and providing them with more human and financial resources could contribute to deterring serious violations of human rights and to effectively punishing their perpetrators. The adoption of national laws to repress such acts is also necessary. Truth, justice and reconciliation commissions, which have had a positive impact in such processes, must serve as a framework for justice for all — justice that establishes truth and repairs the damage.

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    It goes without saying that the fight against impunity can be waged only in the context of a rule of law that establishes effective transitional justice and promotes the effective participation of victims, including women, in the country's reconstruction. Unfortunately, with regard to participation, the fact is that women have played a minor role, if they have not been totally sidelined, in peace talks and reconciliation and in political and economic activities. As an illustration, in 2012 women comprised fewer than 8 per cent of the members of negotiating delegations in peace processes.

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    Women will not be protected in any lasting way until in-depth legal and judicial reforms are undertaken by countries emerging from armed conflict. Fortunately, a number of countries have undertaken reforms in accordance with the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and other relevant international legal instruments. Clearly, the best way to protect women and fight effectively against the effects of armed conflict on the lives of people in conflict is to take measures to prevent the outbreak of conflicts.

  • Speaker

    African Union
  • Extracts

    Experience has shown that addressing issues of rule of law and transitional justice in those conflict and post- conflict situations has become an urgent and indispensable prerequisite for achieving sustainable peace and stability. Equally important is the need to address the gender dimension and to find ways to tackle issues of rule of law and transitional justice from a gender perspective. In that regard, I wish to join previous speakers in their recommendation of the importance and the content of the resolution 2122 (2013) adopted by the Council today. I wish to thank the Secretary-General for the report (S/2013/525) before us today. I also thank Under- Secretary-General Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director of UN Women; Ms. Navanethem Pillay, United Nations Commissioner for Human Rights; and Ms. Brigitte Balipou of the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security.

  • Speaker

    African Union
  • Extracts

    Despite those notable advances, much more remains to be done on the continent to ensure that justice and accountability for violations, particularly against women, are brought to bear and that redress for the victims is provided in order to ensure that crimes perpetrated against them during conflicts are never repeated.

  • Speaker

    African Union
  • Extracts

    While transitional justice mechanisms and processes are entrenched at the national level, the African Union and subregional bodies continue to play a pivotal role in influencing the adoption and implementation of transitional justice processes on the continent. Indeed, the AU organs have become increasingly involved in negotiating transition in States emerging from conflict and in fashioning approaches to address past human rights atrocities.

  • Speaker

    African Union
  • Extracts

    To that end, the African Union Commission, with the technical support of civil society partners, are leading in the development of the African Union Transitional Justice Policy Framework. The Transitional Justice Policy Framework emerged from the report by the AU Panel of the Wise entitled Non-impunity, truth, peace, justice and reconciliation in Africa: opportunities and constraints. The report interrogates the polarized peace-versus-justice debate that seems to be the focus of international justice discourse in Africa, while seeking to offer a middle ground and an African regional perspective that takes into account the complexities and nuances within the African context, including continental approaches to non-impunity, truth, peace, justice and reconciliation in Africa. The report of the Panel of Wise also concludes that the AU has a sound track record of pronouncements and engagement related to addressing impunity in Africa, in spite of some challenges of coherence and coordination in implementation.

  • Speaker

    African Union
  • Extracts

    The African Union looks forward to the adoption of the policy framework and remains convinced that this document will be make a significant contribution to “comprehensively promote justice and accountability in ways that further the equal rights of women and the right to equal participation in decision-making” (S/2013/587, annex, p. 2).

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    We agree that the nexus between the rule of law and women and peace and security needs our further attention. In the aftermath of conflict, transitional justice mechanisms must be victim-centred and gender-sensitive in order to ensure that the rights of victims, in particular women and children, are fully respected. Legal, institutional and social obstacles to women's access to formal and informal justice systems must be more energetically addressed, and in that context gender-sensitive reforms should receive more attention. Reparation programmes for gross human rights violations contribute to the reconciliation of divided societies, in which financial reparations potentially have an important impact on enhancing the economic security of women, including war widows, in the aftermath of conflict. Reparations should also be targeted to victims of sexual and gender-based violence.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    The Security Council has clearly recognized its own role in ending impunity for serious violations of international humanitarian and human-rights law, and has acknowledged the full range of justice and reconciliation mechanisms, including in resolution 1894 (2009). In that context, we would like to stress the important role of the International Criminal Court and other international criminal tribunals in the fight against impunity, and we welcome the first investigations of cases of sexual violence before those courts.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    A central element of our understanding of the rule of law is that it not only guarantees women's equal rights but necessarily implies women's equal participation in political and public life, as well as their economic empowerment. While the full, equal and meaningful participation of women in all conflict prevention, resolution and peacebuilding efforts is at the heart of resolution 1325 (2000) and should be self- evident 13 years after its adoption, there is no reason for complacency.

  • Country

    Belgium
  • Extracts

    Belgium welcomes the theme chosen for today's debate. We also sponsored resolution 2122 (2013), adopted today. The rule of law and transitional justice in relation to gender have not yet received sufficient attention, despite the fact that they are key to the promotion and protection of women's rights in post- conflict situations. My country welcomes the fact that this debate is also focusing on the rebuilding of justice mechanisms that guarantee women non-discriminatory access to justice in post-conflict societies.

  • Country

    Belgium
  • Extracts

    Indeed, improving the legal framework and the rules of procedure to ensure women better access to justice at both the national and the international levels is one of the aims of the second national action plan for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) that my country recently finalized for the period 2013-2016. To attain that goal, we believe that it is critical, on the one hand, to support the initiatives that facilitate access to justice for women and girls so as to ensure that their rights are protected, and, on the other, to incorporate the gender dimension into documents relating to the rule of law and transitional justice and to support transitional justice mechanisms that have a real impact on gender parity.

  • Country

    Belgium
  • Extracts

    Belgium continues to give political and operational priority to the fight against all forms of violence against civilians during and after armed conflict, with particular focus on sexual violence. In that regard, my country encourages States to include the fight against sexual violence in their transitional justice mechanisms and penal law, and to consider the fight against sexual violence as their responsibility. We also reiterate our call on all countries to apply the broadest possible definition of the concept of sexual violence, as identified by the International Criminal Court.

  • Country

    Belgium
  • Extracts

    Spain welcomes the fact that the Security Council has devoted three debates this year, with different approaches, to the women and peace and security agenda. The adoption of resolution 2122 (2013) today and of resolution 2106 (2013) in June consolidates a doctrinal and legal corpus that reflects the will of Member States to move from dialogue to action.

  • Country

    Belgium
  • Extracts

    Regarding accountability and the fight against impunity, the international community's efforts in that field should be recalled. That was highlighted during the Council debate of 24 June 2013 on impunity for crimes of sexual violence in conflicts (S/PV.6984) and the subsequent adoption of resolution 2106 (2013), which reiterates the importance of vigorously continuing to establish accountability for the most serious crimes committed against women and girls in conflict. On that issue, I would like to stress the need to address impunity for crimes committed against those who tend to be particularly discriminated against, such as women and girls with disabilities or indigenous women and girls.

  • Country

    Belgium
  • Extracts

    Spain has actively contributed to such discussions in many forums in which such questions have been addressed and will continue to do so as long as the effective prosecution of those responsible for such crimes persists as a global challenge requiring urgent and priority attention.

  • Country

    Belgium
  • Extracts

    With regard to full participation in establishing the rule of law, which means placing women at the centre of the decision-making processes in the post-conflict rebuilding phase, while giving particular attention to justice and security sector reform. Spain believes that that is the only way to end the discrimination that makes women suffer disproportionate violations of their rights during conflicts. It also enhances safeguards to ensure that such discrimination is not repeated.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Conflicts create situations in which women and children are the ones most affected by the deterioration of living conditions and fundamental rights. Violence and the deprivation of rights often go hand in hand with conflict. Efforts to fight impunity, provide assistance to victims and hold perpetrators accountable must be intensified and better coordinated. Regrettably, sexual and gender-based violence often continue after peace deals are reached, due to insufficient investment in protection and prevention strategies, or weak security and justice institutions. We are aware of the fact that peace cannot be sustained unless women play a critical role in the process. We therefore underscore the importance of the full and effective involvement of women at all stages of peace processes and of giving them an equal role in the prevention and resolution of conflicts, as well as in early peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    We affirm our commitment to the rule of law as an imperative for political dialogue and cooperation. In that regard, with the aim of improving the overall situation of women victims of rape, we are making efforts to finalize the drafting of a programme for victims of rape, sexual abuse and torture in Bosnia and Herzegovina for the period 2013-2016. At the State level, a draft transitional justice strategy has been developed to create an acceptable platform for efficient and realistic mechanisms and activities to correct the injustices and heal the traumas resulting from the armed conflict in the 1990s.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    Estonia is dedicated to protecting and promoting human rights and fundamental freedoms, both nationally and internationally. As a member of the Human Rights Council, our particular focus is on the rights of women and children, gender perspective in conflict settlements and the fight against impunity. Estonia firmly believes that the rule of law in conflict and post-conflict situations must promote justice and accountability in ways that further the rights of women, including through legal and institutional reforms that are gender sensitive. The equal right to decision-making and participation, along with women's empowerment, is crucial to ensure a functioning society and peace and justice in the aftermath of conflicts.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    Additionally, as stated in the Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525), women's representation in the justice sector plays a significant role in increasing the reporting of crimes and enhancing public trust in the rule of law institutions. The importance of prevention must likewise be stressed. By enabling women to fully participate in judicial systems, we can better tackle the root causes of impunity for violence against women.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    Estonia welcomes the call by the Security Council in today's resolution to Member States to comply with their relevant obligations to end impunity and to thoroughly investigate and prosecute persons responsible for atrocity crimes. Estonia further agrees with the Council that the fight against impunity for the most serious crimes of international concern against women and girls has been strengthened through the work of the International Criminal Court (ICC), the ad hoc and mixed tribunals, and the specialized chambers in national tribunals. ICC prosecutions will not, however, be sufficient to ensure complete accountability. Therefore, it is essential that the gender provisions of the Rome Statute are translated into national prosecutions.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    Justice for victims of atrocity crimes, however, entails more than just punishing perpetrators. The Rome Statute further empowers victims by its broad victim- participation scheme and underlines its commitment to victims by its reparations provisions. Likewise, the ICC Trust Fund for Victims has been doing important work to alleviate the suffering of victims in the countries where the Court is conducting investigations.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    Estonia was honoured to join the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict during the General Assembly's opening week. We were also glad to see how much interest there was in the topic of enhancing accountability for sexual violence in conflict, discussed at a side event during that week that focused on the role of the ICC and that was hosted by the Estonian Mission to the United Nations. We would like to commend the important work of the Team of Experts on Rule of Law and Sexual Violence in Conflict, and I am glad to note that Estonia has made financial contributions to the activities of the Team.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Transitional justice and the rule of law are crucial elements for the prevention and solution of conflicts. We therefore very much welcome the theme of today's debate, which emphasizes the importance of gender- sensitive systems. Women need to be part of all truth and justice commissions, and women's concerns need to be addressed in those fact-finding bodies. At the same time, perpetrators of violence, crimes and human rights violations need to be held accountable for their actions. That is the most promising way to promote lasting reconciliation. Germany has supported several projects in Rwanda and Burundi to train female police officers on the prevention and investigation of sexual and gender-based violence. In Cambodia and Uganda, Germany has supported the access of women to the justice system through legal and psychosocial counseling.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Secondly, 43 countries have adopted national action plans on women, peace and security. That is an important first step. However, any progress on the ground depends on the political will to abide by those commitments. The German national action plan, which was adopted last year, covers the four focus areas set out in resolution 1325 (2000) and additionally includes the areas of preparation for peace missions and the prosecution of crimes. The implementation of the action plan is monitored by an inter-ministerial working group in collaboration with representatives from civil society. German diplomatic missions abroad have been instructed to support the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), for example by advocating for the inclusion of women in local crisis prevention, conflict management and post-conflict peacebuilding or by supporting gender-sensitive projects on the ground.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    While it is crucial to address sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict contexts, it is equally important to combat impunity and strengthen both international and national justice responses to those crimes. Consequently, capacity-building related to the rule of law, that is wide in scope and goes beyond traditional areas of law reform and strengthening of justice and law enforcement institutions are necessary.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    The rule of law should address justice, equality and equity with a strong focus on the empowerment of women and girls, gender equality, and preventing and combating violence against women as essential preconditions for equitable and inclusive sustainable development. In that context, we praise the work of the United Nations in assisting Member States to address rule of law issues in conflict contexts and we consider it vital that the United Nations continues to emphasize the importance of providing redress and assistance to victims in conflict, post-conflict and other crisis situations.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    To ensure genuine rule of law, beyond the formal establishment of institutions, judicial systems need to be fully accessible to all individuals and groups. A major obstacle to access is the cost involved in legal advice and legal representation services. We support the work of the United Nations to implement a wide variety of projects focused on providing legal aid to address that obstacle.

  • Country

    Guatemala
  • Extracts

    Although so far the Council has held seven debates on the issue of the rule of law, there is still a way to go to achieve overall accountability for crimes affecting women and girls. Nor have we made sufficient progress in achieving women's full participation in the processes of transitional justice. Similarly, there is room to improve the analysis of sex-differentiated effects on women and girls when the rule of law is violated during and after conflicts.

  • Country

    Guatemala
  • Extracts

    We have previously said that, based on our own experience, the boundaries between peacebuilding, peacekeeping and economic, social and legal transformations are not clear. Therefore, we think it is of the utmost importance to advance the fight against impunity, improve access to justice for women and strengthen the justice system infrastructure to deal with such crimes, both nationally and internationally. With regard to our own country, we have adopted legislation on femicide and established courts for the prosecution of that crime, as well as justice centres for onsite legal, judicial and medical services, including psychosocial support for women and their children. We agree with the Secretary-General's recommendation that we must step up efforts to meet and fund the recovery needs of women and girls, especially those who have become heads of households.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    My delegation supports the initiatives of the Team of Experts on the Rule of Law and Sexual Violence in Conflict to assist States in strengthening the rule of law, transitional justice and security sector reform. My delegation also supports the elaboration by the Standing Committee on Women, Peace and Security of the strategic framework intended to assist Member States in achieving their interim objectives, in preparation for the meeting planned for 2015 on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) at national, regional and international levels.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    To take just one example: the OSCE promotes gender balance in its work with judicial personnel because we believe that diversity has a positive impact on women's access to justice and the perceived legitimacy of the judiciary. From a substantive perspective our Mission to Bosnia and Herzegovina supports the integration of a gender perspective into war crimes trial monitoring by providing specific training for civil society on how to monitor conflict-related sexual violence cases and understand the specific challenges that witnesses and victims face in these processes. Trial monitors are then better prepared to gather data on how these cases progress through the judicial system and to advocate for policy improvements based on the data. This is one step in ensuring that justice and accountability is equally pursued for all violations and crimes, regardless of their nature or the sex of the victim.

  • Country

    Pakistan
  • Extracts

    "The rule of law is one of the key elements in the promotion of the agenda on women and peace and security. Gender-responsive transitional justice and reform of the justice and security sectors are prerequisites for promoting and protecting women's rights in conflict and post-conflict situations. The rule of law and transitional justice should continue to be developed so as to protect the rights of women in such situations. The emphasis should be on addressing the root causes of conflicts. Chronic conflicts and relapses into conflict blight some societies, countries and regions and keep them in a state of perpetual instability. The resolution of conflicts is, therefore, the best way to promote and protect the rights and interests of women in conflict situations. We must harness all our resources to prevent and resolve conflicts."

