Peacekeeping

The Peacekeeping theme focuses on a gendered approach to multi-dimensional peacekeeping missions, predominantly through gender mainstreaming of peace support operations and the increase of female recruitment in peacekeeping, military, and police.

The Security Council calls for an increase in the number of women in peacekeeping operations (1325,OP6).

It is also important to note that the issues of gender and peacekeeping should never be reduced to the number of women recruited as peacekeepers. Promoting security is about providing real human security for the population, not about the militarisation of women. The point is not to achieve gender parity for its own sake, but rather to draw on the unique and powerful contribution women can make to peacekeeping.

The Security Council commits to include a gender component in UN field operations (1325,OP5), and requests that the Secretary-General’s reports to include information on the progress of gender mainstreaming within each operation (1325,OP17). Without a gender perspective, it is almost impossible to adequately create an inclusive security, which forms the basis of promoting sustainable and durable peace. Gender training, pre-deployment, on the ground, and post-deployment is effective for ensuring peacekeeping personnel have sufficient knowledge and skills.

Peacekeeping missions are increasingly being mandated to address sexual violence (1960,OP10), and training can increase the prevention, recognition, and response to sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and sexual exploitation and abuse (1820,OP6). The implementation of the Women, Peace and Security agenda varies greatly among Peacekeeping Operations. This variation is a result of the peacekeeping mission’s mandates and also structure, leadership, funding, whether there is a designation of a separate unit to address gender, and the number of gender advisors. These key gaps were highlighted in DPKO’s Ten-Year Impact Study on Implementation of Resolution 1325 in Peacekeeping.


These measures can trigger positive changes for women within conflict and post-conflict situations, such as increased physical security, employment-related benefits, capacity building for local women’s organisations, and increased awareness of women’s rights. Additionally, positive role models and examples of women’s leadership have a positive effect on the environment and contribute to the success of peacekeeping missions.

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Security Council Open Debate on Sexual Violence in Conflict, April 2018: Israel (Extract 2)

Extract: 

In some instances over recent years, victims of sexual violence were violated not only by extremist armed groups and repressive regimes, but also by United Nations peacekeepers. Among those sent to protect local populations from harm, there have been individuals who have abused their positions and violated the most basic human rights. Such acts of sexual exploitation and abuse must not be tolerated.

Security Council Open Debate on Sexual Violence in Conflict, April 2018: Jordan (Extract 2)

Extract: 

Jordanian women are active in United Nations peacekeeping operations, in military and police units in Darfur, South Sudan and Abyei. We fully support the Secretary-General’s efforts to implement the zerotolerance policy with regard to sexual exploitation and abuse.

Security Council Open Debate on Sexual Violence in Conflict, April 2018: Egypt (Extract 5)

Extract: 

Fifth, we support the efforts of the Special Coordinator on improving the United Nations response to sexual exploitation and abuse, within her mandate, to address cases of sexual exploitation and abuse by United Nations personnel or personnel under the United Nations flag. We are committed to the zerotolerance policy of the Secretary-General with regard to sexual exploitation crimes.

Security Council Open Debate on Sexual Violence in Conflict, April 2018: Brazil (Extract 4)

Extract: 

We express our appreciation for and gratitude to the Secretary-General for his new strategic approach to taking action against sexual exploitation and abuse committed by personnel of United Nations peacekeeping missions and special political missions. Brazil signed the voluntary compact on preventing and addressing sexual exploitation and abuse and strongly supports all efforts for its full implementation.

Security Council Open Debate on Sexual Violence in Conflict, April 2018: Brazil (Extract 2)

Extract: 

The increase in the number of women in United Nations peacekeeping operations and in peacebuilding initiatives is a central element in advancing the prevention of and response to sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict situations, including in cases of sexual abuse and exploitation.

Security Council Open Debate on Sexual Violence in Conflict, April 2018: Canada (Extract 1)

Extract: 

We must ensure that related expertise, including gender advisers and women protection advisers, are provided with the access and resources needed to fulfil their critical tasks in peacekeeping operations. Cooperation with local civil society organizations can also help identify precursors, risks and prevention and protection strategies for sexual violence in conflict.

Security Council Open Debate on Sexual Violence in Conflict, April 2018: Peru (Extract 3)

Extract: 

The Peruvian commitment to the women and peace and security agenda is also manifested in the progressive increase in Peruvian women’s participation as Blue Helmets, pursuant to resolution 1820 (2008). In this regard, we wish to highlight the importance of incorporating the gender perspective into the mandates of peacekeeping operations deployed by the Council.

Security Council Open Debate on Sexual Violence in Conflict, April 2018: Kazakhstan (Extract 4)

Extract: 

Kazakhstan integrates the women and peace and security agenda in its national legislation, including formulating new strong pro-women policies that will guarantee women’s engagement in decision-making at all levels in the political and economic life of the country. Training on gender equality for the armed and security forces and deploying women in United Nations peacekeeping operations are also priorities

Security Council Open Debate on Sexual Violence in Conflict, April 2018: Kazakhstan (Extract 3)

Extract: 

We strongly believe that preventing sexual exploitation and abuse by the peacekeepers should be an absolute priority, with zero tolerance for such offences. Peacekeeping missions must include protecting civilians, especially women and girls, as a fundamental element in their mandates, including greater recruitment of women military and police officers.

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