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    For over a decade now, resolution 1325 (2000) has clearly confirmed its vital role and importance in strengthening the role of women in the prevention and settlement of armed conflicts and during post- conflict reconstruction, as well as in their protection during such conflicts. Unfortunately, despite numerous efforts, women continue to fall victim to various forms of violence. That is why we believe that more attention needs to be given to all categories of such crimes. Such a balanced approach is enshrined in resolution 1325 (2000). Cases of women and children being killed and getting injured are a cause for serious concern, including as a result of the indiscriminate or excessive use of force. We think it is unacceptable to simply turn a blind eye to such crimes or to justify them as so-called inevitable acts of collateral damage, which contradicts provisions in the Geneva Conventions.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    Throughout the world security and justice systems fail women time and time again. In conflict and post- conflict settings when institutions break down and violence is rampant, existing injustices are often exacerbated.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    Rebuilding justice and the rule of law is fundamental to protecting women's equal rights and creating a more stable, secure and just society.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    As the Secretary-General has highlighted, women's representation in the justice sector is crucial and helps increase the reporting of crimes. Barriers must be removed so that women can access justice in formal and traditional settings. For example, we have seen success through the use of mobile courts in the Democratic Republic of Congo and paralegal support groups in Nepal. In addition, the most basic needs must be provided for, from access to safe public transportation to the effective delivery of services like water and electricity, as Ms Balipou so eloquently highlighted in her statement earlier.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    The United Kingdom has established a Team of Experts on the Rule of Law. This Team which includes lawyers, gender advisors and experts in the protection of victims and witnesses provides training and mentoring to national authorities to help them develop appropriate laws and build their capabilities. The teams also worked on the frontline with grassroots organisations, local peace builders and human rights defenders. They have already been deployed to the Syrian borders, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Libya, Mali and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

  • Country

    Belarus
  • Extracts

    Belarus condemns all forms of violence, including in conflict situations, particularly against the most vulnerable segments of society — women and children. As with any other country, Belarus has zero tolerance for that scourge. Security Council resolutions, including resolution 2106 (2013) adopted in June, have created a clear legal framework for responding to sexual violence in conflict and prohibited its use as a weapon of war.

  • Country

    Belarus
  • Extracts

    We believe that a thorough investigation of all acts of sexual violence and the immediate punishment of perpetrators are crucial in combatting this scourge. That violence can be eliminated only through coherent collective efforts by the international community — Member States, international organizations and civil society. Such efforts can and should be carried out through a genuine partnership based on a unified approach, respect for each other's views and agreement on the steps to be taken.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Thirdly, strengthening the rule of law represents both an important link in post-conflict peacebuilding efforts and an important foundation for safeguarding and upholding women's rights and interests. To prevent women from once again falling prey to various atrocities, it is essential to ensure their equal participation in the process of reforming the security and justice sectors, while maintaining parallel progress on the tracks of the rule of law, political and economic development and national reconciliation, thus providing a comprehensive guarantee for the respect and protection of women's rights and interests.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    Fortunately, as the report of the Secretary- General of 4 September (S/2013/525) acknowledges, times of transition and flux can present opportunities to strengthen women's leadership, empowerment and rights in the process of restoring the rule of law and governance systems. As his report indicates, the participation of women in peace negotiations and donor conferences has increased over the past year. Active support for such participation, which is being provided by gender experts and women's civil society organizations, is growing, and some peace agreements have included gender-sensitive language. That is encouraging. Yet the progress being made is hard fought and uneven.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    In order to protect women's rights and ensure women's participation in conflict-affected situations, security for those who serve to uphold the rule of law, such as police officers and judges, is a basic necessity. In that regard, gender-responsive transitional justice measures and justice system reforms need to be addressed. In particular, women's access to the justice system must be strengthened so as to protect their rights, as well as to protect them from the violence that too often accompanies the transition from conflict. To that end, Japan has, for example, supported various efforts to assist victims of sexual violence in refugee camps located in such countries as the Sudan, Somalia and Iraq, by providing legal advice, representation and awareness-raising campaigns, as well as establishing relief and recovery systems that include mental health care.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    Justice in times of armed conflict or in post- conflict situations does not fundamentally differ from justice in times of peace. The objective of justice is always to come to a decision with regard to a wrong committed by one individual to the detriment of another: to ascertain its severity, to impose punishment and, where necessary, to order reparations. However, in specific cases of conflict or post-conflict situations, justice often operates, but imperfectly. The victims must overcome additional and very different obstacles from those in peacetime. For women, those obstacles can be truly crippling. For them, justice is often beyond reach, whether for legal, security or social reasons — without taking into account the fact that in post-conflict situations the judiciary itself is often ill- prepared to face the specific situations of women who have suffered the violence of war.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    In that context, one cannot but emphasize the importance of transitional justice. Not only does it allow the possibility to redress past wrongs, but it also affords an opportunity to transform women's situations, thereby guaranteeing lasting peace in a more egalitarian society. The participation of women at all levels and in a timely manner is indispensable to guarantee that the new society that emerges from the rubble of war will grant women their rightful place with the full enjoyment of all their rights.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    It is therefore essential that women be heard during peace processes and that they be involved in security sector and justice sector reforms. In a word, women must be full-fledged stakeholders rather than just spectators of reconstruction and peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    Of all violations afflicting women in conflict situations, sexual violence, which constitutes a direct attack against physical integrity, unavoidably comes to mind when one speaks of transitional justice and the issue of reparations. It is indeed difficult to imagine a society claiming to be fair and respectful of women's rights when thousands of survivors of sexual violence are denied their rights to see the perpetrators of that violence brought to justice. However, in many cases, post- conflict justice ignores the case of those women, often because it does not possess either the necessary expertise or the necessary resources to tackle the task.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    Luxembourg backs the partnership between the intergovernmental Justice Rapid Response and UN Women. In cooperation with the Institute for International Criminal Investigations, that partnership has made it possible to establish a list of specialized experts on the investigation of acts of sexual violence. In that way, experts can be rapidly deployed as required. UN Women has already resorted to using such experts to assist the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights in numerous commissions of inquiry. Experts have also lent their assistance to the International Criminal Court. Luxembourg will continue to support that initiative, which reinforces both responsibility and the transitional justice process.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    Malaysia remains concerned about sexual and gender-based crimes and strongly believes that ending impunity is crucial in our quest to put an end to sexual violence in times of conflict. We note that progress has been made over the years, and we welcome the continuing work of the United Nations and other stakeholders, including the Team of Experts on the Rule of Law and Sexual Violence in Conflict, which focuses its efforts on strengthening the capacity of the national rule of law and justice actors. We feel that the Team's engagement with relevant Governments would strengthen their capacity to effectively address sexual violence against women and girls.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    In our effort to secure peace and security, we must move urgently to replace the prevailing culture of impunity with one that promotes the rule of law, justice and accountability. Underlining the importance of ending sexual violence, Malaysia is pleased to report that it has joined many others in endorsing the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict, which makes clear the collective view on the need of greater action to address the issue.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    My delegation is concerned with the often inadequate legal frameworks on women's rights in post-conflict countries. In that matter, we could take a page from the lessons learned through established courts, such as the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and the International Criminal Tribunal of the Former Yugoslavia, which offer insightful lessons from the prosecution of sexual and gender-based crimes. Those could be applied to future tribunals and domestic judicial processes. Furthermore, Governments that have experienced conflict could consider allocating greater financial resources to investigate cases of sexual violence. There is also a need to ensure that international and national courts have adequate expertise. In that regard, countries in a position to do so should render assistance to post-conflict societies.

  • Country

    Thailand
  • Extracts

    We are pleased that the Council has convened an open debate on this issue for the third time, which signals the importance the Council attaches to the issue of women. Women account for more than half of the world's population. Women's participation and the recognition of their special needs are essential. The issue of women and peace and security is multifaceted. We welcome today's discussion, which focuses on the role of women in transitional justice and the rule of law.

  • Country

    Thailand
  • Extracts

    A situation of conflict creates particular challenges in terms of human rights and upholding the rule of law. As is rightly mentioned by the Secretary-General in his report, rebuilding justice and the rule of law and enhancing gender-sensitive legal and institutional reform, in conformity with international standards, is crucial to protecting women's equal and inviolable rights in the aftermath of conflict. Measures to protect women victims and to redress wrongs against them and bring perpetrators to justice deserve particular attention from the Security Council and the cooperation of the international community.

  • Country

    Thailand
  • Extracts

    My delegation is pleased to learn from UN Women that transitional justice mechanisms are increasingly responding to war crimes against women by providing specific arrangements to protect women witnesses. We also welcome the adoption of resolution 2106 (2013), in June, which focuses on accountability for perpetrators of sexual violence in conflict and stresses women's political and economic empowerment. Those mechanisms need to be effectively utilized. The Council's resolutions and presidential statements also need to be translated into actions if we are to be successful in our attempt to protect women.

  • Country

    Thailand
  • Extracts

    Just last month, Thailand joined other like-minded countries in endorsing the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict, initiated by the United Kingdom. We will continue to cooperate with all partners to eliminate sexual violence in conflict and bring the perpetrators to justice.

  • Country

    Thailand
  • Extracts

    Enhancing women's access to justice is also one of Thailand's main priorities. Our Independent National Rule of Law Commission helps ensure that all State organs perform their duties based on the rule of law, without discrimination. The Council may be interested to know that on 15 November Thailand will host the Bangkok Dialogue on the Rule of Law: Investing in the Rule of Law, Justice and Security for the Post-2015 Development Agenda. This meeting is yet another example of Thailand's commitment to help promote the rule of law, justice and security. Our decision to co-sponsor resolution 2122 (2013) and all our efforts are based on our strong belief that the rule of law at the national and international levels is an indispensable foundation for a more peaceful, prosperous and just world.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    Canada firmly believes that the participation of women in all decision-making processes, particularly those related to the prevention and resolution of conflict and the transition to democracy, is a necessary precondition to securing sustainable peace, as is their access to justice and their inclusion in the economic and social lives of their countries and communities. As the Honourable John Baird, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Canada, said in his address to the General Assembly last month:

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    A pervasive culture of impunity continues to be a major challenge in the area of women, peace and security. Accountability, human rights and the rule of law are recognized preconditions for successful political transition and development, but women are too often denied full and equal access to justice. States must offer effective and universally accessible national judicial systems and provide all victims with support, protection and redress. The needs of vulnerable groups, such as women with disabilities and indigenous women, among others, require special attention.

  • Country

    Liechtenstein
  • Extracts

    The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) has significantly contributed to ending impunity for gender-based crimes, and its Prosecutor has declared the issue of sexual violence to be one of the priorities of her work. Indeed, 18 of the persons currently accused in the Court's cases are charged with sexual crimes. Where national justice systems are unable to deliver justice, the ICC can play an important role pursuant to the principle of complementarity. It can also assist in domestic proceedings by providing information and evidence. The Court also provides direct assistance to victims on the ground through its Trust Fund for Victims, which Liechtenstein continues to support. Like other speakers before us in the debate, we remain of the view that the grave situation in Syria merits referral to the International Criminal Court by the Council.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    My country is currently moving forward with a review process of our legal and institutional framework with the aim of ensuring its confirmity with a plan of action for comprehensive implementation of the resolution. The process seeks to systematize some of the activities that are already being developed at the internal level, such as educating the armed forces on women's rights. In order to do so, we are in regular contact with various partners so as to learn the best practices already being used for similar action plans. Concerning political rights, our executive authorities recently proposed an initiative to the legislature aimed at ensuring women's equitable representation in the Chamber of Deputies and the Senate. With regard to the United Nations mandate, we are striving to increase the number of women on the lists of candidates for high-level posts, particularly those having to do with political operations and, of course, peacekeeping.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    Strengthening inclusive and solid societies must be an essential part in re-establishing the rule of law, both in societies living with armed conflict and those that are undergoing the process of reconstruction and reconciliation. There can be no lasting peace without justice, and it is therefore vital to ensure that national dialogue and reconciliation processes contribute effectively to fighting impunity and ensuring not only that women take part in the processes of reform of the security and justice systems but that they are also full participants in those systems once they are reformed.

  • Country

    Mexico
  • Extracts

    In that regard, we note the Declaration facilitated by Mexico and Denmark and adopted at the High-level Meeting of the General Assembly on the Rule of Law at the National and International Levels in September 2012. The text enshrines “the importance of ensuring that women...fully enjoy the benefits of the rule of law” (General Assembly resolution 67/1, para. 16), and we committed to ensuring their full participation in institutions of governance and the judicial system.

  • Country

    Qatar
  • Extracts

    Thirteen years after the adoption of the historic resolution 1325 (2000), the culmination of a long process concerning women and international peace and security, the Security Council is still considering the issue. Our debates, however, reveal shortcomings in the area of the rights of women, which are being terribly violated, particularly in the Arab world. The Security Council has established several criteria for women's contributions to settling conflicts and their role in conflict and post-conflict situations. Those criteria should be implemented, in conformity with Security Council provisions, in order to achieve the goals of women's participation in conflict resolution and the reconstruction of society in the aftermath of conflict. Women should be integrated into peace negotiations and into social reconstruction. Their participation at every level is still incomplete. Their access to transitional justice systems must be facilitated, including in relation to crimes committed in conflict, especially since women and children are victims of particular types of crime and subject to discrimination, and they face social and cultural impediments that hinder their access to justice mechanisms.

  • Country

    Qatar
  • Extracts

    The State of Qatar understands the importance of the rule of law and of strengthening women's participation and promoting women's and girls' rights in post-conflict reconstruction and conflict resolution. Their participation should be strengthened in order to enable them to function in the political arena, particularly through a collection of initiatives enabling their comprehensive inclusion.

  • Country

    Qatar
  • Extracts

    We also recognize the positive contribution of the Security Council to the rule of law, which is one of the key aspects of conflict prevention, peacekeeping, conflict resolution and peacebuilding. We fully agree with the prevailing position that justice, including transitional justice, is a fundamental building block of sustainable peace in countries in conflict or post- conflict situations. Delivering justice and security in respect of the rule of law mitigates conflict, helps reduce the risk of relapse into further conflict and creates conditions conducive to sustainable development.

  • Country

    Slovenia
  • Extracts

    Rebuilding justice and the rule of law is critical to any post-conflict transitional process burdened by the legacies of mass atrocities, serious human-rights violations and a weakened judicial infrastructure. A gender perspective, as well as the participation of women, should be injected into those processes. Transitional justice processes should address the full range of conflict-related violations of women's rights. As particularly vulnerable victims in conflict-affected situations, women experience grave consequences from breakdowns in the rule of law, in the form of a range of violations including, but not limited to, sexual and gender-based violence. In that context, Slovenia particularly welcomes the reference to the need for access to a full range of sexual and reproductive health services in the resolution adopted today (2122 (2013)).

  • Country

    Slovenia
  • Extracts

    Addressing abhorrent violations by ensuring access to justice, formal and informal, as well as full rights of redress, is essential to the process of reconciliation and lasting peace. Importantly, preventing impunity for the perpetrators of such crimes decreases the chance that they will recur in the future. Furthermore, the representation of women should be ensured in the justice sector. Eliminating violence against women and violations of their social and economic rights is a prerequisite for ensuring their full participation in recovery. Gender-sensitive legal and institutional reforms that conform with international standards are therefore needed.

  • Country

    Slovenia
  • Extracts

    The primary responsibility for the prosecution of conflict-related crimes, including violations of women's rights, belongs to States. However, while the principle of complementarity enhances national capabilities to prosecute such crimes effectively, more efforts must be made to improve criminal justice at the national level. The international legal framework for judicial assistance to countries should be strengthened. That includes extradition between States in order to support the effective prosecution of international crimes at the national level. Having recognized that legal gap, Slovenia has been working together with the Netherlands and Belgium on an initiative to consider the possibility of adopting a new international instrument for mutual legal assistance and extradition for the effective investigation and prosecution of the most serious crimes of international concern by domestic jurisdictions. We intend to continue our activities in that regard in the framework of the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, and invite other States to join the initiative.

  • Country

    Slovenia
  • Extracts

    The role of international criminal courts and tribunals, in particular the International Criminal Court (ICC), remains crucial to the establishment of the rule of law, especially in cases where States are unable or unwilling to pursue accountability for serious crimes. Moreover, the contribution of international criminal justice, including the ICC, to the field of gender discrimination and crimes of sexual violence has been and will continue to be momentous. As stressed by ICC Prosecutor Bensouda in a panel on international criminal justice at a strategic forum held last month in Bled, Slovenia, the ICC should also be seen as an investment in the future of women and humankind as a whole. To that end, Slovenia will continue to firmly support the International Criminal Court and international instruments regarding individual criminal responsibility, and calls on States to accede to or ratify the Rome Statute and its amendments.

  • Country

    Slovenia
  • Extracts

    With regard to the issue of women and girls and the justice sector, Slovenia is supporting a project aimed at improving the status of juvenile offenders, particularly girls, and strengthening the juvenile justice sector in the Afghan province of Herat. Activities envisaged for 2013 and 2014 will include the psychological rehabilitation of underage girls in prison and their reintegration into society, and awareness-raising campaigns for the general public on the situation of imprisoned minors, as well as expert training for officials in the judiciary.

  • Country

    Syria
  • Extracts

    The Syrian authorities are eager to bring to justice all those who commit such crimes, and we are documenting those grave violations. Syria arrests the perpetrators and subjects them to accountability under Syrian national law. On the other hand, we must work together to remove the root causes of crimes against women and girls and to combat impunity by immediately putting pressure on the regimes that seek to promote terrorism in Syria to halt their financial support and the provision of arms, as well as to end the media coverage they give to terrorist groups that violate women's basic rights. We call for the accountability of the regimes of both Qatar and Saudi Arabia for their support for and the media coverage they provide to the crazy, irresponsible minds that encourage the rape of innocent Syrian women.

  • Country

    Syria
  • Extracts

    Syria has notified all the specialized organs of the United Nations system, especially the Security Council and the General Assembly, through a number of official communications and reports. Regrettably, the United Nations remains less engaged than expected, despite the important role it could play to achieve justice, to hold perpetrators accountable and to put an end to such an inhuman and immoral phenomenon.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    We appreciate the focus of today's debate — women's rights must be an integral component of efforts to rebuild justice and rule of law in conflict and post- conflict situations. I wish to address three areas. First, with regard to participation, we need to remove the obstacles blocking women's access to justice, which are often rooted in traditional and cultural attitudes, increase the number of women in national and international judiciary bodies and ensure that gender awareness informs their decisions. Secondly, with respect to protection, laws must be gender-sensitive, including by upholding the right of women to own land and by criminalizing sexual and gender-based violence; there should be no amnesty for such crimes. Thirdly, as to reparations, to be effective, they must have the strength to prevent the recurrence of violations and eliminate the root causes of gender inequality.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    While Governments have the primary responsibility to steer such processes, the international community and other actors can provide critical support. In the fight against impunity for perpetrators of war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide, where women are often the victims, the International Criminal Court has a unique role in complementing the efforts of national courts when these are unable to bring perpetrators to justice. The United Nations also has a key role to play in assistance and capacity-building. Former judges and the specialized staff of United Nations ad hoc tribunals are potentially resources, as is cooperation with civil society organizations, in particular women- led organizations.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    It is increasingly evident that the rule of law is all too often the second victim of conflict, the first victims being women and girls. Portugal reaffirms the view that women and girls are disproportionately affected by armed conflicts and remain particularly vulnerable in post-conflict situations. Sexual and gender-based violence, child and forced marriages and disruption in education, to name but a few of the facts of conflict, are magnified when it comes to women and girls. The Security Council has repeatedly acknowledged that fact and must continue to act on such a basis. On the other hand, there is a tendency to consider transitional justice as the second-to-last concern of peace agreements, the last being the participation of women in peace agreements.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    It is our firm belief that only through the systematic and active participation of women in peace processes can transitional justice truly assume a national dimension and lay the foundations for rebuilding the rule of law and reconciliation. We have been witnessing the very important role women can plan in reconciliation processes when they are included from the outset.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    The approach chosen today for the current debate links two fundamental principles to which Spain is particularly committed: the first is the fight against impunity for crimes against women in armed conflict, and the second is women's participation in rebuilding the rule of law in post-conflict situations in order to put an end to the structures of inequality and discrimination in the context of which those crimes were committed.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    On that count I would like to highlight the initiatives mentioned by the Secretary-General in his report that have promoted the involvement of women in crisis and conflict situations. I would like to highlight specific areas where Spain has participated. They are the High-level Conference on Women's Leadership in the Sahel Region, held in Brussels in April; the work of UN Women through counselling many countries on incorporating women's rights and gender equality in measures being taken to restore peace and guarantee justice in the context of a transition; and the general recommendation that the Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women has adopted today on women and conflict-prevention, conflicts and post-conflict.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    As stated on many occasions, Spain devotes particular efforts to promoting a gender perspective in conflict situations and has had a plan of action on women, peace and security since 2007. Within that framework, our country carries out various actions within the scope of its foreign policy, cooperation and defence activities in order to guarantee the correct implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). In particular, I would like to refer to the International Seminar on Gender Perspective and Peace Operations, coordinated by the Ministries of Foreign Affairs and Defence of Spain and the Netherlands. The sixth edition of that seminar will take place next November in The Hague. The seminar includes a specific module on the role of women in the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration processes, as well as on the processes regarding security sector reform. Spanish cooperation plays a leading role in that regard through the plan on gender-sensitive peacebuilding, with a chapter dedicated to gender-sensitive transitional justice and the rule of law. Furthermore, the Office for Humanitarian Action of the Spanish Agency for International Aid for Development has elaborated a guide to address sexual violence in humanitarian interventions.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    I will conclude by quoting the words of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, who, on the occasion of an expert-level dialogue on the approach of the United Nations on transitional justice, pointed out that peace processes constitute historic opportunities for broadening the goals of post-conflict justice. Spain wants those opportunities effectively recognize women's rights, both in terms of guarantees of justice and conditions of peace.

  • Country

    Switzerland
  • Extracts

    First, Switzerland puts particular stress on a gender-sensitive implementation of the transitional justice mechanisms. As Ms. Balipou pointed out earlier, women's perspectives and needs should be included in all four principles against impunity: the right to be informed, the right to justice, the right to reparations and the guarantee of non-recurrence. As we know from experience, violent conflict affects women and men differently, not only with respect to the types of violence suffered, especially sexually-based violence, but also based on their different biological and social roles and identities. Prosecutions for gender-based and sexist violence at the national and international levels are thus key to achieving reconciliation and reintegration in post-conflict societies. For example, when truth commissions investigate violations from a gender viewpoint, they identify the impact of those violations on women and men alike and can make recommendations that lead to specific gender- sensitive initiatives in terms of justice, reparation and institutional reform.

  • Country

    Switzerland
  • Extracts

    Secondly, archives are key to the fight against impunity, especially to the full realization of the right to be informed. Switzerland welcomes the work of the experts convoked at the initiative of the British Government on the prevention of gender-based violence, which makes good use of archives in order to expose sexual violence committed in conflict situations and to investigate crimes. Switzerland has seconded an expert to the working group and stands ready to contribute further expertise.

  • Country

    Azerbaijan
  • Extracts

    We have proposed to focus our debate on women, the rule of law and transitional justice in conflict-affected situations. In recent times, the Security Council has paid increasing attention to the issue, acknowledging that combating impunity, addressing past violations, rebuilding the justice sector and asserting the principles of the rule of law underpin efforts to build peace and stability in the aftermath of conflict. However, less attention has been paid to the gender consequences of the breakdown of the rule of law during and after conflict. While genuine gains have been made in strengthening the political will and international legal framework to secure justice and deal with conflict- related sexual violence, little has been said of the full range of violations and serious crimes experienced by women, including enforced disappearances, foreign occupation, mass forced displacement, restrictions on humanitarian aid, conflict-related human trafficking and the destruction of civilian infrastructure. There can be no tolerance for such acts. Combating impunity and strengthening both international and national justice responses are critically important in that regard.

  • Country

    Azerbaijan
  • Extracts

    Governments bear the primary responsibility for the protection of civilians and for ensuring accountability for conflict-related criminal offenses. In resolution 2122 (2013), adopted today, the Security Council once again calls on Member States to comply with their relevant obligations to end impunity and to thoroughly investigate and prosecute persons responsible for genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity and other serious violations of international humanitarian law. At the same time, when national authorities fail to take action, the international community should play a more proactive role in ensuring an appropriate response. Such measures and appropriate protection and accountability efforts must obviously be free of selectively and politically motivated approaches and preferences. It is essential to address conflict-related violations and abuses of human rights through all available means, including, inter alia, by mandating international commissions of inquiry and fact-finding missions, as well as by supporting the implementation of the recommendations of those bodies and missions.

  • Country

    Azerbaijan
  • Extracts

    As we have stated on a number of occasions, wrongs that have been left unpunished or unrecognized may impede progress in achieving long-awaited peace and reconciliation. Such wrongs can also play a key role in the eruption of new conflicts and the commission of new crimes. One consistent reminder of that particular aspect of such problems can be seen in my country's experience in the tragic humanitarian consequences of the war unleashed against it, which has included mass atrocities committed by hostile armed forces, forced population displacement in Azerbaijan and the continuing military occupation of its territories.

  • Country

    Azerbaijan
  • Extracts

    It is important that Security Council member States and regional organizations ensure that mediators in the peace and preventive diplomacy process can contribute to ensuring accountability, including by encouraging the parties concerned to envisage transitional justice clauses in peace agreements. Those responsible for serious crimes committed during conflicts, including gender-based violence, must be excluded from all branches of Government, and the principle of no amnesty or any other form of indulgence for the perpetrators of such offenses must be applied. Such measures should be implemented comprehensively and should also envisage the full rights of victims to redress.

  • Country

    Azerbaijan
  • Extracts

    In resolution 2122 (2013), the Council recalls applicable provisions of international law on the right to reparations for violations of individual rights. It is essential that reparations programmes receive increased recognition and support as a tool for delivering justice and redress for victims and longer-term peace dividends within societies and communities. The contribution of transitional justice measures to rebuilding the rule of law, redress, justice and reconciliation makes such measures equally important tools for furthering women's rights in post-conflict societies.

  • Country

    Czech Rep.
  • Extracts

    The Czech Republic fully endorses the relevant rules of international criminal law regarding “rape, sexual slavery, enforced prostitution, enforced pregnancy, enforced sterilization, or any other form of sexual violence of comparable gravity”. The Rome Statute qualifies these as a war crime, both in the context of international and non-international armed conflicts and — when it forms part of a widespread attack against a civilian population — as a crime against humanity.

  • Country

    Czech Rep.
  • Extracts

    It is our conviction that the international community should put particular focus on preventive efforts, namely in the case of those violations of international law that belong to the core crimes included under the concept of the responsibility to protect. The rich jurisprudence of the international criminal tribunals has recognized rape as a powerful tool of war used to intimidate, persecute and terrorize the enemy. The Czech Republic believes that the effective prosecution of the perpetrators of such crimes is an important element of lasting peace and justice.

  • Country

    Czech Rep.
  • Extracts

    As part of its human rights promotion activities, the Czech Republic takes into consideration gender aspects and the protection of women in post-conflict situations, as well as in countries in transition, including by supporting projects of Czech and local non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Since 2005, the transition promotion programme of the Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs — a unique financial instrument aimed at democracy assistance — has supported projects of civil society organizations that are working to strengthen democracy, the rule of law and respect for human rights by empowering civil society, including women's organizations, throughout the world.

Reconstruction and Peacebuilding
  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    Security Council resolution 1325 was a landmark measure. It affirmed the principle that women's participation in conflict prevention, mitigation, and recovery is vital to the maintenance of international security and peace. Not a sideshow, but vital.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    In the wake of such suffering, we understand that inadequate governance and limited resources may complicate the task of recovery and healing. There is, however, one standard we can live up to regardless of the situation -- and that is the principle of inclusion; whether a country is rich or poor, there is no excuse for denying women fair representation when negotiating the terms of the peace, when enacting laws or in forging a conflict free future. And here, the United Nations should be a standard setter and, according to the Secretary General's September report, some important progress is being made.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    "Because of UN Women and its partners, numerous productive initiatives are underway. These range from peace building efforts by women in Mali to new legal protection measures in Colombia to smoother access to justice in Haiti to the enhanced role for women in the police of Zimbabwe. Women are also playing an important part in preparing for elections in Sierra Leone and in harnessing new communications technology to monitor and report on violations in Sudan and other areas of conflict."

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    In previous statements my delegation has already spoken about the importance of ensuring the empowerment of women. Their participation at all levels of economic, political and social life is as crucial to sustainable peace as it is to poverty reduction, economic recovery and sustainable development. We welcome the the Peacebuilding Commission's declaration on women's economic empowerment for peacebuilding.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Notably greater involvement of women — from mediation, restoring the rule of law and governance to participation in post-conflict electoral processes — continues to require commitment and attention. It also requires greater dedicated resourcing, particularly for civil society groups working on the ground.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    We have taken note of the indicators proposed in the Secretary-General's report. Indicators can be useful in assessing situations as countries move from situations of armed conflict to conflict resolution and from peacebuilding to post-conflict reconstruction. We must recognize, however, the difficulties in obtaining credible and verifiable information from armed conflict zones. It would be useful to have further discussions before adopting such indicators to ensure their relevance and efficiency.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    We have taken note of the indicators proposed in the Secretary-General's report. Indicators can be useful in assessing situations as countries move from situations of armed conflict to conflict resolution and from peacebuilding to post-conflict reconstruction. We must recognize, however, the difficulties in obtaining credible and verifiable information from armed conflict zones. It would be useful to have further discussions before adopting such indicators to ensure their relevance and efficiency.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    Women's legal status and rights must be ensured in post-conflict situations. Strengthening the legal framework to address issues of discrimination against women with respect to land ownership, access to economic opportunity and employment, education and health care is an essential component of gender- responsive peacebuilding architecture.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    For the Council to remain responsive, it is critical that timely and relevant information and analysis is provided systematically by all UN actors deployed on conflict resolution and peacebuilding efforts. We commend today's resolution for clearly articulating this. As we know, it has long been recognised that women's engagement in conflict prevention and resolution, and peacebuilding efforts is more likely to lead to sustainable peace and security.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    In post-conflict settings, women's full and effective participation is fundamental to efforts to rebuild the justice sector and to security sector reform. In Solomon Islands for example, Australia supported, through the Participating Police Force, the post-conflict recruitment and retention of female officers to the local police force. The early involvement of women, and the integration of a gender-perspective, led directly to the establishmen to critical domestic violence and sexual abuse services. More fundamentally, it also underwrote the broader processes of community rebuilding.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    In post-conflict settings, women's full and effective participation is fundamental to efforts to rebuild the justice sector and to security sector reform. In Solomon Islands for example, Australia supported, through the Participating Police Force, the post-conflict recruitment and retention of female officers to the local police force. The early involvement of women, and the integration of a gender-perspective, led directly to the establishmen to critical domestic violence and sexual abuse services. More fundamentally, it also underwrote the broader processes of community rebuilding.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    The Pacific region is working to achieve better participation in formal conflict prevention and management and post-conflict recovery efforts, as well as oversight and accountability mechanisms for the security sector. The region recognizes the value of having women at the negotiating table in leadership roles and the need to provide sufficient recognition and resources to ensure that they are able to do their work.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    The action plan provides a detailed regional framework to enhance women's and young women's leadership in conflict prevention and peacebuilding, mainstream gender and ensure the protection of women's and girls' human rights in humanitarian crises and in transitioning from conflict, disaster or post-conflict situations — all with a mechanism to accelerate the implementation of existing international, regional and national commitments on women, peace and security.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    We thank the Secretary- General, the Executive Director of UN Women, High Commissioner Pillay and Ms. Brigitte Balipou, the representative of the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security, for their active involvement and valuable contributions. We also welcome the unanimous adoption of resolution 2122 (2013) by the Council earlier today, calling for higher levels of women's involvement in peacekeeping and peacebuilding. It is undeniable that the role, views and leadership of women are essential if we are to truly make and sustain peace.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    When empowered, women can have an important positive impact on the lives of the individuals in their societies, particularly in countries emerging from conflict. The Security Council is called on to continue to make sure that such impact is fully felt in all relevant situations on its agenda.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    The resolution 2122 (2013), adopted this morning, is another clear ref lection of the strong resolve of the Council concerning the critical role of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, peacebuilding and peacekeeping. We are particularly appreciative of the fact that the resolution provides a good reference on supporting the development and strengthening of the capacities of national institutions in order to provide sustainable assistance to women and girls affected by armed conflict and post-conflict situations.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    Indonesia is steadfast in its commitment to ensuring women's participation at all levels of conflict prevention, conflict resolution and peacebuilding, and it has been undertaking various measures at home to that effect, in close partnership with civil society, including women's organizations.

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    The Secretary-General's report also indicates that in the context of economic recovery and access to resources during and after conflict, women have also played a very limited role. My country believes that women should enjoy, in peacetime and in conflict situations, all economic and social rights, inheritance and property rights, and access to basic services, especially in areas of health and education.

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    "Republic of the Congo. Rwanda, of course, sets the most progressive example in that respect. Togo encourages the United Nations to assist countries that have not yet done so to integrate into their national systems the experience of those who have managed to increase the role of women in peace processes and post-conflict reconstruction."

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    With regard to the most recent report of the Secretary- General (S/2013/525), we note with satisfaction that the attention from the international community to the issue of sexual violence in conflict has increased. We therefore call upon all stakeholders to continue their efforts to reduce and eliminate the high incidence of threats faced by women and girls in contemporary armed conflicts. However, we realize that despite the urgency with which practices in implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) have improved, there remains a deficit in opportunities for women on both the national and international levels. To exercise leadership, there remains an ongoing underrepresentation of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, protection and peacebuilding processes and efforts.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    We therefore welcome the fact that resolution 2122 (2013), adopted earlier today, emphasizes the positive role that women can and will play if they are fully included in all aspects of conflict-prevention and peacebuilding. The potential of women in building a sustainable peace cannot be underestimated, nor can the imminent problems for post-conflict societies if those who bear the burden of reconstruction on the ground are not fully included in decision-making.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Secondly, 43 countries have adopted national action plans on women, peace and security. That is an important first step. However, any progress on the ground depends on the political will to abide by those commitments. The German national action plan, which was adopted last year, covers the four focus areas set out in resolution 1325 (2000) and additionally includes the areas of preparation for peace missions and the prosecution of crimes. The implementation of the action plan is monitored by an inter-ministerial working group in collaboration with representatives from civil society. German diplomatic missions abroad have been instructed to support the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), for example by advocating for the inclusion of women in local crisis prevention, conflict management and post-conflict peacebuilding or by supporting gender-sensitive projects on the ground.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Germany will continue its support to UN Women and all other relevant actors, including civil society organizations, to ensure that women's roles and their important contribution in conflict resolution and peacebuilding are adequately taken into account.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    Among others, resolution 2106 (2013) underlines the importance of women's greater participation and leadership in decision-making processes in areas of conflict. In many cases, women are excluded from decision-making. Nevertheless, their full and equal participation in peacemaking and peacebuilding is indispensable for the success of those processes, since it is the only way to ensure that the needs of women involved in conflict-related situations are effectively addressed. Women must be seen not solely as victims, but as active agents of change and of peacekeeping.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    The signing of peace agreements and ceasefire agreements and the implementation of national action plans and programmes for the protection of women in conflict-affected countries have made it possible to identify, in a more appropriate way, the ways and means likely to promote women's rights and to strengthen their participation in efforts to prevent and resolve conflicts and in post-conflict reconstruction.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    Effective and optimal empowerment of women in the context of peacebuilding and post-conflict reconstruction involves the collective and coordinated action of the international community and the United Nations system, through strengthening protection and prevention measures adapted to specific contexts that will facilitate the implementation of the resolution.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    The establishment of genuine peace requires the establishment of inclusive and durable political, economic and social structures. Within that framework, local women's entities are a driving force in empowering women and strengthening good governance. My delegation welcomes the work carried out in the framework of the United Nations system to strengthen women's capacities and involvement in mediation and peacebuilding processes. Similarly, it supports the implementation of the Secretary-General's seven-point action plan (see S/2010/466), which enables greater consideration of gender issues in peacebuilding operations.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    While it is obvious that States have the primary responsibility for ensuring that the Resolutions on Women, Peace and Security are translated into action, regional organizations working on the maintenance of international peace and security such as the OSCE, also have a recognized role. Both the recent Presidential Statement on cooperation with regional organizations, passed in August of this year by the Council, and several of the Women, Peace and Security resolutions refer to the crucial contribution of regional organizations in affirming the participation of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution mechanisms and peace-building.

  • Country

    Pakistan
  • Extracts

    "Given women's strong stake in peace and in how peace is negotiated, kept and consolidated, the role of women as peacemakers and peacebuilders must be integrated into the various stages of engagement, outreach and decision-making. Increased integration in pursuing the agenda on women and peace and security is useful for enhanced coordination and for avoiding duplication and the overlap of efforts and resources. However, too much integration can also carry the risk of losing the original focus on the primary objectives of that agenda. Including peripheral issues in the Council's work relating to women and peace and security would not only blur the focus but affect implementation."

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    For over a decade now, resolution 1325 (2000) has clearly confirmed its vital role and importance in strengthening the role of women in the prevention and settlement of armed conflicts and during post- conflict reconstruction, as well as in their protection during such conflicts. Unfortunately, despite numerous efforts, women continue to fall victim to various forms of violence. That is why we believe that more attention needs to be given to all categories of such crimes. Such a balanced approach is enshrined in resolution 1325 (2000). Cases of women and children being killed and getting injured are a cause for serious concern, including as a result of the indiscriminate or excessive use of force. We think it is unacceptable to simply turn a blind eye to such crimes or to justify them as so-called inevitable acts of collateral damage, which contradicts provisions in the Geneva Conventions.

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    We are convinced of the significantly positive potential of women's participation in various aspects of the settlement of armed conflict and post-conflict reconstruction. Women must not only be seen as victims

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Secondly, the Security Council should play its unique role fully, while strengthening its coordination and cooperation with related organizations and agencies. As the primary institution for maintaining international peace and security, the Council should focus on conflict prevention, dispute mediation and post-conflict reconstruction so as to foster an enabling political, security and rule-of-law environment for safeguarding women's security, rights and interests. The General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council, the Human Rights Council, UN Women and other United Nations agencies should discharge their respective responsibilities while working closely with one another with a view to generating synergies.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    In order to realize a more peaceful society, Japan intends to make its utmost effort to ensure women's participation and incorporate a women's perspective into each and every phase of conflict prevention, conflict settlement and peacebuilding, including election processes. Such women's participation will also contribute to better protecting the rights and the physical well-being of women, including female human rights defenders, female political leaders and female war correspondents, who are particularly exposed to danger in times of conflict.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    Malaysia welcomes today's adoption of the resolution 2122 (2013) on the issue discussed. My delegation hopes that there will be sufficient impetus toward the actual realization of the resolution and the landmark resolution 1325 (2000). Malaysia therefore appreciates the ongoing update on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in the Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525) of 4 September. As mentioned in the report, there remains a deficit in opportunities for women to exercise leadership, and women are still underrepresented in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, protection and peacebuilding processes. My delegation believes that the greater active participation of women in peacekeeping and peacebuilding would go a long way towards including a gender perspective and allowing women to shape peace.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    In that regard, there is a need to increase the number of women in high-level decision-making positions in peacekeeping and peacebuilding operations. Malaysia is also supportive of appointing more women protection advisers to monitor and report on sexual violence in all relevant situations. We appreciate the positive values they bring in creating greater awareness of sexual violence issues, reporting incidents of sexual violence and implementing Security Council resolutions on the ground.

  • Country

    Canada
  • Extracts

    Canada firmly believes that the participation of women in all decision-making processes, particularly those related to the prevention and resolution of conflict and the transition to democracy, is a necessary precondition to securing sustainable peace, as is their access to justice and their inclusion in the economic and social lives of their countries and communities. As the Honourable John Baird, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Canada, said in his address to the General Assembly last month:

  • Country

    Qatar
  • Extracts

    Thirteen years after the adoption of the historic resolution 1325 (2000), the culmination of a long process concerning women and international peace and security, the Security Council is still considering the issue. Our debates, however, reveal shortcomings in the area of the rights of women, which are being terribly violated, particularly in the Arab world. The Security Council has established several criteria for women's contributions to settling conflicts and their role in conflict and post-conflict situations. Those criteria should be implemented, in conformity with Security Council provisions, in order to achieve the goals of women's participation in conflict resolution and the reconstruction of society in the aftermath of conflict. Women should be integrated into peace negotiations and into social reconstruction. Their participation at every level is still incomplete. Their access to transitional justice systems must be facilitated, including in relation to crimes committed in conflict, especially since women and children are victims of particular types of crime and subject to discrimination, and they face social and cultural impediments that hinder their access to justice mechanisms.

  • Country

    Qatar
  • Extracts

    The State of Qatar understands the importance of the rule of law and of strengthening women's participation and promoting women's and girls' rights in post-conflict reconstruction and conflict resolution. Their participation should be strengthened in order to enable them to function in the political arena, particularly through a collection of initiatives enabling their comprehensive inclusion.

  • Country

    Qatar
  • Extracts

    We also recognize the positive contribution of the Security Council to the rule of law, which is one of the key aspects of conflict prevention, peacekeeping, conflict resolution and peacebuilding. We fully agree with the prevailing position that justice, including transitional justice, is a fundamental building block of sustainable peace in countries in conflict or post- conflict situations. Delivering justice and security in respect of the rule of law mitigates conflict, helps reduce the risk of relapse into further conflict and creates conditions conducive to sustainable development.

  • Country

    Italy
  • Extracts

    In 2015, the Security Council will hold a high- level meeting to review the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). The Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525) includes strategic measures to accelerate implementation, of which I would like to highlight three recommendations: increasing women's participation in United Nations peacekeeping and political missions, especially at the middle — and senior-management levels; reaching the target of 15 per cent spending for post-conflict peacebuilding projects on gender equality and women's empowerment; and systematically addressing all elements of resolution 1325 (2000) in the work of the Security Council.

  • Country

    Portugal
  • Extracts

    With regard to peacekeeping and peacebuilding, we also find encouraging examples of clearer political will and adequate allocation of resources aimed at increasing the proportion of women in uniformed components in operations and in national security sector institutions.

  • Country

    Spain
  • Extracts

    As stated on many occasions, Spain devotes particular efforts to promoting a gender perspective in conflict situations and has had a plan of action on women, peace and security since 2007. Within that framework, our country carries out various actions within the scope of its foreign policy, cooperation and defence activities in order to guarantee the correct implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). In particular, I would like to refer to the International Seminar on Gender Perspective and Peace Operations, coordinated by the Ministries of Foreign Affairs and Defence of Spain and the Netherlands. The sixth edition of that seminar will take place next November in The Hague. The seminar includes a specific module on the role of women in the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration processes, as well as on the processes regarding security sector reform. Spanish cooperation plays a leading role in that regard through the plan on gender-sensitive peacebuilding, with a chapter dedicated to gender-sensitive transitional justice and the rule of law. Furthermore, the Office for Humanitarian Action of the Spanish Agency for International Aid for Development has elaborated a guide to address sexual violence in humanitarian interventions.

  • Country

    S. Korea
  • Extracts

    Fourthly, we would like to underline the crucial role played by women's civil society organizations in conf lict- resolution and peacebuilding. In that regard, the Republic of Korea attaches great importance to the interactions between the Security Council and women's organizations. It is encouraging that the Council's recent field visit to the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Great Lakes included interactive meetings with local women's organizations.

Implementation
  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    Mr. President, I welcome the chance to participate in this debate on issues that are central to the mission of the United Nations and to the future of us all. I thank the Secretary General for his most recent report, for his presence here today, and for the personal commitment he has made to women, peace and security. I also thank Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka for her testimony and for her tremendous leadership of UN Women, we know the best is still ahead and we're delighted to have you in this role. I thank High Commissioner Pilay who has spent her whole career pressing this agenda with significant returns.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    This past year, as we've heard, women were included in every formal peace negotiating process led or co- led by the UN. Gender experts were present in eighty-five percent of delegations and, in each case, representatives of women's civil society groups were consulted. Women are playing a more prominent role in crisis prevention, most notably in Darfur and the Great Lakes Region. Since 2009, gender crimes investigators have been a part of all UN commissions of inquiry. And again as was said, this year 3 out of 10 peace agreements in UN supported processes included provisions for women's political participation or protection. That is more than the year before. Analysis of women and security is now included in most reports by peacekeeping and special political missions. And the Secretary General has established – and my government and other governments vigorously support – the policy of zero tolerance toward sexual- related abuses committed by UN personnel, something that still happens with alarming incidence.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    Clearly, the involvement of women in peace and security is a goal that must be approached from many directions simultaneously. And that's why the United States encourages every country to develop an action plan.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    "My government announced its own blueprint two years ago after broad consultations with civil society. The plan lays out a comprehensive strategy for incorporating women in efforts to prevent conflict, provide humanitarian protection, foster food security, and ensure fair treatment under the law."

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    This plan is backed by leaders across the U.S. government. President Obama is personally determined to change the DNA of the U.S. government so that this inexorable link between women's inclusion and lasting peace is a premise or an axiom brought to every policy discussion. President Obama and Secretary of State Kerry have ordered its full integration into our diplomacy; the Defense Department is spreading the message of gender awareness to partners across the globe; our Justice Department is working with police, prosecutors, and judges to increase accountability for sexual violence; and the Centers for Disease Control have launched a system for monitoring abuse against women and girls.

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    "Because of UN Women and its partners, numerous productive initiatives are underway. These range from peace building efforts by women in Mali to new legal protection measures in Colombia to smoother access to justice in Haiti to the enhanced role for women in the police of Zimbabwe. Women are also playing an important part in preparing for elections in Sierra Leone and in harnessing new communications technology to monitor and report on violations in Sudan and other areas of conflict."

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    "We've seen in Kenya civil society deeply engaged in a five year campaign – endorsed by the UN – to enshrine the rights of women to own land, live equally in marriage, and be free from the threat of violence. And on Election Day this past spring, a record eighty-seven women were chosen for parliament, a number that – pursuant to the country's new constitution – will increase further in the years ahead."

  • Country

    United States of America
  • Extracts

    "At least since the approval of Resolution 1325 thirteen years ago, the international community has agreed on the direction that we want to move. As we continue to go forward, let us confront honestly the obstacles that remain before us. Let's create a spin-free zone on 1325 and its implementation, and let's not conflate effort with results. They are different. Let us instead take concrete steps so that women share fully in efforts to avoid and contain conflict, just as they inevitably share in the suffering when such efforts are poorly designed or when they fail."

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    My delegation thanks Azerbaijan, as President for the month of October, for convening an open debate on women, peace and security. Lithuania welcomes the adoption of resolution 2122 (2013) today, which aims to streamline action within the United Nations system to implement resolution 1325 (2000) and other related decisions. It is important that the resolution clearly underlines the role of regional organizations and civil society. We appreciate the recommendations of the Secretary- General that provide a strategic look at and guidance on the implementation of existing commitments. We would also like to commend the work of Ms. Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director of UN Women. and her first briefing to the Council.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    We must pay greater attention to providing better support for victims, including by ensuring protection for witnesses, victims and justice officials, providing reparation mechanisms and ensuring the systematic inclusion of women in all aspects of conflict resolution. United Nations special representatives, peacekeeping and political missions and United Nations agencies have a much greater role to play.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Transitional justice cannot be a substitute for accountability. It should not limit the access of victims to reparations. Blanket amnesties cannot be extended to conflict-related sexual violence. We must pay greater attention to delivering reparation programmes and funding. We continue to support the wider Council practice of including sexual violence in the designation criteria for targeted sanctions.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    It is difficult to imagine tackling impunity without monitoring and reporting mechanisms. We welcome the Council's decision today that United Nations entities should do more systematic reporting to the Council, including analysis.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    The recent decrease in women's share of senior positions in United Nations field operations should be reversed. Efforts by the United Nations to retain, attract and support women staff should be complemented by efforts by Member States to consistently nominate more female candidates.

  • Country

    Lithuania
  • Extracts

    Notably greater involvement of women — from mediation, restoring the rule of law and governance to participation in post-conflict electoral processes — continues to require commitment and attention. It also requires greater dedicated resourcing, particularly for civil society groups working on the ground.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The resolution of armed conflict situations requires a holistic and sustainable approach. The participation of women in peace processes and post- conflict reconstruction efforts is necessary to lay the foundation for lasting peace. In that regard, resolution 1325 (2000) and successive Council resolutions on this issue have provided a framework for effective institutional arrangements. As the Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525) points out, significant progress has been made but much more needs to be done.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    India is one of the leading contributors to United Nations peacekeeping operations. Based on our broad experience, we believe that the Security Council must make resources available to implement the greater scope of peacekeeping mandates, including by providing more women protection advisers. India was the first State to successfully deploy an all-women police force as part of United Nations peacekeeping operations. We hope that more Member States will contribute a greater number of women military and police personnel to United Nations peacekeeping operations.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    We have taken note of the indicators proposed in the Secretary-General's report. Indicators can be useful in assessing situations as countries move from situations of armed conflict to conflict resolution and from peacebuilding to post-conflict reconstruction. We must recognize, however, the difficulties in obtaining credible and verifiable information from armed conflict zones. It would be useful to have further discussions before adopting such indicators to ensure their relevance and efficiency.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The general recommendation in the report of the Secretary-General to incorporate into that agenda other thematic areas — such as countering terrorism, transnational organized crime, natural resources and others — not only has implications for the division of work and responsibilities between the Security Council and the General Assembly, but also has the potential to dilute significant United Nations work being done in the area of women, peace and security and in other thematic areas.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    India is one of the leading contributors to United Nations peacekeeping operations. Based on our broad experience, we believe that the Security Council must make resources available to implement the greater scope of peacekeeping mandates, including by providing more women protection advisers. India was the first State to successfully deploy an all-women police force as part of United Nations peacekeeping operations. We hope that more Member States will contribute a greater number of women military and police personnel to United Nations peacekeeping operations.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    We have taken note of the indicators proposed in the Secretary-General's report. Indicators can be useful in assessing situations as countries move from situations of armed conflict to conflict resolution and from peacebuilding to post-conflict reconstruction. We must recognize, however, the difficulties in obtaining credible and verifiable information from armed conflict zones. It would be useful to have further discussions before adopting such indicators to ensure their relevance and efficiency.

  • Country

    India
  • Extracts

    The general recommendation in the report of the Secretary-General to incorporate into that agenda other thematic areas — such as countering terrorism, transnational organized crime, natural resources and others — not only has implications for the division of work and responsibilities between the Security Council and the General Assembly, but also has the potential to dilute significant United Nations work being done in the area of women, peace and security and in other thematic areas.

  • Speaker

    NATO
  • Extracts

    A key lesson is that we need to strengthen our focus on the implementation of already existing policies, action plans and directives. We are therefore pursuing the continued integration of a gender perspective into all phases and activities related to conflict analysis, planning and the execution of crisis management operations, and we are strengthening the role of gender advisers in the field. Those activities contribute to the enhancement of operational effectiveness and to the improved implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and related resolutions in an operational context.

  • Speaker

    NATO
  • Extracts

    As documented by that review, training, education and exercises remain key tools for ensuring that our security institutions and armed forces have the necessary competencies. We have made strides in strengthening the gender training offered under the auspices of NATO. The Nordic Centre for Gender in Military Operations, situated in Sweden, has been appointed department head for NATO gender training in military operations. Strengthened curriculums for both troops and gender advisers have been developed. NATO is also currently developing an online gender course, in close collaboration with the United Nations. We encourage partners to make use of available gender- training opportunities offered by NATO and its allies.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    The report of the Secretary-General reflects the measurable advances that have been made across all areas of the women, peace and security agenda since the adoption of landmark resolution 1325 (2000) 13 years ago, and its implementation. It has provided for the establishment of an enabling framework placing women at the centre of processes impacting on their safety, security and development, in equal partnership with men. The report highlights the remaining significant protection, prevention and participation deficits in the areas of peacekeeping, peacebuilding and post-conflict economic recovery, impeding the full and effective implementation of resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    However, we must recognize the limitation that comes with that approach and the underlying expectations of the mechanisms to deliver on these areas in a sustainable manner. Such an approach, we must appreciate, brings with it short-term relief and impact and therefore cannot be considered a panacea for the full and effective implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). The host State has to eventually play its rightful role in addressing the specific challenges in the longterm.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    My delegation welcomes the recommendations elaborated in the report of the Secretary-General on how to close these implementation gaps. A renewed commitment is also required of Member States and the United Nations system to effectively implement the seven-point action plan.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    While the host State needs to demonstrate the political will to fully implement resolution 1325 (2000), greater commitment and support by the United Nations and the international community is needed to capacitate countries in conflict and post-conflict situations. In the South African context, where women have been historically disadvantaged by apartheid and the patriarchal nature of South African society, men traditionally dominated the political and economic space. During the past 18 years of democratic rule, the Government instituted specific measures that included electoral and candidature quotas for women at the national, provincial and local levels of Government, including at the executive and legislature branches of Government.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    My delegation appreciates the commendable work undertaken by the Team of Experts on the Rule of Law and Sexual Violence in Conflict. However, we remain of the view that significantly more needs to be done by Member States, the United Nations system and the relevant entities in supporting national efforts by States to increase women's participation, leadership and expertise in the rule of law and transitional justice, as well as in advancing accountability measures for serious offences committed against women and children.

  • Country

    Southern Africa
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, my delegation welcomes resolution 2122 (2013) and its reinforcement of preceding resolutions. We also welcome the announcement by the Secretary-General of a high-level review in 2015 to assess progress at the global, regional and national levels on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    The draft decision of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) Ministerial Council on the OSCE action plan on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), which Turkey is sponsoring together with Austria, Finland and Kazakhstan, is a recent example of this. Turkey was also glad to join in the launch of the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict at the ministerial level on the sidelines of the General Assembly's general debate.

  • Country

    Turkey
  • Extracts

    Our special thanks goes to the Special Representative Bangura, whose exemplary dedication and groups from all sectors of society raise their voices higher against this atrocity, we will all be able to stand stronger in our struggle. That requires a need for stronger interaction with civil society, grass- roots institutions and women's organizations, as well as the private sector and the media.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    Mr President, Australia welcomes Azerbaijan bringing the Council's focus to the critical intersection between the rule of law and transitional justice, and the women, peace and security agenda. I thank the Secretary- General, and the High Commissioner for Human Rights, Ms Pillay for their determined efforts. And Ms Brigitte Balipou for inspiring struggle on the frontlines. And I welcome Madame Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, as the new Executive Director of UN Women – we look forward to receiving regular briefings from her and other senior UN officials on the gender dimensions of conflict and across the thematic work on our agenda. It is integral to our work that you regularly provide such input. Thirteen years ago, Security Council resolution 1325 recognised the central role of women to the maintenance of international peace and security. But as the Secretary-General's report makes clear, while there has been some progress, typically the linkages between women's participation and the work of the Council are not made. The consistent inclusion in mission mandates of women, peace and security objectives, is fundamental to addressing this.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    For the Council to remain responsive, it is critical that timely and relevant information and analysis is provided systematically by all UN actors deployed on conflict resolution and peacebuilding efforts. We commend today's resolution for clearly articulating this. As we know, it has long been recognised that women's engagement in conflict prevention and resolution, and peacebuilding efforts is more likely to lead to sustainable peace and security.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    Engaging women as leaders is critical to building sustainable peace. We must identify and address impediments that prevent women from participating in decision-making. We commend Mary Robinson's appointment as Special Envoy to the Great Lakes Region, and her long overdue approach to consulting early with women in the Democratic Republic of Congo. We support the UN's ongoing dialogue with women's civil society organisations as a barometer of progress and a critical source of knowledge on the effectiveness of missions.

  • Country

    Australia
  • Extracts

    In concluding, Mr President The High-Level Review of resolution 1325 in 2015 provides a necessary opportunity to take stock of our successes, and to address the ongoing challenges in implementing the women, peace and security agenda. The Council's dedicated field mission ahead of this will be important in providing us with direct insights to help inform these discussions. But – of course – for women in conflict-situations, our review of the effective implementation of the women, peace and security agenda cannot wait. And we must continue, across the whole breadth of our work, to rigorously to strengthen the Council's consideration of the gender dimensions of conflict. Thank you, Mr. President.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    While our country has periodically taken part in these debates, our comments today are special significance since this is our first speech following Chile's election as a non-permanent member of the Council for the period 2014-2015. We reiterate our commitment to the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) (2000), bearing in mind that 2015 will mark the fifteenth anniversary of that instrument, which has enabled us to progress, among other goals, in the promotion of women to positions of leadership, the prevention of gender-based violence in situations of conflict and post-conflict, and the creation of national plans in various countries, including Chile.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    In the spirit of brevity, I shall limit my remarks to several issues raised in the Secretary-General's recent report (S/2013/525) that we consider particularly important.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    We note the progress to date in the system as a whole and at the regional and national levels with regard to best practices, national plans, indicators and training. However, we are concerned by the persistent deficit in the number of women in leadership positions, as well as the lack of opportunities for them to rise to such positions. At the same time, we express our concern at the ongoing decline, as described in the report, in the number of women represented at the middle and high levels of mission leadership staff, the scarcity of data broken down by gender and age, and the gaps in financing.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    Similarly, we support the convening of a high-level meeting on the matter in 2015 and share the Secretary- General's recommendation that an independent worldwide study of the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) be undertaken to make a full diagnosis of its implementation status and detail priorities for further action. We hope that the the study will be designed above all to seek the broadest participation of Member States and of civil society so that it will enjoy cross-cutting support.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    We agree with the recommendations in the report about the need to promote sustainable budgets for the work, so as to strengthen women's organizations working at the national levels and to train women leaders of peace movements. While appreciating the work of the experts deployed in the field, we consider it essential to provide training at the system and national levels not only for those providing direct leadership in that area, but also to those performing management functions, whatever their role. My delegation agrees on the need to accelerate women's access to the political arena and to support transitional justice reform as a peacebuilding guarantee.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    It is my delegation's belief that the Security Council should use every means in its power to gather information on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions, particularly through briefings provided by the commissions of inquiry established to investigate situations on the Council's agenda. We take this opportunity to urge the members of the Council to hold well-informed consultations on those issues.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    I note that at the regional level, the Chilean Joint Centre for Peacekeeping Operations convened a seminar, jointly with the United States Naval Postgraduate School, entitled “Women, Peace and Security: Implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and new challenges”, in Santiago, Chile from 1 to 12 July. It was attended by professionals from Brazil, El Salvador, Guatemala, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay as well as from our own country. The seminar concluded with the adoption of a document in the form of an action plan, agreed in group discussions, embodying initiatives fully reflecting the international norms discussed during the seminar.

  • Country

    Chile
  • Extracts

    Chile will continue promoting the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), convinced as it is of the important role played by women in the prevention and resolution of conflicts and of the need to increase their participation in decision-making processes.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    However, we all know that we only are half-way there. Much remains to be done. While women now have a place in most peace negotiations, their situation remains ignored in the ensuing agreements, which too often do not include specific provisions on women, peace and security. Women should be consulted as fully invested stakeholders. The United Nations must be exemplary in that regard. The special representatives and special envoys of the Secretary-General must consult with civil society and women's organizations as soon as they arrive on the ground, and must continue to do so throughout their mandate.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    In New York, the issue of the participation of women should be included more frequently in briefings made to the Council by the Department of Peacekeeping Operations and the Department of Political Affairs, whose recommendations for better including women in conflict-resolution processes always prove to be valuable. Informal meetings of the Council with women working in the field should be continued and encouraged.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    In that regard, we can refer to the example of Mary Robinson, who brought together women's organizations from the Great Lakes region in July in Bujumbura. We believe that hers is a model of inclusive and early consultation that can be useful to everyone. We saw to it that this good practice was continued during the recent visit of Security Council members to the Democratic Republic of the Congo when they met, in the eastern part of that country, with women's organizations working to defend and promote the rights of women.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    Justice remains the cornerstone of stabilization in post-conflict situations. National Governments of course have the primary responsibility for prosecuting and punishing those resposible for sexual violence. However, when States fail to live up to their responsibilities, the International Criminal Court should be able to play its full role. The Court is already at work in the Central African Republic, in Mali and in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. France believes that the Court should be seized of the matter in Syria — as has now been amply justified. I should like to underscore here that all those responsible for violence against the Syrian people must one day be accountable before justice.

  • Country

    France
  • Extracts

    To make the fight against impunity tangible, access for women to the justice system is essential. Since 2011, in cooperation with UN Women, France has had in place a programme for strengthening women's access to justice in Afghanistan. In the framework of its plan of action, France has committed to a cooperation programme in Africa and in the Arab world, working in partnership with UN Women. We have recently specifically allocated support for programmes in Mali being implemented by local non-governmental organizations (NGOs), with a view to supporting the participation of women in political processes. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, we have similarly allocated more than €2 million to support Congolese NGOs to fight against sexual violence, strengthen the participation of women in decision-making processes and help women integrate on the socioeconomic level. In that spirit, next December France will organize in Paris a summit on peace and security in Africa, which will provide an opportunity for all to express and reaffirm their commitment to bringing about support for resolutions on women and peace and security.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    The Pacific region is working to achieve better participation in formal conflict prevention and management and post-conflict recovery efforts, as well as oversight and accountability mechanisms for the security sector. The region recognizes the value of having women at the negotiating table in leadership roles and the need to provide sufficient recognition and resources to ensure that they are able to do their work.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    In December 2010, as part of the tenth anniversary of the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), a Pacific regional working group on women, peace and security was established. In June 2011, the Forum Regional Security Committee gave the group the policy task of developing a regional action plan, which has been formally recognized by our leaders. Earlier this year, a regional reference group was established to oversee the regional action plan's implementation.

  • Country

    Marshall Is.
  • Extracts

    The action plan assists in addressing gaps and advancing solutions. A range of further means may be considered, including the United Nations regional gender architecture, United Nations in-country assistance — which is highly lacking — and resource allocation decisions. The Biketawa Declaration sets out the framework for regional conflict prevention and management of political crises. Our regional action plan is a key platform to better integrate gender into that security framework and thus represents a specific response to relevant Security Council resolutions.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    We thank the Secretary- General, the Executive Director of UN Women, High Commissioner Pillay and Ms. Brigitte Balipou, the representative of the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security, for their active involvement and valuable contributions. We also welcome the unanimous adoption of resolution 2122 (2013) by the Council earlier today, calling for higher levels of women's involvement in peacekeeping and peacebuilding. It is undeniable that the role, views and leadership of women are essential if we are to truly make and sustain peace.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    Having had the privilege to chair previous sessions of the Commission on the Status of Women, I would like to emphasize that the United Nations has made significant gains in securing commitments to gender equality and women's post-conflict empowerment. Specifically, the Secretary-General's seven-point action plan on gender- responsive peacebuilding is a well-conceived and realistic set of targets for the United Nations system.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    Armenia also commends the efforts of the newly appointed United Nations Special Envoy Mary Robinson and Special Representative of the Secretary- General Margaret Vogt and others in establishing the gender- responsive mediation practices, in particular over the past year, which saw the appointment of gender advisers, early and regular consultations with women, the establishment of women's advisory bodies, and the implementation of the commitment to secure women a place at peace talks.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    Recently, the United Nations has developed an increasingly sophisticated network for specialized gender experts for deployment to mediation, transitional justice and prosecutorial processes. Member States should avail themselves of these important resources. For example, the regular deployments of UN Women to commissions of enquiry over the past three years have produced a steady improvement in the extent to which human rights abuses against women are reported and acted upon. This is a direct result of the quality of expertise and the regular deployment of experts to those bodies.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    We also believe that without women's civil society strength and women's leadership, there will be no effective prevention. Women's experiences of violence during and after conflict are much broader, and effective protection from all forms of violence and violations will be possible only through their empowerment and participation.

  • Country

    Armenia
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, let me express our readiness to work closely with the Council, the United Nations bodies and the non-governmental organizations concerned to expand and implement the women, peace and security agenda by improving the situation of women around the world, including women affected by armed conflicts.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    The Security Council's engagement with the issue of women and peace and security has greatly contributed to our common efforts to improve the lives of women in conflict situations around the world. The resolutions adopted by the Council have created a comprehensive body of norms and stimulated progress on the protection and promotion of women's rights.

  • Country

    Brazil
  • Extracts

    When empowered, women can have an important positive impact on the lives of the individuals in their societies, particularly in countries emerging from conflict. The Security Council is called on to continue to make sure that such impact is fully felt in all relevant situations on its agenda.

  • Country

    Egypt
  • Extracts

    Egypt has considered with interest the Secretary- General's report on women and peace and security (S/2013/525). We would like to express our appreciation for the efforts made in the drafting of the report, which highlights the progress made, including the significant policy and operational focus on the monitoring, prevention and prosecution of violence against women in conflicts. In that context, I would like to make the following remarks.

  • Country

    Egypt
  • Extracts

    The practices of the Israeli occupation in the Arab occupied territories are a clear manifestation of violations of the human rights and fundamental freedoms of Arab women and girls under foreign occupation. Egypt stresses the responsibility of the United Nations system, as well as all international organizations concerned with women's issues, towards women under foreign occupation. There is definitely a need to pay greater attention to their suffering in order to ensure their full rights, in accordance with the relevant provisions of international law, international humanitarian law and human rights law. We request all senior officials and field-based entities responsible for reporting to the Council, particularly UN Women and the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, to systematically include information on the situation of women and girls in Arab-occupied territories in their reports and briefings.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    The EU Concept on Strengthening EU Mediation and Dialogue Capacities aims to promote the representation of women and the availability of adequate resources for dedicated gender expertise at an early stage of the mediation process. We call on the United Nations system to increase the participation of women in mediation activities, including as chief and lead mediators, and to include gender experts in the mediation teams. Supporting women's civil society groups is crucial to developing domestic constituencies for women's engagement in conflict resolution.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    We welcome the comprehensive approach of the report of the Secretary-General (S/2013/525) and particularly welcome the increasingly targeted and concrete recommendations for action. We underline the need for continued regular reporting and briefings to the Council. However, we note the need to further enhance the links between the information provided to the Council and the outcomes of the Council's work, particularly the mandates of the United Nations peace operations. We would also welcome reporting on the rule of law action point of the seven-point action plan on gender-sensitive peacebuilding.

  • Speaker

    European Union
  • Extracts

    The increasing number of national and regional action plans for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) provides the opportunity to compare different experiences in order to further improve our work. To further map our actions and experiences, we support the call of the Secretary-General for an independent global study on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) to prepare for the 2015 high-level review. Finally, I again thank you, Sir, for organizing this important debate.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    As stated in the Secretary-General's report on women's participation in peacebuilding (S/2010/466), it is essential to improve the approach of the United Nations in combating sexual and gender-based violence, particularly through the training for United Nations peacekeepers. In the context of peacekeeping, the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and other related resolutions has paved the way for a gender perspective mechanism in United Nations peacekeeping operations. Increasing the number of female peacekeepers on the ground would also be a positive step in support of resolution 1325 (2000). On our part, we are happy to point out that Indonesia has deployed female peacekeepers as well as military and police observers in several missions, including the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon, the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur, the United Nations Mission in South Sudan and the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti.

  • Country

    Indonesia
  • Extracts

    Indonesia is steadfast in its commitment to ensuring women's participation at all levels of conflict prevention, conflict resolution and peacebuilding, and it has been undertaking various measures at home to that effect, in close partnership with civil society, including women's organizations.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    In 2013 we have seen a very real focus by the Security Council on the protection aspect of the women and peace and security agenda. The Council's high- profile debate in June (S/PV.6984) and resolution 2106 (2013) demonstrated solid progress in that regard. The Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict, endorsed by 113 States, including my own, was a landmark.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    Hard tools, such as sanctions regimes that target perpetrators of sexual violence and appropriately mandated and trained peacekeeping missions, are effective instruments for the protection agenda, but the participation dimension of the women and peace and security agenda still requires targeted action by the Council. Indeed, the Council's role in addressing women's political participation in the peace and security agenda remains a challenge. That makes today's debate on the role of women in transitional justice even more important.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    Beyond simply being a just democratic principle, there are many tangible reasons for that. It builds trust in post-conflict justice institutions, and UN Women's research shows that women are more likely to report sexual and gender-based crimes to transitional justice institutions that involve women judges and officials. The Council should also make clear that there must be prominent roles for women, both as leaders and as active participants in the consultative processes that establish transitional arrangements.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    United Nations field presences must fully engage with women in civil society and the community. New Zealand thus encourages a consistent practice of deploying gender advisers to peacekeeping missions, with their role continuing through any transitional arrangements to assist in post-conflict processes.

  • Country

    New Zealand
  • Extracts

    In addition to the existing Pacific Regional Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security, which New Zealand is continuing to implement along with its regional partners, we are proceeding with the development of a comprehensive national action plan of our own. Looking ahead, we welcome the concept of an independent global study to assist in the preparations of the high-level review of resolution 1325 (2000) in 2015, and we believe our Pacific Regional Action Plan could provide a good example of regional action.

  • Country

    Rwanda
  • Extracts

    Our Government considers violence against women and girls as an assault on human dignity. Over the years, we have created a favourable environment for gender equality, women's empowerment and children's rights. We have demonstrated a strong political will to end the scourge by adopting supportive policies and legal frameworks, which include a gender- sensitive Constitution and laws on the prevention and punishment of gender-based violence and on the protection of children from violence. As Ambassador Power stated, our new parliament — our lower Chamber of Deputies — attests to the fruitfulness of the policies on our agenda, as recent elections raised women's representation in that body at 64 per cent.

  • Country

    Rwanda
  • Extracts

    "Let me also emphasize that, in our efforts to promote the women and peace and security agenda, in 2010, my country adopted a national action plan on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). To that end, we have adopted a range of policies to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls. One of the foremost priorities is to protect and rehabilitate the dignity of victims. We commend those countries that have also adopted national action plans and urge those that have not done so to make it a priority."

  • Country

    Rwanda
  • Extracts

    As we gather today, 13 years after the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), we believe that it is fair to make an assessment of how effective the implementation of the resolution has been, and possibly draw lessons for the way forward. Despite the improved practice in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), we note that there remains a deficit in opportunities for women to exercise leadership and that there is a continued underrepresentation of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, protection and peacebuilding processes. Both the international community and Member States will need to deploy greater efforts to address those issues and maintain previous gains with a view to reducing the inequalities observed at various levels in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Rwanda
  • Extracts

    My delegation welcomes the adoption of resolution 2122 (2013) and hopes that it will help speed up the implementation of the women and peace and security agenda articulated in resolution 1325 (2000). Specifically, we are pleased that the resolution advocates for improving the quality of gender analysis by calling for gender expertise in all United Nations- led commissions of inquiry, transitional justice mechanisms, groups of experts of the relevant Sanctions Committees and mediation processes; by supporting special representatives, special envoys and mediation support teams and political and peacekeeping missions in that regard; and by deploying gender advisers and women protection advisers. We also welcome the Secretary-General's recommendations, including his call for an independent review of the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in preparation for its high- level review in 2015. We hope that such a review will provide in-depth analysis and recommendations for the best way forward.

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    The adoption by the Security Council of resolution 1325 (2000) and its subsequent resolutions demonstrates the Council's continuous concern at the violence against women in conflict and post-conflict situations. An assessment of the implementation of those resolutions shows that, while they have contributed to promoting gender equality in prevention, participation, protection, peacebuilding and restoring the rule of law, as noted in the report of the Secretary-General before us today (S/2013/525), much remains to be done. The goal of the United Nations in those resolutions is essentially that of freeing women and girls from acts of violence of all kinds and giving them the place that they deserve in society — a goal that has yet to be reached.

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    "The events unfolding in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, in the Central African Republic — as Ms. Balipou mentioned — in Syria and elsewhere around the world, where women continue to be the special target of violence committed by men, show that there is still a long way to go to protect women in situations of armed conflict. Togo nonetheless welcomes the fact that the United Nations, through its peacekeeping operations, has made the protection of civilians an essential element in the mandates of peace missions. The deployment on the ground of gender advisers arises from that determination to help the victims and guide them to the appropriate support services. My country would like to see the deployment of such advisers mainstreamed throughout all missions, with the staffing and resources that they need."

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    However, we acknowledge the efforts of some countries that have integrated gender issues into their national legislation by setting a quota for women in elected positions and high-level decision-making, as is the case in such post-conflict countries as Timor- Leste, Afghanistan, Liberia, Haiti and the Democratic

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    "Republic of the Congo. Rwanda, of course, sets the most progressive example in that respect. Togo encourages the United Nations to assist countries that have not yet done so to integrate into their national systems the experience of those who have managed to increase the role of women in peace processes and post-conflict reconstruction."

  • Country

    Togo
  • Extracts

    Women will not be protected in any lasting way until in-depth legal and judicial reforms are undertaken by countries emerging from armed conflict. Fortunately, a number of countries have undertaken reforms in accordance with the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and other relevant international legal instruments. Clearly, the best way to protect women and fight effectively against the effects of armed conflict on the lives of people in conflict is to take measures to prevent the outbreak of conflicts.

  • Speaker

    African Union
  • Extracts

    Experience has shown that addressing issues of rule of law and transitional justice in those conflict and post- conflict situations has become an urgent and indispensable prerequisite for achieving sustainable peace and stability. Equally important is the need to address the gender dimension and to find ways to tackle issues of rule of law and transitional justice from a gender perspective. In that regard, I wish to join previous speakers in their recommendation of the importance and the content of the resolution 2122 (2013) adopted by the Council today. I wish to thank the Secretary-General for the report (S/2013/525) before us today. I also thank Under- Secretary-General Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director of UN Women; Ms. Navanethem Pillay, United Nations Commissioner for Human Rights; and Ms. Brigitte Balipou of the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security.

  • Speaker

    African Union
  • Extracts

    The African Union takes cognizance of its member States' international commitments in respect of women's rights, most notably Security Council resolutions on women, peace and security, and thus acknowledges and supports the efforts of those African States and regional bodies that have taken concrete steps towards implementing those resolutions. Some notable examples are Liberia, which has developed an action plan and indicators for implementing resolution 1325 (2000), and the International Conference of the Great Lakes Region, which is in the process of developing a regional protocol on sexual and gender-based violence.

  • Speaker

    African Union
  • Extracts

    To that end, the African Union Commission, with the technical support of civil society partners, are leading in the development of the African Union Transitional Justice Policy Framework. The Transitional Justice Policy Framework emerged from the report by the AU Panel of the Wise entitled Non-impunity, truth, peace, justice and reconciliation in Africa: opportunities and constraints. The report interrogates the polarized peace-versus-justice debate that seems to be the focus of international justice discourse in Africa, while seeking to offer a middle ground and an African regional perspective that takes into account the complexities and nuances within the African context, including continental approaches to non-impunity, truth, peace, justice and reconciliation in Africa. The report of the Panel of Wise also concludes that the AU has a sound track record of pronouncements and engagement related to addressing impunity in Africa, in spite of some challenges of coherence and coordination in implementation.

  • Speaker

    African Union
  • Extracts

    The proposed policy framework is intended to serve as a guide that is adaptable and applicable to individual countries or subregions emerging from conflicts and/or repressive rule to assist in the pursuit of accountability, sustainable peace, justice and reconciliation. The African Union Commission has therefore held several consultative meetings, with the technical support of the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, South Africa and other stakeholders. The consultation in Lomé, for example, focused specifically on mainstreaming gender into the policy framework and was undertaken with the support of UN Women. During the meeting, specific language on women and gender considerations for the policy framework was developed.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    Austria is grateful to Azerbaijan for convening today's open debate on women and peace and security, and would like to thank all the briefers for their very interesting presentations. We appreciate the broad range of issues covered in the Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525), as well as the continuing use of indicators that allow for a more accurate and precise assessment of the progress made in implementing resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    The Security Council has clearly recognized its own role in ending impunity for serious violations of international humanitarian and human-rights law, and has acknowledged the full range of justice and reconciliation mechanisms, including in resolution 1894 (2009). In that context, we would like to stress the important role of the International Criminal Court and other international criminal tribunals in the fight against impunity, and we welcome the first investigations of cases of sexual violence before those courts.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    We call on the Security Council to make the best use of the time frame leading up to the high- level review of the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in 2015 and to mainstream measures to enhance women's participation in its work, including in the mandates of peacekeeping and political missions. Our immediate concern must be to increase the number of women in police and military contingents in United Nations peacekeeping operations. In that regard, we welcome today's adoption of resolution 2122 (2013) and its references to the deployment of women in United Nations peacekeeping operations as well as more regular briefings in the Security Council.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    Also, I would like to take this opportunity to give a short update on our national measures to implement resolution 1325 (2000). On the basis of our revised national action plan adopted last year, we have continued our efforts to enhance the gender-expertise of civil and military staff in peacekeeping operations. Together with the Austrian Study Centre for Peace and Conflict Resolution, Austria has developed a training curriculum that fully incorporates both resolutions 1325 (2000) and 1894 (2009) on the protection of civilians. After a pilot course held last year, the first regular course with the new curriculum will be held in early December.

  • Country

    Austria
  • Extracts

    Austria has also continued its efforts to support the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in other forums, including the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). Together with Finland, Turkey and Kazakhstan, we have proposed a draft text for an OSCE-wide action plan on women, peace and security to assist participating States in implementing resolution 1325 (2000). We hope that those efforts will soon lead to a positive result.

  • Country

    Belgium
  • Extracts

    My delegation thanks the Secretary-General and the Executive Director of UN Women, Ms. Mlambo- Ngcuka; the representative of the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security, Ms. Balipou; and Ms. Pillay, the High Commissioner for Human Rights, for their contributions to this debate.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Bosnia and Herzegovina appreciates the convening of the Security Council's semi-annual debate on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). We would like to thank the Secretary-General and the Executive Director of UN Women for their comprehensive briefings. And we extend a warm welcome and our gratitude to the representatives of civil society for their presentations today.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    We believe that the Security Council, UN Women and the Special Representative of the Secretary- General on Sexual Violence in Conflict will ensure that the United Nations works in a concerted and coordinated manner that will strengthen the capacity of the United Nations system to match its commitment to gender equality with the leadership, resources and expertise needed to advance achievements on the ground. The development of additional indicators to track the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) is a significant step in broadening the women and peace and security agenda.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    We affirm our commitment to the rule of law as an imperative for political dialogue and cooperation. In that regard, with the aim of improving the overall situation of women victims of rape, we are making efforts to finalize the drafting of a programme for victims of rape, sexual abuse and torture in Bosnia and Herzegovina for the period 2013-2016. At the State level, a draft transitional justice strategy has been developed to create an acceptable platform for efficient and realistic mechanisms and activities to correct the injustices and heal the traumas resulting from the armed conflict in the 1990s.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    We also emphasize that Bosnia and Herzegovina fully supports the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), the provisions of which have been incorporated into the Bosnia and Herzegovina gender action plan and the action plan for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). Besides defining goals and activities, the action plan includes an introduction, an analysis of the de facto situations, and eight goals with strictly defined activities, deadlines, the definition of responsibility and partners. In this regard, through the action plan, we have shown our dedication to increasing the representation of women in decision-making positions at all levels of power in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In addition, we are undertaking efforts to increase the number of women in military and police forces and to ensure their inclusion in executive positions within such forces.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    Increasing the number of women in peacekeeping missions and introducing gender perspectives into the training of participants in peace missions are further priorities for us. We are also making additional efforts to strengthen capacities in fighting trafficking, decreasing the danger of mined areas, improving support networks for women and girls who were victimized during the war, and increasing the knowledge and capacities of civil society. Furthermore, the gender equality agency started a project on the implementation of the resolution 1325 (2000) action plan at the local level in cooperation with the non-governmental organization Women BH and with the financial support of UN Women. This project represents an innovation not only in Bosnia and Herzegovina but also at the regional level.

  • Country

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Extracts

    While much has indeed been accomplished, a great deal remains to be done to obtain real results for women on the ground. To that end, it is of vital importance for all United Nations stakeholders, and especially the Security Council, to continue to use appropriate tools at their disposal for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). At the same time, Member States need to take decisive action accompanied by clear goals, baselines and indicators to monitor and assess its implementation. The goals for the future have already been identified. We must now find the will and persistence to achieve them. I assure the Council of Bosnia and Herzegovina's full cooperation in this endeavour.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    At the outset, allow me to join others in expressing gratitude to the Secretary- General, the Executive Director of UN Women, the High Commissioner for Human Rights and the representative of the Non-governmental Organization Working Group on Women, Peace and Security for their statements. I would also like to thank the Council presidency for taking up the topic and organizing the open debate today.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    Estonia was honoured to join the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict during the General Assembly's opening week. We were also glad to see how much interest there was in the topic of enhancing accountability for sexual violence in conflict, discussed at a side event during that week that focused on the role of the ICC and that was hosted by the Estonian Mission to the United Nations. We would like to commend the important work of the Team of Experts on Rule of Law and Sexual Violence in Conflict, and I am glad to note that Estonia has made financial contributions to the activities of the Team.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    Let me also commend UN Women for their work targeted at raising the number of national action plans related to resolution 1325 (2000) or other relevant planning instruments, as outlined in the recently adopted UN Women Strategic Plan. Estonia developed its national action plan in 2010 and has advised a number of States on developing theirs. We would be ready to cooperate in that regard with other States in the future. We are looking forward to hearing the results of the global study, and to the high-level review in 2015.

  • Country

    Estonia
  • Extracts

    In conclusion, we are glad to note that Estonia was among the sponsors of resolution 2106 (2013), which strengthens the monitoring and prevention of sexual violence in conflict, and we were happy to co-sponsor resolution 2122 (2013), adopted today.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Germany welcomes the detailed analysis of the Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525), which identifies many achievements in the women, peace and security agenda in the past years. We also share the concerns addressed in the report, such as an increasing focus of the international community on women as victims of armed conflict, instead of on their role as actors in peace processes and agents of change in all spheres of society.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    We should ask ourselves what more Member States and the United Nations itself could do to ensure an implementation of the full agenda as laid out in resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Secondly, 43 countries have adopted national action plans on women, peace and security. That is an important first step. However, any progress on the ground depends on the political will to abide by those commitments. The German national action plan, which was adopted last year, covers the four focus areas set out in resolution 1325 (2000) and additionally includes the areas of preparation for peace missions and the prosecution of crimes. The implementation of the action plan is monitored by an inter-ministerial working group in collaboration with representatives from civil society. German diplomatic missions abroad have been instructed to support the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), for example by advocating for the inclusion of women in local crisis prevention, conflict management and post-conflict peacebuilding or by supporting gender-sensitive projects on the ground.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Fourthly, women protection advisers play a central role in monitoring and reporting to the Council, training mission personnel on preventing and responding to sexual violence, and engaging in dialogue with conflict parties. Although we welcome the deployment of women protection advisers to the missions in South Sudan and Mali, the remaining women's protection advisers in the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the United Nations Operation in Côte d'Ivoire and the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur, which were already mandated by the Council, should also be deployed as rapidly as possible and, where necessary, be included in mission budgets.

  • Country

    Germany
  • Extracts

    Germany will continue its support to UN Women and all other relevant actors, including civil society organizations, to ensure that women's roles and their important contribution in conflict resolution and peacebuilding are adequately taken into account.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    The rule of law should address justice, equality and equity with a strong focus on the empowerment of women and girls, gender equality, and preventing and combating violence against women as essential preconditions for equitable and inclusive sustainable development. In that context, we praise the work of the United Nations in assisting Member States to address rule of law issues in conflict contexts and we consider it vital that the United Nations continues to emphasize the importance of providing redress and assistance to victims in conflict, post-conflict and other crisis situations.

  • Country

    Greece
  • Extracts

    The prevention of and response to violence against children, in particular, including sexual violence and abuse, forced marriage and maltreatment, should continue to be an important focus area of United Nations assistance.

  • Country

    Guatemala
  • Extracts

    Before delivering my statement, I would like to say that this morning, my delegation had requested the right to explain its vote. I would like to believe that an unintentional error caused that opportunity to be lost. Our motive was not to explain why we voted in favour of resolution 2122 (2013), but rather to explain why we did not sponsor it, which would have been our normal inclination, given our strong commitment to resolution 1325 (2000). The reason was that despite my delegation's reiterated proposals for a slight nuance in the language of the eighth preambular paragraph, to accommodate it in our national legislation, our proposals were not heeded, and we merely wanted to have that recorded.

  • Country

    Guatemala
  • Extracts

    We thank the Secretary-General for his report (S/2013/525) and for presenting it to the Council. We also thank the new Executive Director of UN Women, Ms. Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, for her presentation. I thank Ms. Navanethem Pillay for her valuable contributions to the topic in the Council today, and I especially thank Ms. Brigitte Balipou for providing so eloquently a collective vision of civil society organizations, whose participation we have consistently supported. I also note that we value the concept paper prepared by the presidency (S/2013/587, annex).

  • Country

    Guatemala
  • Extracts

    Although so far the Council has held seven debates on the issue of the rule of law, there is still a way to go to achieve overall accountability for crimes affecting women and girls. Nor have we made sufficient progress in achieving women's full participation in the processes of transitional justice. Similarly, there is room to improve the analysis of sex-differentiated effects on women and girls when the rule of law is violated during and after conflicts.

  • Country

    Guatemala
  • Extracts

    We have previously said that, based on our own experience, the boundaries between peacebuilding, peacekeeping and economic, social and legal transformations are not clear. Therefore, we think it is of the utmost importance to advance the fight against impunity, improve access to justice for women and strengthen the justice system infrastructure to deal with such crimes, both nationally and internationally. With regard to our own country, we have adopted legislation on femicide and established courts for the prosecution of that crime, as well as justice centres for onsite legal, judicial and medical services, including psychosocial support for women and their children. We agree with the Secretary-General's recommendation that we must step up efforts to meet and fund the recovery needs of women and girls, especially those who have become heads of households.

  • Country

    Guatemala
  • Extracts

    Moreover, my country wishes to acknowledge the work of UN Women, whose establishment was a singularly important institutional step forward, among other things to promote the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). We support greater participation by women in peacebuilding and strengthening civil capacity after conflicts to be consistent with the issue of women and peace and security. We believe that it is necessary to recognize women as builders of peace and stability.

  • Country

    Guatemala
  • Extracts

    "The resolution that we adopted today contributes to reducing the vulnerability of women and girls in armed conflict and post-conflict situations. We recognize the need to receive timely information in order to intervene early and save lives. In that sense, preventing conflicts is the best way to protect all civilians from the horrors that accompany armed conflicts, in particular women and girls."

  • Country

    Guatemala
  • Extracts

    Finally, we believe that the fifteenth anniversary of the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), in 2015, will provide not only the Security Council but the entire United Nations system an opportunity to review the levels of implementation of that resolution and to renew commitments to combat violence, including sexual violence. We urge all Member States and the United Nations system to facilitate greater participation by women in that area.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    Allow me at the outset to convey to you, Sir, on behalf of the Moroccan delegation, our gratitude for the convening of this debate. I thank for their briefings Secretary- General Ban Ki-moon; Ms. Navanethem Pillay, High Commissioner for Human Rights; and Ms. Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director of UN Women. I welcome Ms. Mlambo-Ngcuka's appointment and assure her of our full cooperation and support as she discharges her mission. We also thank Ms. Brigitte Balipou, Chair of the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security, for her constructive contribution.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    The signing of peace agreements and ceasefire agreements and the implementation of national action plans and programmes for the protection of women in conflict-affected countries have made it possible to identify, in a more appropriate way, the ways and means likely to promote women's rights and to strengthen their participation in efforts to prevent and resolve conflicts and in post-conflict reconstruction.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    My delegation supports the initiatives of the Team of Experts on the Rule of Law and Sexual Violence in Conflict to assist States in strengthening the rule of law, transitional justice and security sector reform. My delegation also supports the elaboration by the Standing Committee on Women, Peace and Security of the strategic framework intended to assist Member States in achieving their interim objectives, in preparation for the meeting planned for 2015 on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) at national, regional and international levels.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    Effective and optimal empowerment of women in the context of peacebuilding and post-conflict reconstruction involves the collective and coordinated action of the international community and the United Nations system, through strengthening protection and prevention measures adapted to specific contexts that will facilitate the implementation of the resolution.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    The establishment of genuine peace requires the establishment of inclusive and durable political, economic and social structures. Within that framework, local women's entities are a driving force in empowering women and strengthening good governance. My delegation welcomes the work carried out in the framework of the United Nations system to strengthen women's capacities and involvement in mediation and peacebuilding processes. Similarly, it supports the implementation of the Secretary-General's seven-point action plan (see S/2010/466), which enables greater consideration of gender issues in peacebuilding operations.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    While the responsibility to put an end to the tragic consequences of armed conflict for women and children lies with States, coordinated and sustained action among the various national and United Nations actors involved in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) is necessary to strengthen existing initiatives.

  • Country

    Morocco
  • Extracts

    Firm political will and full commitment of Member States to the measures in resolution 1325 (2000) will guarantee the active participation of women in national, regional and international institutions for the prevention, protection and management of conflict situations.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    While it is obvious that States have the primary responsibility for ensuring that the Resolutions on Women, Peace and Security are translated into action, regional organizations working on the maintenance of international peace and security such as the OSCE, also have a recognized role. Both the recent Presidential Statement on cooperation with regional organizations, passed in August of this year by the Council, and several of the Women, Peace and Security resolutions refer to the crucial contribution of regional organizations in affirming the participation of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution mechanisms and peace-building.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    There is a good window of opportunity now to give women peace and security issues a boost on the regional level as the UN is currently leading a process of strengthening the role of regional organizations under Chapter VIII of the UN Charter, dealing with conflict prevention, in particular early warning and early action. The OSCE Secretary General in his recent round of consultations with senior UN interlocutors, including the UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon and Deputy SG Eliasson, found strong support for the OSCE to play a central role in this process. The OSCE welcomes in this regard the adoption of today's resolution, which clearly recognizes the efforts of regional organizations in implementing Women, Peace and Security commitments, including the development of action plans and implementation frameworks.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    To take just one example: the OSCE promotes gender balance in its work with judicial personnel because we believe that diversity has a positive impact on women's access to justice and the perceived legitimacy of the judiciary. From a substantive perspective our Mission to Bosnia and Herzegovina supports the integration of a gender perspective into war crimes trial monitoring by providing specific training for civil society on how to monitor conflict-related sexual violence cases and understand the specific challenges that witnesses and victims face in these processes. Trial monitors are then better prepared to gather data on how these cases progress through the judicial system and to advocate for policy improvements based on the data. This is one step in ensuring that justice and accountability is equally pursued for all violations and crimes, regardless of their nature or the sex of the victim.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    Allow me at this point, Mr. President, to refer to one more issue that we believe is important also in the framework of today's debate. The OSCE is a leader in a key peace and security issue that is not discussed enough from a “Women, Peace and Security” perspective: integrating a gender perspective in combating violent extremism and radicalization that leads to terrorism. This is an issue of serious concern to OSCE participating States. Both national authorities and international and regional organizations increasingly recognize that a better understanding of the dynamics of this issue is central to formulating and implementing effective strategies that will increase stability and security. The OSCE will undertake a new initiative in 2014 in partnership with the Global Counter-Terrorism Forum that aims to promote gender-sensitive strategies, policies and measures to counter violent extremism and radicalization that leads to terrorism, with an emphasis on empowering women to contribute to these efforts in different roles and capacities.

  • Speaker

    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
  • Extracts

    I would like to conclude by drawing attention to the good cooperation between OSCE Field Operations and UN Women offices on Women, Peace and Security issues. For example, next month we will be co-hosting a conference in Almaty for OSCE participating States to discuss with expert representatives and Civil Society Organizations progress in drafting and implementing National Action Plans or other strategies on Security Council Resolution 1325. The results of this conference will be merged with the outcome of an OSCE study on good practices and lessons learned by OSCE participating States undertaken with the Peace Research Institute in Oslo - PRIO. We hope that events and research such as these will provide us with further insight on how to put into practice the important goals in the women, peace and security resolutions and that UN Member States can benefit from knowledge generated by the OSCE.

  • Country

    Pakistan
  • Extracts

    We welcome the convening of this debate under your auspices, Mr. President. We are grateful to the Secretary- General for his insightful briefing and for his strong leadership in advancing the agenda on women and peace and security. Pakistan welcomes the statements made this morning by Ms. Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, the Executive Director of UN Women, and by Ms. Navanethem Pillay, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. We also appreciate the important civil-society perspective shared with us by Ms. Brigitte Balipou.

  • Country

    Pakistan
  • Extracts

    Appreciable progress has been made over the years in promoting the agenda on women and peace and security, but much remains to be done to fully translate the objectives of resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent decisions of the Council into more tangible results on the ground. We do have a solid and comprehensive normative framework in our hands; resolution 2122 (2013), adopted today, further consolidates it. We should now focus on its implementation, which is key to overcoming operational gaps and challenges, and to delivering on our promise of peace and security for women, who are the most vulnerable group in armed conflicts. In conflicts, violence against women is widely used as an instrument of war. Urgent steps must be taken to stop gender-based and sexual violence and end impunity for perpetrators of sexual crimes.

  • Country

    Pakistan
  • Extracts

    "We speak on the subject from experience, and our feedback to the Security Council is positive. The Council's decisions and direction are helping women caught in situations of armed conflict. We believe that the Council should continue to address those issues in accordance with its primary responsibility of maintaining international peace and security. The mandate for women and peace and security pertains to conflict and post- conflict situations on the Council's agenda. We should all adhere to the parameters of that mandate, which has set new standards, established new practices and raised expectations for improving the situation of women. Diverging from it would dissipate the consensus around the issue."A

  • Country

    Pakistan
  • Extracts

    "Given women's strong stake in peace and in how peace is negotiated, kept and consolidated, the role of women as peacemakers and peacebuilders must be integrated into the various stages of engagement, outreach and decision-making. Increased integration in pursuing the agenda on women and peace and security is useful for enhanced coordination and for avoiding duplication and the overlap of efforts and resources. However, too much integration can also carry the risk of losing the original focus on the primary objectives of that agenda. Including peripheral issues in the Council's work relating to women and peace and security would not only blur the focus but affect implementation."

  • Country

    Pakistan
  • Extracts

    We believe that the real value of thematic discussions in the Council is to help identify the related aspects in the Council's country-specific work in practical terms. It is there that the gaps in implementation lie and it is there that action is needed the most. As the Council saw first hand during its recent mission to the Democratic Republic of the Congo, there are continuing challenges in implementing the women and peace and security agenda on the ground. A proactive rather than a reactive approach is required to enhance implementation. Considering women as agents of change is an affirmation of such a proactive approach.

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    One of the main characteristics of the world today is the significant number of crises in which women suffer. At the same time, not all of those situations pose a threat to international peace and security that would require intervention by the Security Council. Let us recall that issues of gender violence fall within the framework of mandates tackled not only by the Security Council but also by the General Assembly, the Peacebuilding Commission, the Human Rights Council, and the Commission on the Status of Women. We must abide by the existing principles of the division of labour within our Organization, without duplicating the efforts and competencies of the various bodies.

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    We believe that the Council's effective implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) requires an unwavering focus on a decisive mandate that approaches women's issues in the context of international peace and security and other such issues within its agenda.

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    We have carefully familiarized ourselves with the report of the Secretary-General prepared for today's meeting (S/2013/525). We should like to point out that it is factually incomplete. We believe that in the future, such reports should consider the nature of violence against women in the context of the maintenance of international peace and security in a more balanced way, as stipulated by resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    As far as facts in the report are concerned, they have been compiled on the basis of the first third of the assessment indicators on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), and we still have questions regarding the usefulness and relevance of individual indicators, as well as the scope for applying them. We believe that work on indicators, which is still undergoing approval, must be transparent and open in nature.

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    After all, issues of international peace and security are of interest to all States Members of the United Nations. We do not share the report's concept of using national plans of action for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) as an assessment tool for States' policies to improve the overall status of women. Relevant national plans ought to be prepared voluntarily by those States that find themselves in situations of armed conflict. If other States wish to elaborate similar national plans, that is clearly their right. However, the voluntary decision of individual States to do that should not mean that everyone is obliged to do so.

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    It is just as important to include such issues in the mandates of relevant missions. We urge States to tackle those issues not in a predetermined way, but by being mindful of individual situations. Such a differentiated approach must also be applied when giving the United Nations system instructions on how to integrate gender issues into their mandates. They have clear mandates, and for the majority of them, issues of women, peace and security are not an absolute priority but merely one of a number of factors within the framework of action aimed at preventing and resolving armed conflict and post-conflict situations. Let us not forget that the leading role in protecting women at all stages of armed conflict lies with national Governments, while measures taken by bodies of the United Nations system and by civil society must be aimed at backing and complimenting efforts made by States.

  • Country

    Russia
  • Extracts

    We do not share the point of view that establishing a specialized Security Council mechanism for gender issues would be useful. We believe that ensuring the effectiveness of the existing mechanisms for implementing resolution 1325 (2000) does not hinge on creating new bureaucratic procedures but rather on improving the coordination and accountability of existing mechanisms under the leadership of UN Women.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    First of all, it places Women, Peace and Security front and centre in the Council's work. The Secretary- General has outlined what that means for the Council and his own personal commitment to this, but it also means, in a very practical sense, that the Council will now receive more regular briefings and more updates from UN bodies and officials on this subject. That means that it is central to our work. Secondly, the Resolution highlights the need for women's participation in areas affected by conflict. We've asked that Special-Representatives and Special-Envoys in all UN Missions regularly to consult Women's organisations from early on in their deployment. Their voices must be heard and needs taken into account in all conflict resolution and peace-building processes. Third, the Resolution makes clear the Council's commitment to a meaningful review of the implementation of this agenda in 2015 as the Secretary-General emphasised in his remarks earlier. This review must be based on clear data and we have therefore requested the Secretary- General to commission a global study on the remaining gaps and challenges.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    The United Kingdom has established a Team of Experts on the Rule of Law. This Team which includes lawyers, gender advisors and experts in the protection of victims and witnesses provides training and mentoring to national authorities to help them develop appropriate laws and build their capabilities. The teams also worked on the frontline with grassroots organisations, local peace builders and human rights defenders. They have already been deployed to the Syrian borders, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Libya, Mali and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    The United Kingdom welcomes the report of the Secretary General and the important recommendations that it makes. We welcome the ongoing work of UN Women. And we recognise the continuing challenges in implementing this agenda lie beyond the topic of today's debate. In conflict settings worldwide women continue to be seen merely victims of violence rather than leaders of change, as those to be protected rather than respected and included as equal participants in all decision making processes. As Ms Mlambo- ngcuka said, women are central to leadership. Since the end of the Cold War, women have represented only 4 percent of signatories to peace agreements, less than 3 percent of mediators of peace talks, and less than 10 percent of anyone sitting at the table to negotiate on behalf of a party to conflict. Excluding 50% of society will never lead to stable and lasting peace. Peace can only be achieved with women's active participation and leadership.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    The United Kingdom welcomes the Council's consultation with women's organisations during its trip to the Democratic Republic of Congo this month. We also commend the recent work of Mary Robinson, I agree with the Secretary-General that was an excellent appointment, on engaging with women's civil society in the Great Lakes region, and hope others will follow by example.

  • Country

    United Kingdom
  • Extracts

    We have two years before the Council's high level review in 2015 to demonstrate our collective commitment to this agenda. Ahead of this, let us all - Member States, the Council, and UN entities - invigorate our efforts and give this agenda the attention it deserves and take the action that we have committed to here today.

  • Country

    Belarus
  • Extracts

    We are grateful to the Secretary-General and his Special Representative on Sexual Violence for their personal commitment and leadership in the fight against violence against women. We also believe that UN Women and the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights should play an important role in combating violence against women and protecting women's rights.

  • Country

    Belarus
  • Extracts

    We believe that a thorough investigation of all acts of sexual violence and the immediate punishment of perpetrators are crucial in combatting this scourge. That violence can be eliminated only through coherent collective efforts by the international community — Member States, international organizations and civil society. Such efforts can and should be carried out through a genuine partnership based on a unified approach, respect for each other's views and agreement on the steps to be taken.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    In order to promote women truly shouldering their peacekeeping roles and playing at important part in peacebuilding processes, the various United Nations bodies and entities should work in accordance with their respective mandates, with a clear division of labour and as one. I wish to highlight the following four points.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    First, it is national Governments that have the primary responsibility to protect women's safety and their rights and interests. The international community should support the countries concerned in their efforts to that end by providing constructive assistance. External support should fully respect national sovereignty and, in keeping with specific national conditions and needs, focus on capacity-building and stepping up assistance, with a view to helping the countries concerned overcome financial and technical difficulties.

  • Country

    China
  • Extracts

    Secondly, the Security Council should play its unique role fully, while strengthening its coordination and cooperation with related organizations and agencies. As the primary institution for maintaining international peace and security, the Council should focus on conflict prevention, dispute mediation and post-conflict reconstruction so as to foster an enabling political, security and rule-of-law environment for safeguarding women's security, rights and interests. The General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council, the Human Rights Council, UN Women and other United Nations agencies should discharge their respective responsibilities while working closely with one another with a view to generating synergies.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    We warmly welcome today's landmark resolution of the Security Council (resolution 2122 (2013), a resolution that can fairly be described as representing the high water mark so far in terms of advancing the agenda relating to women and peace and security. Although — or maybe because — the links between women and peace and security are so well established and that set of issues is now a well-developed part of the Security Council's broader work programme, there is a clear need for a more consistent and systematic application of resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions on the subject.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    Ireland is a founding member of the ACT (accountability, coherence and transparency) group, which is pressing for the Security Council to be more accountable, more coherent and more transparent in its working methods. I assume that the enhanced focus on women and peace and security in today's resolution will mean improvements in both the quantity and quality of briefing that will be provided to the Council on those issues.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    What distinguishes today's resolution from others is that it represents a pivot away from a narrow focus on women as victims and towards the more positive and liberating agenda of women's participation and women's leadership. Welcome attention is paid to the active role that women and women's groups can play in transforming conflict, insecurity and fragility. That aspect has been insufficiently highlighted. It is often overshadowed by the appalling suffering inflicted on women through, for example, sexual violence in conflict.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    Fortunately, as the report of the Secretary- General of 4 September (S/2013/525) acknowledges, times of transition and flux can present opportunities to strengthen women's leadership, empowerment and rights in the process of restoring the rule of law and governance systems. As his report indicates, the participation of women in peace negotiations and donor conferences has increased over the past year. Active support for such participation, which is being provided by gender experts and women's civil society organizations, is growing, and some peace agreements have included gender-sensitive language. That is encouraging. Yet the progress being made is hard fought and uneven.

  • Country

    Ireland
  • Extracts

    One of the most eloquent champions of women's rights in the world today is Mary Robinson, a former President of Ireland and the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for the Great Lakes Region. The “Framework of Hope” that she has set out for progress in that region highlights the empowerment of women as a factor of critical importance. It is based on a vision of reaching beyond traditional political leaders to energize civil society, especially women's groups. The Bujumbura declaration of 11 July 2013 was a product of that approach.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    As Prime Minister of Japan Shinzo Abe announced in his statement to the General Assembly last month (see A/68/PV.12), Japan is actively committed to engaging in the international agenda concerning women and to making every effort to create a society where women shine. We are planning to extend official development aid amounting to more than $3 billion over the next three years in the areas of women's social advancement and capacity-building; women's health care; and women's participation and protection in the field of peace and security.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    In order to realize a more peaceful society, Japan intends to make its utmost effort to ensure women's participation and incorporate a women's perspective into each and every phase of conflict prevention, conflict settlement and peacebuilding, including election processes. Such women's participation will also contribute to better protecting the rights and the physical well-being of women, including female human rights defenders, female political leaders and female war correspondents, who are particularly exposed to danger in times of conflict.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    In July, in collaboration with the Global Network of Women Peacebuilders, our Mission held a special event entitled “Resolution 1325 (2000) in action: lessons learned and reflections”. The summary of the discussion held at that event has been included in the Secretary-General's report. We hope that it will further serve as an input to the global review of resolution 1325 (2000) in November.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    Increasing investment in the capacity and resources of women's civil society organizations that are active in conflict-affected countries should also be considered. In that regard, Japan was one of the initial supporters, and continues to be one of the main contributors, of the United Nations Trust Fund in Support of Actions to Eliminate Violence against Women, which directly supports such civil society organizations. We will continue our contribution to the Fund. Furthermore, Japan co-hosted a special event in July with the Fund to expand its donor base, including private-sector donors.

  • Country

    Japan
  • Extracts

    In addition, I would like to share with the Council our experience of making use of an area of Japan's official development assistance schemes that we call grant assistance for grassroots projects, which we believe is a positive example of a good practice that could be emulated elsewhere. Grant assistance for grassroots projects is intended to provide rapid and direct support to both international and local non-governmental organizations active on the ground. Through such assistance, we have been implementing numerous projects on this basis all over the world, including in Afghanistan and several African countries, providing useful synergies for both donor and recipient countries.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    Luxembourg backs the partnership between the intergovernmental Justice Rapid Response and UN Women. In cooperation with the Institute for International Criminal Investigations, that partnership has made it possible to establish a list of specialized experts on the investigation of acts of sexual violence. In that way, experts can be rapidly deployed as required. UN Women has already resorted to using such experts to assist the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights in numerous commissions of inquiry. Experts have also lent their assistance to the International Criminal Court. Luxembourg will continue to support that initiative, which reinforces both responsibility and the transitional justice process.

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    The Security Council must play its full role in promoting the topic of women and peace and security. Unfortunately, there continues to be a clear gap between principled statements and the unanimous support of the Council for the issue of women, on the one hand, and the concrete implementation of those statements, on the other. We therefore support the recommendation by the Secretary-General's in his latest report that “when establishing and renewing [United Nations] mission mandates, a more consistent approach with regard to the inclusion of gender-specific provisions could be sought.” (S/2013/525, para. 73).

  • Country

    Luxembourg
  • Extracts

    By adopting resolution 1325 (2000), 13 years ago, the Security Council set itself bold objectives. Resolution 2122 (2013), which we have just adopted today — thanks in particular to the efforts of the United Kingdom — allows us to make progress. It underscores in paricular the need for the Security Council to receive information more regularly with regard to the issue of women and peace and security. The resolution will bring new impetus as we near the fifteenth anniversary of the flagship resolution 1325 (2000), which will be an opportunity to take stock — positively one hopes — of its implementation.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    In our effort to secure peace and security, we must move urgently to replace the prevailing culture of impunity with one that promotes the rule of law, justice and accountability. Underlining the importance of ending sexual violence, Malaysia is pleased to report that it has joined many others in endorsing the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict, which makes clear the collective view on the need of greater action to address the issue.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    My delegation is concerned with the often inadequate legal frameworks on women's rights in post-conflict countries. In that matter, we could take a page from the lessons learned through established courts, such as the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and the International Criminal Tribunal of the Former Yugoslavia, which offer insightful lessons from the prosecution of sexual and gender-based crimes. Those could be applied to future tribunals and domestic judicial processes. Furthermore, Governments that have experienced conflict could consider allocating greater financial resources to investigate cases of sexual violence. There is also a need to ensure that international and national courts have adequate expertise. In that regard, countries in a position to do so should render assistance to post-conflict societies.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    In addressing the issues of women's empowerment after conflicts,attention should be given to strengthening the security of women through rules and regulations. That could be done through setting up institutional and administrative machinery to plan, coordinate, implement and monitor development programmes for women. My delegation cannot stress enough the importance of increased access for women to education and employment, as well as the development of policies and services that offer equal livelihood opportunities to women. At the same time, we must also remember the importance of access to health care, especially for victims of sexual and gender-based violence.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    Malaysia welcomes today's adoption of the resolution 2122 (2013) on the issue discussed. My delegation hopes that there will be sufficient impetus toward the actual realization of the resolution and the landmark resolution 1325 (2000). Malaysia therefore appreciates the ongoing update on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in the Secretary-General's report (S/2013/525) of 4 September. As mentioned in the report, there remains a deficit in opportunities for women to exercise leadership, and women are still underrepresented in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, protection and peacebuilding processes. My delegation believes that the greater active participation of women in peacekeeping and peacebuilding would go a long way towards including a gender perspective and allowing women to shape peace.

  • Country

    Malaysia
  • Extracts

    We strongly believe that the subject of women, peace and security deserves the Security Council's sustained attention. Malaysia reaffirms its commitment to the efforts to address sexual violence in conflict and post- conflict situations. Nonetheless, we must insist that gender equality and efforts to encourage and instill a gender perspective be promoted during times of peace rather than solely during times of conflict. The respect and promotion of women's rights must become part of the culture of every society. In that regard, the Council can be assured of our continuous engagement and unrelenting support for the advancement